rights

DEAD RECKONING: WAR & JUSTICE
The General’s Ghost

 

Civilians worldwide are increasingly the targets of war crimes. This series examines the evolution of postwar justice through investigations of genocide, ethnic cleansing and other atrocities, and the prosecution of the perpetrators.

 

The General’s Ghost
See how laws and mechanisms for international justice are created in the wake of war crimes committed by Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. General Yamashita’s conviction for crimes against civilians establishes a command responsibility doctrine.

 

DEAD RECKONING: WAR & JUSTICE
The Blind Eye

DEAD RECKONING: WAR & JUSTICE: The Blind Eye

 

Civilians worldwide are increasingly the targets of war crimes. This series examines the evolution of postwar justice through investigations of genocide, ethnic cleansing and other atrocities, and the prosecution of the perpetrators.

 

The Blind Eye
Learn how the Cold War obstructs postwar justice and how atrocities in conflicts with large civilian tolls – such as Vietnam, Afghanistan and Guatemala – are concealed. Individuals make efforts to expose war crimes and identify the perpetrators.

 

DEAD RECKONING: WAR & JUSTICE
In Our Time

 

Civilians worldwide are increasingly the targets of war crimes. This series examines the evolution of postwar justice through investigations of genocide, ethnic cleansing and other atrocities, and the prosecution of the perpetrators.

 

In Our Time
See how postwar justice has been revitalized over the past two decades, but is limited in confronting the exponential rise in civilian tolls – sexual violence and genocide-occurring in the Balkans, Rwanda, Congo, Syria, Sri Lanka and other countries.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Happens to Hawai‘i Elders Who Don’t Have a Personal Safety Net?

 

Whether it’s job loss, illness, divorce or other life circumstances, some islanders find themselves at wit’s end, running out of money in retirement. What options do they have? And how are Hawai‘i taxpayers affected? What happens to Hawai‘i elders who don’t have a personal safety net?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

The Education of Harvey Gantt

 

In 1960, a talented African-American student from Charleston, Harvey Gantt, graduated from high school and decided to become an architect. Clemson College was the only school in South Carolina that offered a degree in his chosen field. In January of 1963, with the help of NAACP lawyer Matthew J. Perry, Gantt won a lawsuit against Clemson and was peacefully admitted to the college, making him the first African-American student to attend a formerly all-white school in South Carolina.

 

John Lewis
Get in the Way

 

Follow the journey of civil rights hero and human rights champion, U.S. Congressman John Lewis. At the Selma March, Lewis came face-to-face with club-wielding troopers and exemplified non-violence.

 

UH law professor to appear on PBS show ‘Open Mind’

PBS Hawaii

 

Carole PetersonHONOLULU, HI – The national public television show “The Open Mind” will feature a conversation with Carole Petersen, a Professor of Law at the UH William S. Richardson School of Law, and Director of the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution. The episode is scheduled to air Sunday at 6:00 pm on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

On the program, Petersen discusses the state of civil liberties in Hong Kong, where Petersen taught law for 17 years. She predicts that a small independence movement in Hong Kong will give Beijing incentive to further crack down on the territory.

 

Petersen has been researching challenges to civil liberties in Hong Kong since 1997, when it ceased to be a British colony and became a “Special Administrative Region” of China. In her 2006 co-authored book, Academic Freedom in Hong Kong, Petersen argued that the “One Country Two Systems” model had been largely successful in protecting academic freedom and civil liberties in Hong Kong. However, her latest research documents a dramatic decline in academic freedom in the past decade.

 

“The Open Mind,” hosted by Alexander Heffner, is a one-on-one conversational show that explores the world of ideas across politics, media, technology, the arts, news and public affairs. Designed to elicit insights into contemporary areas of national concern, “The Open Mind” explores challenges of the digital age, American politics and other emerging issues.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

Contact: Liberty Peralta

Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org

Phone: 808.462.5030

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

The Central Park Five

 

This film from award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns, tells the story of the five black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were wrongly convicted of raping a white woman in New York City’s Central Park in 1989. It chronicles The Central Park Jogger case, for the first time from the perspective of these five teenagers whose lives were upended by this miscarriage of justice. The film illuminates how law enforcement, social institutions and media undermined the very rights of the individuals they were designed to safeguard and protect.

 

BLACK AMERICA SINCE MLK: AND STILL I RISE
Keep Your Head Up / Touch the Sky

 

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explores America’s changing racial landscape-celebrating how far we have come toward equality and asking why we still have so far to go. Features conversations with Attorney General Eric Holder, activist DeRay Mckesson and television producer Shonda Rhimes.

 

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