system

Most Likely to Succeed

 

Most Likely to Succeed examines how the current American educational system was established in 1893 – a system that’s remained a standard in schools, while the economy has made dramatic shifts due to technology. The film highlights High Tech High School, a San Diego charter school that uses hands-on, project-based curricula, and serves as a model for what’s possible, as communities across the country attempt to re-imagine education for now and the future.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Race Underground

 

Learn how America’s first subway, in Boston, overcame a litany of engineering challenges, the greed-driven interests of businessmen and the great fears of its citizenry to create a rapid transit system soon replicated throughout the country.

 

NOVA
Super Tunnel

 

Follow an army of engineers and designers as they tackle the complex challenge of building Crossrail, a massive new subterranean railway deep beneath the streets of London.

 

NOVA
School of the Future

 

In a new age of information, rapid innovation and globalization, how can we prepare our children to compete? Discover how the new science of learning can help us re-imagine the future of education for all children. In a series of compelling personal profiles of students and teachers, the film looks at the consequences of widespread inequities that often create gaps in opportunities and educational achievement, and explores innovative attempts to narrow those gaps. NOVA visits neuroscientists, psychologists and educators with new insights revealing how kids’ brains work – including how stress, sleep, mindset and emotions affect learning; what role technology should play in the classroom; and which techniques are most likely to engage and inspire growing minds.

 

Restoring Best Picture Quality

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture QualityWe’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiThe people of Hawai‘i bought us a $30 million new home. You provided us a forward-looking physical plant and the stability of property ownership.

 

And, of course, you now expect us to “bring it” with more and more quality content and higher and higher production values. That’s our expectation, too!

 

The last thing you want to see is reduced picture quality on shows that you love.

 

Understood. And yet, you may have experienced intermittent pixelation (that’s when individual pixels in a digitized image stand out) and sporadic, brief audio disruptions, all since PBS Hawai‘i moved into our new home with major, new technology systems.

 

First, I want to apologize to you for the blemishes in your viewing experience. Second, I’d like to explain. Third, I want you to know we have been working constantly, and repeatedly seeking help from network specialists, to eliminate the problems. And fourth, we have reason to believe that a solution is imminent.

 

As I write this, Level 3 Communications is arranging for a larger dedicated fiber circuit to transport our content. Level 3’s service to this local public television station repeatedly fell through the cracks following the telecom giant’s $5.7 billion acquisition of our previous provider, TW Telecom. We experienced critical delays as Level 3 worked to integrate TW Telecom into its fold and laid off staff. Level 3’s challenges in absorbing TW persisted as PBS Hawai‘i relocated to our new building and launched a long-planned transformation of our engineering model.

 

Our new model is something we’re excited about, because it allows us to spend less money to distribute our programming on today’s multiple media platforms – and frees up more resources for quality content. Our new systems rely upon dedicated access to an undersea, overland fiber optic network that runs through a Joint Master Control Center, called Centralcast, in Syracuse, New York. We’re creating programming expressly for Hawai‘i while sharing “back-office” tech costs with our PBS nonprofit peers.

 

Using this data highway shouldn’t have presented roadblocks in the Age of Fiber, but timing is everything: Our contracted fiber provider, TW Telecom, found itself going through a wrenching ownership transition. We sense that the layoffs may have resulted in a loss of institutional knowledge about projects already underway. For three months since our move to our new building, we experienced new owner Level 3’s lack of communication and responsiveness while our picture and audio quality suffered.

 

“This wasn’t managed properly. I don’t know why – we know how to do this. We’ll take care of it,” Level 3’s new Hawai‘i sales director Anthony Compiseno assured us when we met for the first time on August 8. He told us that we’d been assigned an unsuitable network setting – and arranged to test higher bandwidth capability (300mb or megabits per second, versus 200mb on our existing pipe), with a “pseudowire” enhancement to protect our broadcasting content. By the time you read this, our picture quality may already have returned.

 

You and other viewers have gone through this trying time of intermittent broadcast disruptions with us.

 

PBS Hawai‘i sends you our gratitude and aloha, for your patience and your continued faith in our programming.

 

We’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture Quality

 

GENIUS BY STEPHEN HAWKING
Where Are We?

GENIUS BY STEPHEN HAWKING: Where Are We?

 

Renowned scientist Stephen Hawking presents three everyday people with a series of physical and mental challenges that show them how to think like a genius. Through large-scale experiments and demonstrations, Hawking decodes the mysteries of evolutionary biology, astrophysics and quantum mechanics, breaking down scienti­fic concepts in ways that are more easily accessible. The program “furthers my lifelong aim to bring science to the public,” said Hawking.

 

Where Are We?
The team is challenged with measuring the earth, the solar system and the universe to fi­nd humanity’s true place in the cosmos.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Who’s Homeschooling and Why?

 

Nearly 6,000 children are being homeschooled in Hawai‘i. INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I takes a look at parents’ different reasons for not sending their children through the school system. Guests will also discuss the pros and cons of homeschooling.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Uncovering South Korea

JOSEPH ROSENDO'S TRAVELSCOPE: Uncovering South Korea

 

On Joseph’s first visit to Korea, he discovers that while the capital city of Seoul’s modern skyline and prosperity are impressive, it’s Korea’s extraordinary history, traditions and customs that are the cornerstones of its culture.

 

THE BRAIN WITH DAVID EAGLEMAN
How Do I Decide?

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling personal stories.

 

How Do I Decide?
Learn how the brain navigates the tens of thousands of conscious decisions we make every day and the many more unconscious decisions we make about everything from whom we find attractive to what we perceive.

 

The Brain with David Eagleman
Who is in Control?

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling personal stories.

 

Who is in Control?
Dr. Eagleman explores the unconscious brain and reveals that everything from our movements, to our decisions, to our behavior is largely controlled and orchestrated by an invisible world of unconscious neural activity.

 

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