value

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY
The Goldsmith

 

Host Eric Gorges combs the country for America’s finest craftsmen, documenting what it means to be a modern-day maker. In each episode, Eric explains the history of an old-world craft as it is practiced in America today.

 

The Goldsmith
Eric visits goldsmith Susan McDonough, who works in a small studio on her family’s farm in the mountains. Susan describes working in kitchens and bakeries, as a school-bus driver, EMT, firefighter and librarian, on her long journey to becoming a goldsmith.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Salt Lake City, UT, Part 2 of 3

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Salt Lake City, UT, Part 2 of 3

 

Explore Salt Lake City and discover hidden treasures like a Cartier Art Deco diamond bracelet, a Zee Wo Silver & Cinnabar cutlery set, ca. 1920, and a 1959 Number 1 Barbie doll and accessories. Which is valued for up to $100,000?

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Imi na’auao

 

This episode is the fourth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘imi na’auao, or enlightenment and wisdom. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. They feature Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people, learning culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Kamehameha School Kapalama (Oahu): This story shows how exploring a tumultuous and traumatic episode from the past can enlighten the next generation on how not to repeat history. Here students at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama study and discuss the Bishop Estate “Broken Trust” controversy that led to positive change and transparency in the trust that manages their schools.

 

Wheeler Middle School (Oahu): Enlightenment and wisdom can come from seeing beyond stereotypes and getting to know people for who they really are. In this story from Wheeler Middle School, a military dependent and a local boy become friends, despite each of their pre-conceived ideas of what the other was “supposed” to be like.

 

Kawananakoa Middle School (Oahu): Veteran boxing coach Joel Kim bestows gems of wisdom onto his young boxing protégés. If experience is the best teacher, then Kim has earned a PhD from the School of Hard Knocks.

 

Konawaena High School (Hawaii Island): Live theatre can be a great tool of enlightenment. Such was the case when a stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank enlightened students on the Kona Coast of Hawaii Island about the persecution of Jews in World War II Europe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sometimes the best way to learn about something we know little of is to witness it first-hand. Few middle schoolers have had the experience of knowing someone who is transitioning from the gender they were born with into that of the opposite sex. But when a student at Waianae Intermediate School decided to transition from a boy to a girl, fellow students, teachers, and school administrators became part of a unique process of learning and enlightenment.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): Some teenagers are wise beyond their years. Roosevelt High School student Satoshi Sugiyama learned through observation that in this age of the internet and social media, the most important connections still happen face-to-face…especially over a cup of freshly brewed coffee.

 

This episode is hosted by Kua O Ka La Public Charter School on Hawaii Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 7 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: Ha’aha’a

 

This episode is the third in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ha’aha’a, which means humbleness and humility. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai. They feature a Kauai resident named Moses Hamilton who learned humbleness and humility when he had to start all over again after a tragic car accident that left him a quadraplegic. While undergoing re-hab, Moses took up mouth painting (painting by holding and manipulating the paint brush in one’s mouth), and is a now a successful artist who sells his paintings at a shopping mall in Hanalei, Kauai.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Ka Waihona o Ka Naauao (Oahu): Uncle George, a native Hawaiian stand-up paddle board instructor in West Oahu, exemplifies humbleness by giving away something of great value – paddle board lessons – for free.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): A Roosevelt High School student uses his experience growing up in poverty-stricken countries to instill a sense of humility in his fellow students.

 

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui): A retiree-turned-elementary-school crossing guard proves that a humbleness of spirit comes in handy when dedicating your life to the safety of young children in your community.

 

Mililani Middle School (Oahu): After years in the spotlight as star quarterback for the UH football team, Garrett Gabriel choses the much more humble profession of counseling.

 

Iolani School (Oahu): The value of ha’aha’a, or humbleness, teaches us that we are neither indestructible nor immortal. This realization may have saved the life of a coach at Iolani School.
Waianae High School (Oahu): This story explores how a family in West Oahu deals with a very humbling experience: the onset of dementia in the family matriarch.

