Waianae Intermediate School

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Ike pono

This episode is the fifth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘ike pono, which means to know what is right. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui Waena Intermediate School who feature Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often in trouble with the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. His motivation for opening the business was not to make money, but to provide his family and community with healthy snacks, to employ people who need a helping hand (like he did), and to encourage his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods. “I went from someone who wasn’t doing Maui any good to someone who is making a difference,” says Cousins.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sosefina Matautia, once a self-professed bully at Waianae Intermediate School, decided to do the right thing and change her ways. While becoming a kinder, better person benefitted those around her, Sosefina was motivated to change because of her own dreams of someday becoming a doctor.

 

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui): Led by math teacher Debi Davis, Seabury Hall Middle School students do the right thing for the less fortunate by weaving colorful yarn hats that are distributed around the world to help brighten the lives of underprivileged children.

 

Kealakehe High School (Hawaii Island): Students and other community members in Kona do the right thing by banding together to build Habitat for Humanity homes for families on the Hawaiian Homes wait list.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): Sometimes doing what you know is right requires great sacrifice. Sometimes doing what is right means doing less for yourself. Such is the case with Waianae High School student Daisy Agae, whose grades suffer because she has to take care of her two younger brothers, one of whom is a special needs child born with debilitating medical conditions.

 

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (Hawaii Island): Hawaii Island resident William ”Black” Abraham was headed down the wrong path as a young adult, until he decided to do the right thing and dedicate his life to saving lives. He did so by becoming an Ocean Safety Officer at Hapuna Beach and is now inspiring the next generation of lifesavers through his Junior Lifeguard training program.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui High (Maui): An East Maui couple do the right thing by taking in and caring for animals with debilitating and life-threatening illnesses. As a result, their home has become the East Maui Animal Refuge, more affectionately known as the Boo-Boo Zoo. This episode is hosted by Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #814 – Best Overall Story, Middle School Division

 

The sixth in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for Best Overall Story, Middle School Division:

 

–“Dog Wheelchair” by Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i;

 

–“Firefighter” by Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i;

 

–“Steel Guitar” by Ka Waihona o Ka Na‘auao Public Charter School on O‘ahu;

 

–“Haleakala Mules” by Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui;

 

–“A Home for Larenzo” by Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu.

 

This episode is hosted by Noah Faumuina from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Kukui Raymond from Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, March 4 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, March 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS RESULTS

HIKI NŌ Awards Nominees March 23, 2017

 

The 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards

PBS Hawai‘i recognizes exceptional storytelling skills of middle and high school students throughout our Islands who participate in HIKI NŌ, our statewide digital learning initiative and student news program.

 

The nominees were chosen from HIKI NŌ shows that aired during the 2015-2016 school year and the Fall Semester of this current school year. You can view each nominated piece by clicking on its name in the list below. (You can also watch the nominated projects, by category, Thursdays at 7:30 pm, Saturdays at noon, and Sundays at 3:00 pm on PBS Hawai’i.)

 

This year’s Gold, Silver and Bronze winners are indicated below. Winning stories, as well as highlights from this year’s awards celebrations, will be featured on our two-part 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards Show, Thursday, March 23 and Thursday, March 30 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i. Congratulations to all nominees and winners – and mahalo to all the students, teachers and mentors who help make HIKI NŌ a success in our public, private and charter schools throughout Hawai‘i.

 


 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Homeschooled Student” SILVER

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Moses Hamilton” GOLD

Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu) – “Laurie Rubin” BRONZE

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Joe Young”

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “John Plunkett”

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Bipolar Artist”

James Campbell High School (O‘ahu) – “Miracle Baby” GOLD

Maui High School (Maui) – “Marc Unites”

Mid-Pacific (O‘ahu) – “Ukulele Hale” BRONZE

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Living With Pain” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Front Office”

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “K-9 Search & Rescue” GOLD

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui) – “Feed My Sheep”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Love Laundry” BRONZE

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui) – “Airconditioning”

Mililani Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Mokauea Island” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kapolei High School (O‘ahu) – “Best Buddies Basketball”

