support

A Threat to Public Broadcasting’s “Spark”

Protect My Public Media

If you’d like to help support public media organizations like PBS Hawai‘i:

  1. Contact your Hawai‘i Congressional delegates.
  2. Go to ProtectMyPublicMedia.org and sign a petition.
  3. Continue to pitch in with your private dollars as you can.

Thank you


Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiAt first, when Ronald Reagan launched his Presidency in 1981, he didn’t like the idea of federal monies going to fund PBS and NPR stations across the country.

 

Then he saw how public-service media stations leveraged a relatively small amount of federal funding to gain private donations. One federal dollar might turn into, say, eight dollars, with citizens, businesses and charitable foundations adding the weight of their support.

 

“Government should provide the spark and the private sector should do the rest,” President Reagan said.

 

We at PBS Hawai‘i believe this is a good public-private partnership, centered on education, public safety and civic leadership. Last year, 9.5 percent of our revenues came from the federal investment.

 

Now comes the Trump Administration, signaling its intention to “privatize” – meaning de-fund – the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the private nonprofit that distributes funds to public media stations. Other Administration targets are the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

As I write this, two weeks before publication, I’m getting ready to go to Washington, D.C. for a national public media summit, at which attendees will seek to determine President Trump’s plans. Is he really going to wage a battle against federal seed money for public broadcasting?

 

The public broadcasting community says the notion of eliminating the federal funding in its mission is “nothing new.” It points out that similar ideas have been “soundly rejected on a bipartisan basis.”

 

According to the industry publication Current, the chair of a key House Appropriations subcommittee, Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), predicts that such a move would fail because “there is a strong constituency for public broadcasting in both the House and Senate.”

 

Indeed, strong bipartisan support usually results in an appropriation of about $1.35 per year per American. Still, leaders of public broadcasting say they must take funding threats seriously. They’re asking to talk with Administration officials, and station general managers from all over the country are taking their case to Capitol Hill.

 

PBS Hawai‘i’s Board of Directors already has written to Hawai‘i’s Congressional delegates.

 

However, America’s Public Television Stations (APTS) isn’t calling out and mobilizing citizens at this time. Without a fleshed-out proposal from the Trump Administration, leaders are monitoring the situation closely. We are urging viewers to register your support at protectmypublicmedia.org.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

On March 8, Whole Foods Market will donate 5% of Hawai‘i net sales to PBS Hawai‘i

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo are among those from the 90 public, private and charter schools across the Islands in HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i’s flagship digital learning initiative, which will benefit from Whole Foods Market’s Community Giving Day.HONOLULU – Whole Foods Market Hawai‘i has selected PBS Hawai‘i as its statewide nonprofit partner for its upcoming Community Giving Day on Wednesday, March 8.

 

Pictured: Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo are among those from the 90 public, private and charter schools across the Islands in HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i’s flagship digital learning initiative, which will benefit from Whole Foods Market’s Community Giving Day.

 

That day, five percent of net sales from all three Whole Foods Market locations in Hawai‘i – Kahala and Kailua on O‘ahu, and Kahului on Maui – will go toward supporting PBS Hawai‘i’s mission of advancing learning and discovery through its video programming.

 

Whole Foods Market hosts Community Giving Days twice a year to benefit local nonprofits. These initiatives are part of the company’s core values and commitment to serving and supporting local and global communities.

 

“We are thrilled to partner with PBS Hawai‘i, as we have a shared interest in providing the highest quality products,” says Annalee England, Whole Foods Market Kahului Store Team Leader. “Whole Foods Market does so through our selection of the best natural, organic and locally sourced foods, and PBS Hawai‘i through their incomparable programming for the whole family.”

 

PBS Hawai‘i’s statewide digital learning initiative, HIKI NŌ, will benefit from the Community Giving Day. Through this program, PBS Hawai‘i offers free digital storytelling training for the program’s 90 participating public, private and charter schools across the Islands. The student video stories that result from this training are showcased online at pbshawaii.org, and on Thursday nights at 7:30 on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Since its launch in 2011, HIKI NŌ has served more than 4,800 students. More than half of HIKI NŌ schools are Title I, the federal designation of schools with at least 40 percent of students coming from low-income families.

 

“With HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i is bridging serious educational and socioeconomic gaps,” says Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO. “This partnership with Whole Foods Market will help us with this important work in our island communities – some as near as those in PBS Hawai‘i’s own neighborhood of Kalihi, and as far and remote as South Point on Hawai‘i Island.”