 

This episode is hosted by Aiea High School in Honolulu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 20 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 21 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, PBSHawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: Kuleana

 

This episode is the second in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is kuleana, which means responsibility. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Waianae High School in West Oahu. They feature Waianae High School graduate and UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fighter Max Holloway, who feels it is his kuleana to represent the Waianae community in the most positive way possible when he competes. Max also takes his responsibilities to his wife and young son very seriously. Having been severely neglected by his own parents, Max wants to make sure his son does not have to suffer the same sort of childhood.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama (Oahu): A one-day community service event for Kamehameha Schools Kapalama seniors builds character and nurtures lifelong community service.

 

Kainalu Elementary School (Oahu): Student Caleb McCrillis was concerned when his great grandmother became the victim of a phone scam. He felt it was his kuleana to warn other senior citizens about phone scams and produced a PSA offering tips on how seniors can avoid being conned.

 

Aliamanu Middle School (Oahu): Students and teachers at Aliamanu Middle School take responsibility and raise awareness of the hazards for pedestrians jaywalking near a major intersection in Salt Lake.

 

Keaau High School (Hawaii Island): Keith “Brudda Skibs” Nehls starts the non-profit organization, Basic Image, that maintains Honolii and other Hawaii Island parks for free.

 

Ewa Makai Middle School (Oahu): Although it has earned him a reputation as the meanest teacher at Ewa Makai Middle School, science teacher David Wong has made it his kuleana to teach his students what they need to succeed in high school and beyond.

 

Moanalua High School (Oahu): Moanalua High School student Jacob Genovese deals with the responsibilities and challenges of fatherhood, full-time work and school.

 

This episode is hosted by Kaimuki High School in Honolulu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 13 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 14 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
A Mystery Old Master

FAKE OR FORTUNE? A Mystery Old Master

 

Beyond the genteel galleries and upmarket auction houses of the art world lies a darker dimension: a world of incalculable wealth, social ambition and occasional subterfuge. Detective Philip Mould, journalist Fiona Bruce and a team of scientists investigate a new batch of potential fine art forgeries.

 

A Mystery Old Master
In this episode we are faced with a double mystery. A church in the heart of the Lancastrian countryside has been home to the work of a 16th century Italian Old Master for more than 200 years. The congregation has contacted them to help solve a riddle which has been puzzling everyone. Who painted this huge picture and just how did it find its way into a church once patronized by the famous Bronte sisters?

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Churchill and Munnings

FAKE OR FORTUNE?: Churchill and Munnings

 

Beyond the genteel galleries and upmarket auction houses of the art world lies a darker dimension: a world of incalculable wealth, social ambition and occasional subterfuge. Detective Philip Mould, journalist Fiona Bruce and a team of scientists investigate a new batch of potential fine art forgeries.

 

Churchill and Munnings
Charles Henty is the owner of two paintings which may be by two of the leading figures of the 20th century.

 

One was found in the coal hole of his family house in London and is possibly by Sir Winston Churchill. Painting was Churchill’s private passion. He received no formal training and painted purely for pleasure; but, even so, his works are now highly sought after by collectors.

 

The other painting, a landscape of Dedham in Essex, is possibly by Sir Alfred Munnings. While he may be an unfamiliar name to many outside the art world, during his lifetime, Munnings was the most successful highly valued British artist of all time. But Dedham was also home to another painter: the infamous forger Tom Keating.

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Renoir

 

Beyond the genteel galleries and upmarket auction houses of the art world lies a darker dimension: a world of incalculable wealth, social ambition and occasional subterfuge. Detective Philip Mould, journalist Fiona Bruce and a team of scientists investigate a new batch of potential fine art forgeries.

 

Renoir
Art detective Philip Mould and journalist Fiona Bruce try to prove a painting hanging in a Welsh Castle is by celebrated French Impressionist, Pierre Auguste Renoir. For 50 years the painting has been dogged by doubt and two powerful art world authorities can’t agree whether it’s genuine or fake. Philip travels to Berlin to see if cutting-edge technology can determine whether the pigments in the painting match up to those listed by Renoir himself.

 

1 2 3 4