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Biomass” GOLD

Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy PCS (Hawai‘i Island) – “Opelu Fishing” BRONZE

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “Text Neck” SILVER

Saint Francis School (O‘ahu) – “Lucy’s Lab Creamery”

Waiakea High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Cosplay”

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Dog Wheelchair”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Firefighter”

Ka Waihona o Ka Naʻauao PCS (O‘ahu) – “Steel Guitar” BRONZE

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “Haleakala Mules” SILVER

Wai‘anae Intermediate School (O‘ahu)– “A Home For Larenzo” GOLD

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Life After Sugar”

Kapa‘a High School (Kaua‘i) – “Iloreta Brothers” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “A Love Story”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Deaf Cheerleader” BRONZE

Waiʻanae High School (O‘ahu) – “Without Home” SILVER

 

BEST FRANCHISE PIECE

Hana K-12 (Maui) – “Ti Leaf Print”

Kalani High School (O‘ahu) – “Thaumatrope”

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “10 Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone” GOLD

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Hurricane Protection” BRONZE

Moloka‘i High School (Moloka‘i) “Text-A-Tip

Pacific Buddhist Academy (O‘ahu) – “Offering Incense” SILVER

 

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY & EDITING

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Junior Lifeguard”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Tourette” GOLD

Moanalua High School (O‘ahu) – “Equestrian” SILVER

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “IUCN”

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Parental Guidance Required” BRONZE

 

BEST FACTOID

Hana K-12  (Maui) – “School History”

Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy (Hawai‘i Island) – “Solar Trees” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Wildcats”

Mililani High School (O‘ahu) – “Red Dirt” BRONZE

President William McKinley High School (O‘ahu) – “School Spirit” SILVER

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #804

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Dustin Alfiler, Hanalei Fire Department captain, and the important role his family plays in balancing out his life. When he is off duty his family comes first, and he expresses how their commitment supports him in his often precarious and dangerous profession.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Wai‘anae Intermediate School tell the story of a former media student who finds purpose in his life as a media teacher at the Wai‘anae Boys and Girls Club.

 

Students at Kalani High School in East O‘ahu demonstrate how to make a thaumatrope – a simple device made from paper and string that creates rudimentary forms of animation.

 

Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu tell of youth involvement at the recent World Conservation Congress held at the Hawai’i State Convention Center. Their story includes an interview with U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell.

 

Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo introduce us to the hard-hitting, elbow-jabbing world of women’s roller derby.

 

And students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu introduce us to a young equestrian who has dedicated her life to the riding and care of horses.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 10 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 11 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: Mālama

 

This episode is the final in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is mālama, which means to care for, protect and maintain.

 

The top story comes from the students at Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu, who report on the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its community of volunteers to mālama the Hawaiian Monk Seal.

 

Also featured are student stories from the following schools:

 

Seabury Hall Upper School (Maui): Paul Higashino of the Kahoolawe Island Reserve Commission welcomes and relies on the valuable assistance from volunteers in restoration and re-vegetation efforts on Kahoolawe Island, which for decades was used as a target in military exercises.

 

Kauai High School (Kauai): Students cover five key steps in preparing for a hurricane.

 

Maui High School (Maui): Maui resident Martha Watkins learns valuable lessons from caring for her Alzheimer’s Disease-stricken mother.

 

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kauai): Residents of Kauai mālama the traditional process practiced by their ancestors for generations of collecting pa’a’kai – sea salt –from a salt pond in Hanapepe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Students at Waianae Intermediate School mālama students with severe disabilities by acting as peer tutors in their adapted physical education class.

 

Punahou School (Oahu): Punahou Student Dakota Miller, the youngest beekeeper in Hawaii, cares for an apiary to help protect Hawaii’s dwindling bee population.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui): A community rebuilds Koieie Loko Ia, an ancient, royal fishpond in Kihei, Maui.

