Vietnamese

Asian American Life

 

This news magazine series features in-depth reports and stories of the Asian American diaspora for a general audience.

 

Asian American Life is an in-depth news magazine program that addresses topical issues affecting the Asian American communities nationwide and profiles Asian American leaders.

 

Giap’s Last Day at the Ironing Board Factory

 

In 1975, Giap, a pregnant Vietnamese refugee, escapes Saigon in a boat and within weeks is working on an assembly line in Indiana. Decades later, her aspiring filmmaker son documents her final day of work at America’s last ironing board factory.

 

Stateless

 

Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Duc H. Nguyen follows the stories of Vietnamese refugees who have been living in a condition of statelessness in the Philippines for 16 years while awaiting a rare opportunity for resettlement in the United States.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Last Days in Vietnam

 

During the chaotic final days of the Vietnam War, as the North Vietnamese Army closed in on Saigon, the South Vietnamese resistance crumbled. The United States had only a skeleton crew of diplomats and military operatives still in the country. With a communist victory inevitable and the U.S. readying to withdraw, many Americans on the ground worried their South Vietnamese allies and friends faced imprisonment or death at the hands of the approaching North Vietnamese. With the clock ticking and the city under fire, a number of heroic Americans took matters into their own hands, engaging in unsanctioned and often makeshift operations in a desperate effort to save as many South Vietnamese as possible. A film by Rory Kennedy.

 

FRONTLINE
Terror in Little Saigon

 

Join the search for assassins behind a reign of terror targeting Vietnamese-American journalists. FRONTLINE and ProPublica investigate a series of unsolved murders and attacks, uncovering a trail from American cities to jungles in Southeast Asia.

 

THE MIND OF A CHEF
American

 

American cuisine has come to be known as much more than just burgers and hot dogs. Chef Ed Lee heads to Brooklyn’s Chinatown for some ingredients, then to the kitchen to make jop chai, a Thai stew. Later, Ed visits Houston, Texas, and makes a crispy fish fresh from the Gulf of Mexico and Filipino kinilaw (raw fish salad). A sweat-inducing crawfish dinner in a Vietnamese joint exemplifies how Creole, Cajun, Mexican, and Asian flavors blend with the Gulf’s bounty, effectively creating an entirely new American cuisine.