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THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards
Part Two

THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards: Part Two

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ features highlights from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards live-streamed announcements of the winners.

 

On Saturday, March 11th, the results of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards were announced by PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā in a four-island, closed-circuit, live-stream awards show originating from the PBS Hawai‘i studio on O‘ahu. HIKI NŌ teachers and students from the nominated schools gathered at their respective locations to watch the announcements: Paliku Theatre at Windward Community College on O‘ahu; McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center on Maui; the Kaua‘i Marriott Resort on Kaua‘i; Honua Studios in Kona; and the Waiakea High School library in Hilo. Each time an award was announced, the teacher and students from the winning school came onstage to accept their award from a PBS Hawai‘i Board member: a bronze medal for third place, silver for second place and gold for first. Gold medalists also won a $1,000 gift card to purchase equipment for their school’s media program.

 

This episode picks up where we left off in last week’s show by featuring the medal-winning schools (and their projects) for Best Franchise Piece, Best Factoid, Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing, Best Overall Story Middle School Division, and Best Overall Story High School Division.

 

This program encores Saturday, April 1 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, April 2 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards
Part One

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ features highlights from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards live-streamed announcements of the winners.

 

On Saturday, March 11th, the results of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards were announced by PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā in a four-island, closed-circuit, live-stream awards show originating from the PBS Hawai‘i studio on O‘ahu. HIKI NŌ teachers and students from the nominated schools gathered at their respective locations to watch the announcements: Paliku Theatre at Windward Community College on O‘ahu; McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center on Maui; the Kaua‘i Marriott Resort on Kaua‘i; Honua Studios in Kona; and the Waiakea High School library in Hilo. Each time an award was announced, the teacher and students from the winning school came onstage to accept their award from a PBS Hawai‘i Board member: a bronze medal for third place, silver for second place and gold for first. Gold medalists also won a $1,000 gift card to purchase equipment for their school’s media program.

 

This episode features the medal-winning schools (and their stories) for Best Personal Profile Middle School Division, Best Personal Profile High School Division, Best Writing Middle School Division and Best Writing High School Division.

 

The remainder of the awards will be covered in next week’s show: The 2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS, Part 2.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 25 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, March 26 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


Arnold Knows Me:
The Tommy Kono Story

 

The late Tommy Kono inspired generations of body builders, including one of the world’s biggest movie stars. This film tells the inspirational story of the most decorated American in the history of weightlifting. A Sacramento, CA native, Tommy won two Olympic gold medals, an Olympic silver medal, and six World Championship titles between 1952 and 1960.

 

NOVA
Treasures of the Earth: Metals

 

Gold, bronze, iron, steel: these metals are pillars of our civilization, but what makes them so special? Discover their unique properties and explore how our mastery of metals has led us from the stone age to today’s hi-tech world.

 

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY
The Goldsmith

 

Host Eric Gorges visits a goldsmith in the mountains. Susan McDonough works in a small studio on her family’s farm. Eric makes a silver ring using a technique over 3000 years old. The conversation turns to the paths that craftpeople take in their journey. It’s neither straight nor connected. Some people take years to end up doing what they want. Along the way skills in Kitchens, Bakeries, School Bus Driving, EMT, Firefighter and Librarians are not unique. Susan just happened to hit all of those careers in her journey.

 

Olympic Quest: Teshya and Clarissa

Olympic Quest: Teshya Alo and Clarissa Chun

 

This special presentation celebrates two Olympic hopefuls from Hawaii: Teshya Alo and Clarissa Chun. They are competing in the U.S. Olympic Wrestling Trials on April 9-10 in Iowa City.

 

The film Winning Girl follows the four-year journey of Hawaii teenager Teshya Alo, whose sights are set on taking the gold at international judo and wrestling championships. Throughout, she also faces the challenges of growing up.

 

Then, Clarissa Chun talks to Leslie Wilcox about her experiences in what she calls a “fun but gruesome” sport. Long before winning an Olympic bronze medal in wrestling, Clarissa started competing in judo at age 7. By the time she took up wrestling at Roosevelt High School, Clarissa was unfazed about grappling with both boys and girls.