 

This episode is hosted by Hana K-12 School in Hana, Maui.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 10 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 81 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Imi na’auao

 

This episode is the fourth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘imi na’auao, or enlightenment and wisdom. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. They feature Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people, learning culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Kamehameha School Kapalama (Oahu): This story shows how exploring a tumultuous and traumatic episode from the past can enlighten the next generation on how not to repeat history. Here students at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama study and discuss the Bishop Estate “Broken Trust” controversy that led to positive change and transparency in the trust that manages their schools.

 

Wheeler Middle School (Oahu): Enlightenment and wisdom can come from seeing beyond stereotypes and getting to know people for who they really are. In this story from Wheeler Middle School, a military dependent and a local boy become friends, despite each of their pre-conceived ideas of what the other was “supposed” to be like.

 

Kawananakoa Middle School (Oahu): Veteran boxing coach Joel Kim bestows gems of wisdom onto his young boxing protégés. If experience is the best teacher, then Kim has earned a PhD from the School of Hard Knocks.

 

Konawaena High School (Hawaii Island): Live theatre can be a great tool of enlightenment. Such was the case when a stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank enlightened students on the Kona Coast of Hawaii Island about the persecution of Jews in World War II Europe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sometimes the best way to learn about something we know little of is to witness it first-hand. Few middle schoolers have had the experience of knowing someone who is transitioning from the gender they were born with into that of the opposite sex. But when a student at Waianae Intermediate School decided to transition from a boy to a girl, fellow students, teachers, and school administrators became part of a unique process of learning and enlightenment.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): Some teenagers are wise beyond their years. Roosevelt High School student Satoshi Sugiyama learned through observation that in this age of the internet and social media, the most important connections still happen face-to-face…especially over a cup of freshly brewed coffee.

 

This episode is hosted by Kua O Ka La Public Charter School on Hawaii Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 7 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaian Value: Ho’omau

 

This is the premiere episode of HIKI NŌ Season 7, and the first in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value.

 

The Hawaiian value for this show is ho’omau, which means to persevere, perpetuate, or continue.

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui High School, who follow former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia is used to contesting opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan. But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere against an enemy she is not familiar with: uncertainty.

 

Also featured are these student stories:
Roosevelt High School on Oahu tell the story of Papahana Kuaola, a non-profit organization in Kaneohe that contributes to the preservation of Hawaiian culture through the preservation of land and native plants, public awareness and the use of chant.

 

Kapolei High School on Oahu profile Kapolei football player Papu Uti, who lost his leg from a debilitating accident but expects to return to playing football with a prosthetic leg.

 

Connections Public Charter School on Hawaii Island feature world-renowned slack key guitarist Cyril Pahinui, who continues his father Gabby Pahinui’s legacy by using his father’s teaching methods at workshops.

 

Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauai tells the story of teacher Hope Kaimi Strickland who, raised on Niihau Island, honors her deceased husband’s wishes for their children to learn her Hawaiian culture and Niihau Hawaiian dialect.

 

Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu feature fellow student Crystal Cebedo. Crystal deals with the uncontrollable aspects of her life, such as her mother’s cancer, by keeping busy and meeting life’s challenges.

 

Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island shows us how the Kona Historical Society built an authentic, old-fashioned Portuguese oven for baking bread as a part of its efforts to recreate the traditions of old Kona.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Radford High School on Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 6 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Aug. 7 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Kapaa High School: Shave Ice

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapaa High School on Kauai report on an organic, 21st Century twist on an iconic Hawaii treat – shave ice. For decades, shave ice, brought to Hawaii by the Japanese, consisted of brightly and artificially colored syrup on shaved ice in a paper cone. Today, entrepreneurs on Kauai have created a new niche with a supposedly healthier, all-natural, no-food-coloring-added version of this classic refreshment. And speaking of favorite island treats, we’ll visit the HIKI NŌ archives for a Waiakea High School (Hawaii Island) story about a family-run business that adds Technicolor to traditional Japanese mochi.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Waianae Intermediate School in West Oahu tell the inspiring story of their after-school activities director’s weight-loss journey.

 

Students at Hongwanji Mission School on Oahu introduce us to a blind singer who dispels some common myths about what it’s like to live without sight.

