San Francisco

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Summer of Love

 

In the summer of 1967, thousands of young people from across the country flocked to San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district to join in the hippie experience, only to discover that what they had come for was already disappearing. By 1968 the celebration of free love, music and an alternative lifestyle had descended into a maelstrom of drug abuse, broken dreams and occasional violence. Through interviews with a broad range of individuals who lived through the summer of love, as well as police officers walking the beat, teenage runaways who left home without looking back, non-hippie residents who resented the invasion of their community and scholars who still have difficulty interpreting the phenomenon – this presentation offers a complex portrait of the notorious event that many consider the peak of the 1960s counter-culture movement.

 

LUCKY CHOW
Made in China

 

LUCKY CHOW returns for a second season with host Danielle Chang, who explores Asian cuisine’s impact on American food culture, while discovering how deeply Asian culture is rooted in our everyday lives.

 

Made In China
Danielle checks out some Chinese culinary traditions in America. She visits an industrial kitchen where traditional “confinement meals” are made for new mothers across the country; a Manhattan cocktail den whose main ingredient is the fiery liquor baijiu; and a wedding in the heart of San Francisco’s Chinatown where old world and new meet at the banquet table and on the dance floor.

 

THE KITCHEN WISDOM OF CECILIA CHIANG
Passing on the Wisdom

THE KITCHEN WISDOM OF CECILIA CHIANG: Passing on the Wisdom

 

In 1961, Cecilia Chiang, introduced America to authentic Szechuan, Hunan and Beijing cuisine, when she opened her internationally renowned restaurant The Mandarin in San Francisco. She introduced and revolutionized Chinese cooking in America. In this series, top chefs of the San Francisco Bay Area invite Cecilia into their kitchens to recreate some of her classic dishes.

 

Passing on the Wisdom
Well into her 90’s, Cecilia is still mentoring a new generation of San Francisco’s chefs. Belinda Leong, chef and co-owner of b.patisserie is like a daughter to Cecilia and together they recreate a Mandarin classic dessert, glacéed bananas.

 

THE KITCHEN WISDOM OF CECILIA CHIANG
Last Flight Out of Shanghai

THE KITCHEN WISDOM OF CECILIA CHIANG: Last Flight Out of Shanghai

 

In 1961, Cecilia Chiang, introduced America to authentic Szechuan, Hunan and Beijing cuisine, when she opened her internationally renowned restaurant The Mandarin in San Francisco. She introduced and revolutionized Chinese cooking in America. In this series, top chefs of the San Francisco Bay Area invite Cecilia into their kitchens to recreate some of her classic dishes.

 

Last Flight Out of Shanghai
Cecilia is joined by Chef Keiko Takahashi, the first Japanese woman in the world to win a Michelin star. Cecilia shows Keiko the simplicity of her whole steamed bass with ginger and scallions. Keiko reciprocates with an amazing 12 pound slab of bluefin tuna flown in from Japan that she turns into a delicate sashimi.

 

THE KITCHEN WISDOM OF CECILIA CHIANG
The Long Walk

THE KITCHEN WISDOM OF CECILIA CHIANG: The Long Walk

 

In 1937, the Japanese invaded China and by 1939 they arrived in Beijing, seizing most of the large family compound and with it, Cecilia’s idyllic and privileged youth. By 1941 there wasn’t enough food for the family so Cecilia and her number five sister (she had nine in total), fled on foot through Japanese occupied territory. They walked more than 1,000 miles and it took almost six months to reach the safety of “Free China.” In this episode, Cecilia joins Laurence Jossel, chef and owner of Nopa. Like Cecilia, South African-born Jossel came a long way to open a restaurant in San Francisco. Cecilia shows Laurence how to make “beggar’s chicken,” a whole, stuffed chicken wrapped in lotus leaves and then clay, and baked for at least two hours. It comes out of the oven with a hard shell that must be smashed with a mallet to open.

 

This Land Is Your Land

 

Take a musical journey through the evolution of modern American folk music, from its roots in bluegrass to San Francisco coffee houses to clubs in Greenwich Village. Hosted by the Smothers Brothers and Judy Collins, this program features The Brothers Four, Glenn Yarbrough, The Highwaymen, The Limeliters, Randy Sparks and The Minstrels, and Roger McGuinn from The Byrds.

 

Kaneko’s Monumental Risk

 

This documentary explores the life and work of Japanese-American sculptor and artist Jun Kaneko. Kaneko is known for building the largest ceramic art pieces in the world, with some towering more than 13 feet without any interior support. Over the course of his 50-year career, Kaneko has created massive public art installations in plazas, gardens, airports, city parks and convention centers. The film follows Kaneko working around the world in places like San Francisco, Kyoto, New York, Nagoya, Chicago, Puerto Vallarta and his adopted hometown of Omaha. It also looks at the evolution of his work from painting in a realistic style to his abstract sculptures to his risky opera design with the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute.

 

The profile culminates with a look at the multi-million dollar creativity center he built in Omaha to encourage people to unleash our risk-taking and creative sides.

 

LUCKY CHOW
Bay Area’s Pacific Rim Cuisine

 

THE BAY AREA’S PACIFIC RIM CUISINE, as personified by Google
, The Bay Area is perhaps the most Asian of any population outside of Asia. We visit the world headquarters for Google, which was founded in Silicon Valley in the South Bay city of Mountain View. Where “peach” orchards ran abundant just a generation ago, “Apple” (Computers) are now dominating and disrupting how the world functions. We meet with Olivia Wu, who designed the original Asian restaurant concepts “on campus”, including the home-style “Jia”, which remains one of the most popular restaurants on campus. We go behind the scenes with Baadal, Google’s first “sit-down” restaurant, which happens to be Indian, as we participate in the assembly line process that churns out 2,000 servings of the Indian fried rice dish, “Biryani” on “Biryani Fridays”. Driving away from Google, we visit some of their purveyors, who epitomize the ethos of the Bay Area food culture – which is local, seasonal and sustainable. We visit two retired Japanese semiconductor executives, who have constructed an indoor, vertical farm called Ecopia – which not only services some of the top restaurants in the Bay Area, but also uses a mere 3% of water vs traditional farming techniques, as they seek to redefine farming culture in the midst of global warming. After a career in Silicon Valley running Fortune 500 companies, they are returning to their original immigrant roots as farmers, right here before Silicon Valley was birthed. We end the episode at Hodo Soy Beanery, which started out making artisanal tofu products for a handful and has now proliferated into the mainstream just as Asian food products and palates have gone mainstream.

 

SUPPER CLUB
San Francisco, Part Two

SUPPER CLUB: San Francisco, Part Two

 

Chef Alvin Leung continues his visit to the Bay Area by trading skills with Chef Corey Lee of Benu. He invents a new dish with Adam Mali of Mandarin Oriental Hotel and strolls in Sonoma Valley with winemaker Korbin Ming.

 

SUPPER CLUB
San Francisco, Part One

SUPPER CLUB: San Francisco. Alvin Leung

 

Join Michelin Three Star Chef Alvin Leung as he cooks with Chef Michael Mina and Chef Ken Tominaga and shares their food philosophies. Chef Leung also samples the Marin County Farmers Market’s produce with Adam Mali of Mandarin Oriental Hotel.

 

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