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PBS HAWAII PRESENTS
The Quietest Place on Earth

 

On the island of Maui, Haleakala rises 10,000 feet – nearly two miles – into the sky. The massive crater located at its summit carries the unique distinction of being “the quietest place on Earth.” The exquisite stillness of its stark volcanic landscape inspires a variety of experiences ranging from spiritual to philosophical. Featured are musical artist Keola Beamer, poet W.S. Merwin, cultural specialist Clifford Nae’ole, paniolo Wilfred Souza and others.

 

Oregon Revealed: Coastal Wonder

 

This travelogue highlights Oregon’s stunning landscapes and spectacular coastline stretching from the bridges of Astoria to the rolling dunes of Bandon. Featured on this dramatic aerial tour are cliffs, estuaries, ports and small towns, including Tillamook Bay, Cape Kiwanda, Coos Bay and more.

 

Strategy from a Swordfighter

Musashi Miyamoto, right, as depicted by artist Yoshitaki Tsunejiro

 

Musashi Minamoto, right, as depicted by artist Yoshitake Tsunejiro.

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiOne of the greatest swordfighters in history comes to mind as PBS Hawai‘i sets out to draft a new strategic plan to guide us in a rapidly changing media environment.

 

“Do nothing which is of no use,” wrote samurai Musashi Miyamoto, when he wasn’t roaming Japan wielding two swords, facing enemies in the Edo period.

 

Yes, Miyamoto-San, we must decide what skills and habits of mind we need to take with us into the future, in order to serve up great content on the many viewing screens in people’s lives. Folks might want to lean back for an hour-long documentary on a big wall monitor; catch a one-minute clip on their smartphone; or participate in a globally interactive discussion on their tablet. In fact, it’s already become common for people to use two digital devices at the same time to access content.

 

“Perception is strong and sight weak. In strategy, it is important to see distant things as if they were close and to take a distanced view of close things.” So true, Minamoto-San, as we clear the bias of the present moment and attempt to see with clarity how we and fellow Islanders will want to use media and storytelling in the years ahead. Our organization used to peer ahead five years; now, even trying to pin down the next three years in this industry seems foolhardy.

 

In meetings held so far, our Board of Directors, Staff and stakeholders agree that PBS Hawai‘i must create a far-reaching system of touch points for people to encounter our programming. We’ll go where people are, rather than wait for them on a television monitor. We’ll continue to broadcast. However, many more people will want to engage in content online, selecting what they want to see when they want to see it. We want that, too.

 

First and foremost, we’re storytellers. We can and will adapt, to meet the need for quality stories and interactivity in different ways on different digital devices.

 

“Fixation is the way to death. Fluidity is the way to life,” wrote Miyamoto, who was known for anticipating an opponent’s moves and unleashing unexpected moves to bring victory.

 

However, the future isn’t all about fluidity and change. Like many of our viewers, we intend to hold onto our mindsets of curiosity, discovery, resilience, fairness; our belief in exposure to diverse viewpoints and civil discourse; and the value of universal access to education and reliable information.

 

When our Board of Directors adopts a new strategic plan at mid-year, we’ll share the plan with you and count on your feedback as we evolve. As Miyamoto-San said, “It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first.”

 

At least we don’t run the risk of sword injuries! We do stand a fighting chance of creating richer and more versatile viewing experiences for you.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Millennials Are Transforming the Workplace

 

With baby boomers edging into retirement and an influx of young adults entering the workforce, INSIGHTS examines how Millennials are transforming the workplace. By 2020, nearly half of the U.S. workforce could be Millennials. Born roughly between 1980 and 2000, this tech-savvy generation is coming into Hawai‘i’s work world with different expectations and sensibilities than the boomers and Generation X’ers before them.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

BIG BLUE LIVE


 

Big Blue Live
Mon., Aug. 31, 2:00 pm, encore at 8:00 pm
Tues., Sept. 1, 2:00 pm, encore at 8:00 pm
Wed., Sept. 2, 2:00 pm, encore at 8:00 pm

 

Join scientists, animal behaviorists and other experts in a live TV broadcast to view the once endangered, now thriving ecosystem of Monterey Bay, California. A coproduction between the BBC and PBS, this three part series will air live over three afternoons at 2:00 pm Hawaii time, with encores featuring updated content each evening at 8:00 pm.

 

Scientists, filmmakers, photographers and other experts will come together to film some of the world’s most charismatic marine creatures – humpback whales, sea lions, dolphins, elephant seals, sea otters, great white sharks, shearwaters, brown pelicans, blue whales and more – gathering at this time of year in Monterey Bay to feed on the abundance of food in these waters. Monterey Bay’s unique underwater geography, with a deep ocean canyon close to shore, brings species by the thousands into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Viewers can watch one of nature’s great reality shows, delivered through state-of-the-art filming technologies and live reports from air, by boat and below the waves, broadcast from the Monterey Bay Aquarium and from aboard Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary vessels, as well as from Monterey shoreline locations.

 

Dr. Wayne Dyer:
I Can See Clearly Now

 

In the most personal program of his career, Dr. Wayne Dyer offers an intimate conversation about what his own personal experiences have taught him: There are no accidents, and all the choices we make and actions we take weave a life tapestry uniquely our own. Exploring the five principles that have guided his own choices, Dr. Dyer shows why it is important to have – and act on – a burning desire, why life’s lowest moments can reveal our true purpose, and how the principle of love allows us to see our lives more clearly and reach our greatest awareness.