skills

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Bad Kids

 

Located in an impoverished Mojave Desert community, Black Rock Continuation High School is an alternative school for students at risk of dropping out; Black Rock is their last chance. Extraordinary educators believe that empathy and life skills, more than academics, give these underserved students command of their own futures.

 

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY
The Woodworker

 

Host Eric Gorges combs the country for America’s finest craftsmen, documenting what it means to be a modern-day maker. In each episode, Eric explains the history of an old-world craft as it is practiced in America today.

 

The Woodworker
Host Eric Gorges visits John Wilson, a writer, a teacher and a woodworker, at his home shop and learns how to make a shoulder plane. Eric learns the history of shop-made tools, how to home temper tool-steel and the importance of salt in the woodshed.

 

Strategy from a Swordfighter

Musashi Miyamoto, right, as depicted by artist Yoshitaki Tsunejiro

 

Musashi Minamoto, right, as depicted by artist Yoshitake Tsunejiro.

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiOne of the greatest swordfighters in history comes to mind as PBS Hawai‘i sets out to draft a new strategic plan to guide us in a rapidly changing media environment.

 

“Do nothing which is of no use,” wrote samurai Musashi Miyamoto, when he wasn’t roaming Japan wielding two swords, facing enemies in the Edo period.

 

Yes, Miyamoto-San, we must decide what skills and habits of mind we need to take with us into the future, in order to serve up great content on the many viewing screens in people’s lives. Folks might want to lean back for an hour-long documentary on a big wall monitor; catch a one-minute clip on their smartphone; or participate in a globally interactive discussion on their tablet. In fact, it’s already become common for people to use two digital devices at the same time to access content.

 

“Perception is strong and sight weak. In strategy, it is important to see distant things as if they were close and to take a distanced view of close things.” So true, Minamoto-San, as we clear the bias of the present moment and attempt to see with clarity how we and fellow Islanders will want to use media and storytelling in the years ahead. Our organization used to peer ahead five years; now, even trying to pin down the next three years in this industry seems foolhardy.

 

In meetings held so far, our Board of Directors, Staff and stakeholders agree that PBS Hawai‘i must create a far-reaching system of touch points for people to encounter our programming. We’ll go where people are, rather than wait for them on a television monitor. We’ll continue to broadcast. However, many more people will want to engage in content online, selecting what they want to see when they want to see it. We want that, too.

 

First and foremost, we’re storytellers. We can and will adapt, to meet the need for quality stories and interactivity in different ways on different digital devices.

 

“Fixation is the way to death. Fluidity is the way to life,” wrote Miyamoto, who was known for anticipating an opponent’s moves and unleashing unexpected moves to bring victory.

 

However, the future isn’t all about fluidity and change. Like many of our viewers, we intend to hold onto our mindsets of curiosity, discovery, resilience, fairness; our belief in exposure to diverse viewpoints and civil discourse; and the value of universal access to education and reliable information.

 

When our Board of Directors adopts a new strategic plan at mid-year, we’ll share the plan with you and count on your feedback as we evolve. As Miyamoto-San said, “It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first.”

 

At least we don’t run the risk of sword injuries! We do stand a fighting chance of creating richer and more versatile viewing experiences for you.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

Life Lessons from Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood – for Adults, Too!

Life Lessons from Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood – for Adults, Too!

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiDaniel Tiger looks more like a stuffed animal than a sage. But he’s as wise as he is fuzzy.

 

In the animated TV show, Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood – built upon Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood – Daniel Tiger shares simple life lessons that help toddlers deal with very real issues, such as disappointment, anger and jealousy.

 

Their parents say the shows provide counsel and reinforcement for them, too.

 

“I wish I could have had a show like that when I was young,” a father told me. “My favorite was the episode about being bullied.”

 

I heard that sentiment again and again at PBS Hawai‘i’s recent Keiki Club parties, as Daniel Tiger mingled with the excited toddler set.

 

“I admit it. I watch the show with my sons,” a mom told me. “And I find myself taking Daniel’s advice. It’s easy to remember, with those little songs that he and his friends sing.”

 

Oh, I know. I recall a heated discussion in the office. It ended with laughter, when a staffer chanted: “When you feel so mad, that you want to roar, take a deep breath, and count to four. 1, 2, 3, 4.”

 

The staffer was channeling Daniel Tiger, of course. The show shares social-emotional skills for preschoolers.

 

Feeling left out, sadness, frustration – these emotions can intrude at any time in life. Daniel Tiger faces these challenges and more with a knowing and positive spirit. He understands that sometimes kids don’t feel like brushing their teeth; potty-training can be awfully tricky; and it can be hard to say you’re sorry.

 

I asked a four-year-old what she learned from her buddy Daniel.

 

“Everyone is big enough to do something,” she answered proudly. “I’m big enough to clean up my toys by myself.”

 

Her mother commented, “I actually found myself thinking about Daniel Tiger during all this negative election stuff. We need to be more kind.”

 

As her child made a new friend in the Keiki Club, her mother added: “I told her that she needs to learn her manners; she wouldn’t want to turn out to be rude and mean, like some of the adults we see on the TV news.”

 

Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood airs daily at 9:00 and 9:30 am on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

 

Punahou glassblowing educator featured in national PBS arts series

PBS Hawaii

 

“CRAFT IN AMERICA: TEACHERS” PREMIERES SEPTEMBER 17 AT 8:00 PM ON PBS HAWAI‘I

 

HONOLULU, HI – A Punahou School educator is being highlighted on the season eight premiere of the Peabody Award-winning PBS series, “Craft in America.”Mark Mitsuda assists a student in the glassblowing studio at Punahou School. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Markley

 

Craft in America: TEACHERS premieres locally on PBS Hawai‘i on Saturday, September 17 at 8:00 pm.