 

Other programs produced locally by PBS Hawai‘i include the live, weekly community affairs program Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, the half-hour interview program Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox and the Hawaiian music series Na Mele.

 

As the Islands’ only member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service, PBS Hawai‘i carries flagship PBS programs, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Independent Lens, NOVA, Frontline and educational children’s programming on PBS KIDS.

 

PBS Hawai‘i is also one of a handful of PBS stations in the country to carry a live feed of English-language international news coverage from Japanese public broadcaster NHK World.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

FRONTLINE
Trump’s Road to the White House

 

An investigation of how Donald Trump defied expectations to win the presidency. Through interviews with key players, the film shows how Trump rallied millions of supporters, defeated adversaries, and whom he’s bringing into the White House with him.

 

#GivingTuesday Kicks Off Season of Giving

 

November 29 is #GivingTuesday, a global movement dedicated to giving back.

 

When you think of the organizations that contribute to your life, we hope PBS Hawai‘i is among those that are top of mind.

 

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We work to acquire and create thoughtful, positive programs that transport you to other times and places, immerse you in culture and arts, and provide calm, discerning coverage of public affairs.

 

But, as always, we can’t do it without the generous support from those who enjoy PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Please join us in this exciting global tradition of generosity.

 

Donate to PBS Hawai‘i

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November 29 is #GivingTuesday

PBS Hawaii

 

Giving TuesdayHONOLULU, HI – In celebration of #GivingTuesday, observed the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, PBS Hawai‘i will be encouraging the community to support Hawai‘i’s only locally owned public television station through our first #GivingTuesday social media campaign. This year, #GivingTuesday falls on Tuesday, Nov. 29.

 

Throughout that day, PBS Hawai‘i will be rolling out a series of videos on Facebook Live that aim to remind the community how the public television station plays a role in so many individuals’ lives. PBS Hawai‘i will also be keeping the day fun through lighthearted memes, improvised skits and other creative means through social media.

 

#GivingTuesday is a global giving movement that has been driven by individuals, families, organizations, businesses and communities in all 50 states and in countries around the world. Since its founding in 2012, millions of people have come together to support and champion the causes they believe in and the communities in which they live.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

Contact: Liberty Peralta

Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org

Phone: 808.462.5030

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Save and Share:

 


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From The Streets to the Stage: The Journey of Fredrick Davis

 

Follow ballet dancer Frederick Davis’ personal journey, which began with a broken family and homelessness. His exposure to dance at age 11 changed his life – he found inspiration and support from Ballet Tennessee, his church family and a caring community.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
LBJ: Part One

 

Revisit the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson who used his mastery of the legislative process to shepherd a collection of progressive programs. An accidental president, LBJ set out to make his mark by pushing through historic social legislation of a scale that rivaled FDR’s New Deal. But Johnson’s vision was shattered by the increasing debacle of Vietnam, and his presidency began to unravel.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
LBJ: Part Two

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE – LBJ: Part Two

 

Revisit the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson who used his mastery of the legislative process to shepherd a collection of progressive programs. An accidental president, LBJ set out to make his mark by pushing through historic social legislation of a scale that rivaled FDR’s New Deal. But Johnson’s vision was shattered by the increasing debacle of Vietnam, and his presidency began to unravel.

 

PBS Hawaii | Passport Frequently Asked Questions

PBS Hawaii Passport, your new member benefit

 

  1. What is PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is a new benefit which provides PBS Hawai‘i supporters extended on-demand access to a rich library of quality public television programming. This is one of the many benefits that PBS Hawai‘i provides its donors.

 

  1. Why is PBS Hawai‘i making this service available?

As more and more people are watching television content on-demand on digital devices, PBS Hawai‘i Passport gives PBS Hawai‘i donors a way to enjoy extended access to PBS and PBS Hawai‘i content on platforms including computers, smartphones and tablets.

 

  1. What kind of content can people find on PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

At launch, PBS Hawai‘i Passport will include several hundred hours of programming, representing many genres, including drama, science, history, natural history and the arts. Notable titles include MASTERPIECE series such as “Downton Abbey” and “Wolf Hall,” along with other favorites such as VICIOUS, EARTH A NEW WILD, HOW WE GOT TO NOW, THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW and many more. PBS Hawai‘i Passport will also include popular PBS Hawai‘i programs such as Na Mele archives. The PBS Hawai‘i Passport library will continue to grow as more series and episodes are added.