 

Students at Hana K-12 School in East Maui show us how to make beautiful prints with something found in most Hawaii backyards.

 

And students at Campbell High School on Oahu present a fresh, expressionistic approach to telling the story of a young woman with cerebral palsy.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 18 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 19 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 





HIKI NŌ
Focus on Generation Z

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the winter quarter of the 2015-16 school year. Besides being excellent stories, the features in this compilation were also selected for how they reflect the values of Generation Z: people born in 1995 or later. HIKI NŌ students, currently middle and high schoolers, are part of Generation Z. National surveys show that, in general, Gen Z-ers are tech-savvy entrepreneurs who are very aware of the world’s problems and are looking for practical ways to solve them. They are empathetic to others, socially conscious, tend not be gender or age biased and share an affinity with senior citizens.

 

The stories featured in this compilation, along with the Gen Z trends they reflect, are:

 

“A Home for Larenzo” (Waianae Intermediate School – Oahu)
A student leader at the Waianae Boys and Girls Club is found to be homeless.
Gen Z trend: They are growing up in a post 9/11 world during a recession, with 1 in 4 American children living in poverty.

 

“Science Teacher” (Sacred Hearts Academy – Oahu)
A female science teacher at an all-girls school receives national recognition from President Obama.
Gen Z trend: Traditional gender roles are being challenged.

 

“Ukulele Hale” (Mid-Pacific – Oahu)
An ukulele virtuoso decides to open his own music school rather than be employed by someone else’s school.
Gen Z trend: Entrepreneurship is in their DNA.

 

“Dog Wheelchair” (Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School – Kauai)
An 8th grade girl uses an engineering app to design and build a wheelchair for her disabled dog.
Gen Z trend: They use technology to solve problems.

 

“Deaf Cheerleader” (Maui High School – Maui)
A deaf high school student is determined to do everything her hearing peers can do, including being part of the Junior Varsity cheerleading squad.
Gen Z trend: They are empathetic and accepting of differences.

 

“Joe Young” (Kapaa Middle School – Kauai)
A retired police officer beats prostate cancer without surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. His cure: leading a happy life.
Gen Z trend: They have a great affinity and respect for elders.

 

“Iloreta Brothers” (Kapaa High School – Kauai)
A young man with Cerebral Palsy and his brother participate in long distance runs to promote their social awareness campaign called “I Am My Ability, I Am Not My Disability.”
Gen Z trend: They exhibit social entrepreneurship.

 

This edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by HIKI NŌ alumna, University of Hawaii at Manoa Communications/Political Science major, and Gen Z-er Shisa Kahaunaele.

 

This program encores Saturday, April 9 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, April 10 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by McKinley High School

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Kapaa High School on Kauai tell the story of Joshua and Jason Iloreta, two brothers who train and compete together in long-distance running races. To most people his does not seem unusual, until they find out that older brother Joshua has cerebral palsy – a neurological disorder that appears in infancy or early childhood and permanently affects body movement and muscle coordination. Jason pushes Joshua in a race-designed wheelchair as he runs. Their goal is to someday do a full marathon together. Their participation in long-distance races is part of an awareness campaign the brothers started which they call “I Am My Ability, I Am Not My Disability.” Their intent is to spread awareness that cerebral palsy does not impair people’s cognition and intelligence and that they can lead fulfilling and productive lives with the condition.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School in Central Oahu tell the story of Lorenzo Taguro-Bear, a very outgoing young leader who, unbeknownst to his peers and advisors at the Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii, used to live in a homeless encampment in Waianae.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai present a primer on how to make friends.

 

Students at the private all-girl school Sacred Hearts Academy in Kaimuki feature their science teacher Erin Flynn, who inspires her students to shatter the stereotype that science is for boys.

 

Expanding on the theme of breaking gender-based stereotypes, we revisit a story from the HIKI NŌ archives by Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu about a girls’ flight school.

 

Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui feature John Plunkett, who tells the heartfelt story of his family’s deep connection to their homeland of Kihei, Maui.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by McKinley High School.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 5 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 6 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

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