 

Mark Mitsuda assists a student in the glassblowing studio at Punahou School. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Markley

 

The hour-long episode is a celebration of teachers – extraordinary individuals who are committed to their own artistic visions and are equally committed to sharing their skills and passion for craft with new generations of students and artists of all ages. Punahou glassblowing teacher Mark Mitsuda is among the artists and teachers from across the nation who are featured.

 

Mitsuda has been teaching the art of glassblowing at Punahou School since 1998, when his mentor, Hugh Jenkins, retired. Jenkins founded the glassblowing program at Punahou in 1972, using recycled milk and mayonnaise bottles as raw materials.

 

Mark Mitsuda has been teaching glassblowing at Punahou School since 1998. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Markley

 

Mark Mitsuda has been teaching glassblowing at Punahou School since 1998. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Markley

 

Underscoring the inter-generational mission of teaching, Mitsuda says that what he learned from Jenkins, he now passes on to his own students. “I feel fortunate to be teaching something that I feel passionate about and being able to inspire other people in the place that inspired me to first go into glassblowing,” he said.

 

After attending college in New York, Washington State and the University of Hawai‘i, Mitsuda co-founded Glass Design Group with two of his college classmates. His work is in numerous private collections, as well as the Hawai‘i State Foundation for Culture and the Arts.

 

This episode of “Craft in America” is a part of PBS’ Spotlight Education, a week of primetime programming that features reports from today’s classrooms.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.462.5030

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

NOVA
Mystery of Easter Island

 

A remote, bleak speck of rock in the Pacific, Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, has mystified the world ever since the first Europeans arrived in 1722. How and why did the ancient islanders build and move nearly 900 giant statues, or moai, weighing as much as 86 tons each? And how did they transform a presumed paradise into a treeless wasteland, bringing ruin upon their island and themselves? NOVA explores controversial recent claims that challenge decades of previous thinking about the islanders, who have been accused of everything from ecocide to cannibalism. Among the radical new theories is that the islanders used ropes to “walk” the statues upright, like moving a fridge. With the help of an accurate 15-ton replica statue, a NOVA team sets out to test this high-risk, seemingly unlikely theory – serving up plenty of action and surprises in this fresh investigation of one of the ancient world’s most intriguing enigmas.

 

NOVA
Inside Animal Minds: Bird Genius

NOVA Inside Animal Minds: Bird Genius

 

Today, researchers are discovering that some creatures have mastered skills purportedly restricted to humans. Many are bird brains. Meet a cockatoo with a talent for picking locks; a wild crow on a mission to solve an eight-step puzzle; and a tame raven who can solve a puzzle box so quickly that his performance has to be captured with high-speed photography. Are these skills really evidence of high intelligence or just parlor tricks, the result of training and instinct?‌ To find out, NOVA tests the limits of some of the planet’s brainiest animals, searching for the secrets of a problem-solving mind.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by James Campbell High School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by James Campbell High School in Ewa Beach in West Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu introduces us to P.E. for the 21st century. When students take physical education at this high-tech middle school on the Ewa plain, they don’t just play dodge ball or run laps around the track. We learn how their innovative P.E. program is using computer technology to help students get fit both physically and digitally.

 

Also Featured:
Maui High School on the Valley Island explores the challenges of designing schools to provide a healthy learning environment while keeping out intruders. Architect Charles Kaneshiro, president of Group 70 International based in Honolulu, shows the design elements he incorporated at Puʻu Kukui Elementary School in Wailuku, Maui, to provide “zones of supervision” throughout the multi-building campus.

 

On Hawaii Island, Hawaii Preparatory Academy students Mason Dupont and Jacob McCafferty researched, designed and created a remote-controlled boat that can be used to study marine life such as whales. The boat wasn’t created for a traditional class in engineering or science, but for a self-directed, independent study project.

 

Kapaa High School on Kauai tells us about a new program created by the Kauai Humane Society to encourage the adoption of dogs. Volunteers take dogs from the Kauai Humane Society on field trips to various places on the island to help them meet potential owners.

 

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama on Oahu takes us into a classroom that takes 21st century skills to a new level as students learn the intricacies of cell division, land ecology and geographical mapping through the popular video game, Minecraft. Students experience hands-on interaction with the land, exploration of their Hawaiian culture, and, of course, video gaming! The results: collaboration that combines creativity, communication, critical thinking – and a little bit of chaos.

 

Students of Kapaa Middle School on Kauai show us what makes their May Day program different from others in the state, and reveal what it takes to prepare for this beloved Hawaii tradition.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 4 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, July 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

Peg + Cat

 

Peg + Cat is an animated math-based series for children ages 3-5 years old. The show follows the adorable, spirited Peg and her sidekick Cat as they embark on adventures, solve problems together, and learn foundational math concepts and skills.  In each 12 minute episode, Peg and Cat face A REALLY BIG PROBLEM, a messy funny crisis they must somehow solve without totally freaking out!

 

Along the way, they grapple with all kinds of loony, loopy obstacles, under intense time pressure.  They write out diagrams and charts on the graph paper that comprises their background.  They interact with one another in their own quirky, comical way.  And somehow, they always find a way to solve the math and save the day.

 

Peg + Cat will inspire preschoolers’ natural curiosity about math and help them develop new skills and strategies for solving problems creatively in their daily lives.  Through engaging characters, whimsical stories, and songs, the show will celebrate the ways in which math plays a role in their world.

 

By using characters kids relate to and laugh with, and situations they’re thrilled and entertained by, PEG + CAT makes math problems cool.