 

  1. How can viewers find content that’s available on PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

Donors who wish to take advantage of PBS Hawai‘i Passport, must activate their account for access. They will be asked to register to confirm their identity and membership status, and then they can start enjoying PBS Hawai‘i Passport.

PBS Hawai‘i Passport can be accessed on the PBS Hawai‘i website, as well as on PBS.org, the PBS Video apps for Android and iOS smartphones and tablets, and the PBS app on AppleTV when PBS Hawai‘i has been identified as your local station. To get started, look for videos with the compass icon. Those videos are only available to users who are registered for PBS Hawai‘i Passport.

 

  1. Who qualifies for PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is the newest benefit available from PBS Hawai‘i for donors with a yearly contribution of at least $60 or an ongoing monthly contribution of $5 or more. It cannot be purchased separately.

 

  1. Is PBS Hawai‘i Passport a service or subscription that people can purchase?

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is an added benefit of station support. It cannot be purchased separately and is not a subscription service.

 

  1. Does PBS Hawai‘i Passport mean there will be no more free streaming on PBS.org or on PBS Hawai‘i website?

No. PBS and PBS Hawai‘i content will continue to be available for free on pbs.org, pbshawaii.org and other digital platforms. PBS Hawai‘i Passport provides extended access to a rich library of content for PBS Hawai‘i supporters to enjoy.

Certain content, including news and public affairs programs such as FRONTLINE, PBS NEWSHOUR, INDEPENDENT LENS and POV, will always be accessible to everyone.

 

  1. Doesn’t having a subset of content only for donors go against what PBS and PBS Hawai‘i stands for?

PBS is committed to providing free streaming of local and national content across multiple platforms after a program airs. PBS Hawai‘i Passport goes one step further by offering an extended access to a rich library of content for station donors.

Certain content, including news and public affairs programs such as FRONTLINE, PBS NEWSHOUR, INDEPENDENT LENS and POV, will always be accessible to everyone.

 

  1. I’m not seeing my favorite PBS show in PBS Hawai‘i Passport. Why not?

Initially, several hundred hours of content will be available via PBS Hawai‘i Passport This library of content will continue grow over time as more titles are added.

 

  1. Will PBS KIDS content be available via PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

There are no plans to include PBS KIDS programming in PBS Hawai‘i Passport at this time.

 

Raising the Bar – The Best Way to Express Our Gratitude

Viewer thank you note

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiMy job is essentially to be a problem-solver. There’s certainly enough to reach for, as the fragmented worlds of media and education require more focus, more engagement, more depth, more context. And in this rapidly changing world, answers are a moving target.

 

But that’s not the toughest part of my job. As in other things in life, the simplest things can be the most difficult. And quite simply, it is very difficult to adequately express thanks.

 

Our unpaid Board of Directors and lean staff could spend most of the day writing thank-you letters or making calls – and it simply wouldn’t be enough to express the gratitude we feel here for what citizens are supporting.

 

After we lost our lease at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the people of Hawai‘i and several mainland-based charitable foundations with ties to Hawaii gave us more than $30 million to establish a modern stand-alone multimedia center on Nimitz Highway at the entrance to Sand Island, PBS Hawai‘i’s Clarence T.C. Ching Campus. This nonprofit now owns an acre of land and a two-story building, which (thankfully) came in on time and on budget.

 

And still, after building us a new house, some viewers thank us. Here’s an example, from a woman who wrote by hand: “I hope you don’t get tired of my thank-you notes but I gotta say how much it means to me to watch [PBS Hawai‘i].” Here’s another hand-written note: “PBS Hawai‘i is contributing to society. I want PBS to continue this way. That’s why I make my donation.”

 

See what I mean? With a heart full of gratitude, I want you to know that we are dedicated to making the most out of your gift of a new building and your support of programming. We want to raise the bar on our stories and in quality in all areas, including our events for adults and keiki. We want to “be there” for our state – all of it, not just metropolitan Oahu. We want to be trusted for fairness and accuracy. And when we make mistakes, we want to own up and do better. Maybe that’s the best way to convey our thanks.

 

Also, we’re offering all the thousands of building donors a guided tour of the television station. Next month, after we complete technical troubleshooting, install a photovoltaic energy system and add donor signage, we’ll have an opening ceremony. But because of space concerns, we can’t invite all who made the building possible. So we invite NEW HOME donors to arrange a personal tour, now or later, by calling Christina Sumida at (808) 462-5045. Quite simply, we’d like to thank you in person.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

 

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