TV

AMERICAN MASTERS
Jacques Pépin

 

Discover the story of Chef Jacques Pépin, a young immigrant with movie-star looks and a charming Gallic accent, who elevated essential kitchen techniques to an art form to become one of America’s most beloved food icons.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Cyber-Secure Are You?

 

INSIGHTS explores cyber-security in this modern age of data. Your new big screen smart TV looks innocent enough. But Wikileaks’ latest raft of documents alleged the CIA had created tools to turn smart TVs into bugging devices. Vizio and Netflix already admitted to tracking customer behavior through TV’s. Our smartphones and computers can be targeted by hackers. But you have more control over these intrusions and criminal acts than you might imagine.

 

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights





Mary Tyler Moore:
A Celebration

 

Mary Tyler Moore “turned the world on with her smile” on The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Mary Tyler Moore Show and on the silver screen. This special features classic clips plus comments from Betty White, Ed Asner, Valerie Harper, Cloris Leachman, Gavin MacLeod, John Amos, Carl Reiner, Dick Van Dyke, and Moore herself. Plus, Oprah Winfrey recounts Mary Tyler Moore’s critical role as TV’s first independent career woman.

 

AMERICAN MASTERS
Norman Lear

 

Discover how the prolific creator of “All in the Family,” “The Jeffersons” and “Good Times” effected social change through his groundbreaking sitcoms and activism. Featuring interviews with George Clooney, Amy Poehler, Jon Stewart, Russell Simmons and Lear himself.

 

Full of Memories and Full of Thanks

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS Hawai‘iAs you read this, the PBS Hawai‘i staff will have re-assembled across town in our new home for storytelling and community building, a beautiful work environment created and built by the support of our fellow Islanders.

 

It’s a cheerful place that promotes transparency – there are no cubicles, just open space with desk groupings and a lot of glass walls. It’s designed, by architect Sheryl Seaman of Group 70 International, for teamwork and collaboration.

 

One immediate favorite spot is nicknamed Team Space – it’s a long farm table where staffers can get together for lunch breaks or have work discussions, using a “writable” wall.

 

To get to this open environment, we had to pack up our longtime rented home on the campus of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. It was easy deciding which technology and office equipment to take. What “got” to us is the dilemma that faces almost everyone who moves: What do you do with stacks of memorabilia that are a nod to precious times and achievements?

 

First, our storehouses of past decades of programming, with people and places of a Hawaii gone by, held in outdated media formats: Chris Lee and Heather Giugni, co-founders of ‘Ulu‘ulu: The Henry Ku‘ualoha Giugni Archive, settled that for us by welcoming our material. They’ll do their magic to make programs accessible to online viewers and researchers.

 

Second, the trophies, accolades, and photographs from over 50 years of public television in Hawai‘i: We had a display cabinet of trophies and ceremonial gifts, and walls with framed acknowledgements. And there were plaques and certificates tucked away elsewhere – just too many congratulatory items, over the five decades, to showcase. We decided to create a pictorial and written record of all of them to take with us. A number were selected to be part of our new streamlined environment.

 

And so here we are, full of memories and full of thanks.

 

Our staff serves with the knowledge that we stand on the shoulders of excellent professionals and many caring, akamai citizens who’ve come before us. We intend to carry that same torch of education in this collaborative new space, upholding PBS Hawai‘i as a community connector that reaches into homes and hearts with authentic storytelling that touches, and even changes, lives.

 

As Board Chair Robbie Alm says, “I am very excited at all the opportunities the new building represents and I will also carry the spirit of our Dole Street (Manoa) building with me always.”

 

I mua! (Moving forward)
Leslie signature
Full of Memories and Full of Thanks

 

Here Goes! We’re in the Process of Moving

 

PBS Hawaii. Moving boxes.

Sticky notes and forms indicate which files will be going with us to our new location on Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road.

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiPBS Hawai‘i staffers have heard this four-word question many times: “Have you moved yet?”

 

It’s certainly pertinent, after more than a year of updates on our new building under construction across town and the latest fundraising numbers.

 

Until last month, the answer was: No, not yet.

 

Now, as you read this, the answer is: Here goes! We’re in the process of moving.

 

It isn’t happening in a day. The start of the exodus from the University of Hawai‘i Manoa campus was last month. The new technology being assembled is awesome, including a new undersea-overland fiber link to New York to access diverse national and international programming. But it’s people who make things happen. If all goes well, on May 2, our dedicated employees and students will find themselves in a beautiful new home for education and media-making at the corner of Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road.

 

We hope and plan to sustain uninterrupted broadcasting throughout the move. Our “flash-cut” to a new broadcast operating system is scheduled for the middle of this month. At this time, we’re getting up to speed with new technology, operating in what Chief Engineer John Nakahira calls a “shadow state” of parallel broadcasting.

 

As I understand it, our current landlord, the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, is turning over the space we occupy to the university’s Academy for Creative Media. We’re pleased that the academy will gain a gem of a TV/multimedia studio, large and well-designed. It survived a 2011 fire and is imbued with the memories of prominent people, dramas, and live music that often moved the soul.

 

At the Nimitz home, a new large studio awaits us, as well as two smaller studios. It is our fond and fervent hope that this new home will blossom with illuminating and interactive new local programming, raising the bar in a fine tradition of Hawai‘i storytelling.

 

The final live telecast from the PBS Hawai‘i Manoa studio takes place on Thursday, April 14  our weekly live, call-in public affairs show, Insights on PBS Hawai‘i. Next time you view Insights, on May 5, it’ll be coming to you from Nimitz Highway.

 

With our Board of Directors, led by Robbie Alm, I can’t speak of our new building without thinking of you and thanking you. The people of Hawai‘i Nei built this new home for education through multimedia storytelling.

 

You had faith in a locally owned, locally run nonprofit enterprise that uses technology and touch to serve our fellow citizens of all ages with rich programming.

 

Mahalo piha. Here goes!

Leslie signature

 

Countdown to Downton Abbey

 

Join Tony Award-winning host Kelli O’Hara to count down the moments till the final season begins, with cast and filmmaker interviews celebrating the global impact of the series. Tune in to find out what may lie in store for the beloved characters.

 

I’LL HAVE WHAT PHIL’S HAVING
Los Angeles

 

Journey with Phil Rosenthal, creator of the TV series Everybody Loves Raymond , as he learns from chefs, vendors, culinary leaders and style-setters. Rosenthal visits the kitchens on and off the well-worn gastronomic path that keep traditions alive and create new ones.

 

Los Angeles
Tag along as Phil invites his LA friends, like Martin Short and Allison Janney, to his favorite spots around the city, including LA’s oldest farmers’ market. A taco truck crawl and visits to bakeries complete the tour.

 

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