Month: February 2015

70s & 80s Soul Rewind


Host Whoopi Goldberg introduces the smooth, sexy and sophisticated sounds of the greatest groups and solo artists from the 70s and 80s in this new special. Featured artists include Lou Rawls, The Stylistics, The Chi-Lites, Lionel Richie, Bill Withers and many others.

 

MASTERPIECE CLASSIC
Downton Abbey, Season 5, Part 9 of 9


This Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning hit drama returns for a fifth season of intimately interlaced stories centered on an English country estate – an entertaining formula that has made “Downton Abbey” the highest-rated drama in PBS history. The acclaimed ensemble cast is joined by guest stars Harriet Walter as Lady Shackleton and Peter Egan as Lord Flintshire, together with new characters played by Richard E. Grant, Anna Chancellor and Rade Sherbedgia.

Part 9 of 9
The Crawleys go to a shooting party at a castle in Northumberland and return to Downton for Christmas holida

 

THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW
Final

 

Follow the trials and tribulations of passionate amateur bakers whose goal is to be named the U.K.’s best. Each week, the bakers tackle a different skill, the difficulty of which increases as the competition unfolds. Mary Berry, a leading cookbook writer, and Paul Hollywood, a top artisan baker, serve as judges. Together with hosts and comic foils Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc, Berry and Hollywood search for the country’s best amateur baker by testing the competitors’ skills on cakes, breads, pastries and desserts, crowning a winner after 10 weeks of competition.

 

Final
Just three challenges lie between the three finalists and the trophy. And what a trio of challenges they are: mastery of a classic pastry technique that normally takes a day – in just three hours; a Technical test that requires mastering the basics – with no recipe; and a Showstopper that demands delivery of perfect sponge, caramel, choux pastry and petit four in the bakers’ final five hours in the tent.

 

Sharon Isbin:
Troubadour


Acclaimed for her extraordinary lyricism, technique and versatility, Sharon Isbin is considered one of today’s pre-eminent classical guitarists. Isbin’s catalogue of more than 25 recordings – ranging from Baroque, folk and Latin to rock, pop and jazz-fusion – reflects her remarkable versatility. Combining performance and documentary, the film focuses on Isbin’s unusual and inspiring musical journey, including her struggles working in a traditionally male-dominated field. We also see Isbin’s role as teacher to a new generation of guitarists at both The Julliard School, where she created the first guitar department, and the Aspen Music Festival.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Housing or Agriculture: Which Does Hawai‘i Need More?


Development on the ‘Ewa Plain and in Central Oahu has created controversy over whether agricultural lands should be rezoned for housing projects. Proposed housing projects point toward building communities that help create jobs and provide housing for Hawai‘i residents. Agriculture can help increase Hawai‘i’s locally grown food stock, while also preserving open space. Does one use better meet the needs of our state than the other? Housing or Agriculture: Which Does Hawai‘i Need More? Mahealani Richardson hosts this discussion on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is being hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui profile Kathryn Peterson, who has volunteered to help in the training of assistance dogs since she was 10 years old. The Seabury Hall senior is passionate about the service that assistance dogs provide for people with disabilities, enabling them to lead more independent and fulfilling lives.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School on Oahu share the story of their school principal, Alvin Parker, who served as a crewmember on the Aotearoa (New Zealand) leg of Hokulea’s World Wide Voyage, helping to promote the message of malama honua, or caring for the Earth; students from Kapaa High School on Kauai capture the lively activities that abound at their town’s monthly street fair; students from Kamehameha Schools Kapalama High School on Oahu feature Imiah Tafaovale, a Kamehameha sophomore who finds a convenient way to forgo the long school commutes that were robbing her of sleep; students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island document the creation of a community mural that showcases the cultural values of West Hawaii; students from Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island tell the story of Thomas “Tom Tom” Pahio, a Waipio taro farmer whose loi, or taro patches, serve both as an outdoor classroom for students and as test beds for taro varieties that can resist new environmental threats.

 

HIKI NŌ: What I Learned

PBS Hawai‘i - HIKI NŌ: What I Learned

 

HIKI NŌ (which is the Hawaiian phrase for “Can Do”) is a PBS Hawai‘i Learning Initiative that mentors middle and high schoolers from public, charter, and private schools throughout the state of Hawai‘i as they create PBS-quality video stories about themselves and their communities. Stories that meet PBS standards are compiled into a weekly half-hour program that airs statewide on PBS Hawai‘i and worldwide on pbshawaii.org

 

Through the rigorous, trial-and-error process of creating a story that meets PBS standards, students learn the following survival skills for the 21st century: critical thinking and problem-solving; collaboration across networks and leading by influence; agility and adaptability; initiative and entrepreneurialism; effective oral and written communication; accessing and analyzing information; curiosity and imagination.

 

The completed HIKI NŌ stories show only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to revealing the students’ overall learning experience. To help illuminate the process, PBS Hawai‘i has produced short, “What I Learned” mini-docs about what students experienced during the production of selected HIKI NŌ stories. To view these “What I Learned” mini-docs and their corresponding HIKI NŌ stories, click on the school names below.

 

EARTH A NEW WILD
Water

 

New

This five-part series takes a fresh look at humankind’s relationship to the planet’s wildest places and most fascinating species. Dr. M. Sanjayan, a leading conservation scientist, takes viewers on a stunning visual journey to explore how humans are inextricably woven into every aspect of the planet’s natural systems. The series features spectacular natural history footage from the most striking places on Earth, filming encounters between wild animals and the people who live and work with them. With up-close looks at a range of species, from giant pandas to humpback whales and African lions to Arctic reindeer, Sanjayan reveals that co-habitations with animals can work – and be mutually beneficial.

Water
Dr. Sanjayan explores humankind’s relationship with the Earth’s most important resource: water. Unraveling dramatic connections between fresh water and the health of the planet, he uncovers spectacular wildlife stories that center on managing the natural pulse of the planet’s water. The episode includes a kayak journey that follows the Colorado River to the sea; the elephants and people at the “singing wells” of Kenya; the connection between AIDS and a small fish in Lake Malawi; and a look at how hunters in America saved one of the greatest gatherings of birds on the continent.

NOVA
Hagia Sophia: Istanbul’s Ancient Mystery


Istanbul’s magnificent Hagia Sophia has survived on one of the world’s most active seismic faults, which has inflicted a dozen devastating earthquakes since Hagia Sophia was built in 537 AD. As Istanbul braces for the next big quake, a team of architects and engineers is investigating Hagia Sophia’s seismic survival secrets. NOVA follows the team’s discoveries as they examine the building’s unique structure and other ingenious design strategies that have insured the dome’s survival. The engineers build a massive eight-ton model of the building’s core structure, place it on a motorized shake table and hit it with a series of simulated quakes.

 

THE MIND OF A CHEF
Japan


Join executive producer and narrator Anthony Bourdain as he takes viewers inside the mind of noted Korean American chef and restaurateur David Chang, a New York Times best-selling author and chef-owner of the Momofuku restaurant group. Chang brings a voracious appetite for food knowledge and a youthful exuberance to cooking and travel, whether cooking in his kitchens in New York and Australia or traveling for inspiration to Japan, Denmark, Spain or Montreal.

Japan
David Chang travels from Tokyo to Kyoto to meet and eat with friends. He visits a street market in Tokyo and finishes the trip at a Michelin three-star restaurant, Kikunoi.

 

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