respect

Listen to the Forest

Listen to the Forest

 

Listen to the Forest is an environmental documentary speaking to the widespread concern for rainforest preservation. It is about the Hawaiian Islands, and also about a Hawaiian way of feeling. A film for all ages emphasizing the powerful connection between a unique natural history and Hawaiʻi’s rich cultural life.

 

Combining interviews, traditional chants, and original songs and dances, this film gives voice to an order form of ecological wisdom summed up in the phrase malama ʻaina – to take care of the earth – which is both our physical home and a source of spiritual nourishment.

 

“Kamae charms viewers with his vision of Hawaiʻi as a place where all living things are conscious, where every living creature has a soul”
– Lee Quarnastrom, San Jose Mercury News

 

Source: hawaiianlegacyfoundation.org

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Biography Hawai‘i: Harriet Bouslog

PBS Presents Biography Hawaii: Harriet Bouslog

 

One of a handful of women lawyers practicing in Hawai‘i in the 1940’s and 50’s, Harriet Bouslog became a champion for the working class. With her partner Myer Symonds, she represented the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), fighting for fair labor laws and wages for the people of Hawai‘i. She was instrumental in ending the death penalty in the Territory of Hawai‘i and her efforts and public comments during the Hawaii Seven trial of alleged Communists led to her disbarment and subsequent reinstatement after a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court. Brilliant, vivacious, and controversial, Bouslog was one of Hawai‘i’s great defenders of human rights and dignity. This inspiring documentary combines interviews with family and friends, commentary by legal historians and photographs and film that recorded the life and times of this extraordinary woman.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
The Land of Eb

 

This fictional story is set in the stark volcanic landscape of one of the most remote communities on Hawai‘i Island – Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. Jonithen Jackson portrays Jacob, a Marshallese immigrant father and grandfather, who struggles to provide for his large family. When Jacob overhears a cancer diagnosis from his doctor he keeps the news to himself, forgoing treatment in favor of working to pay off his property which he plans to pass down once he’s gone. Sensing his end, Jacob turns a small video camera on himself and begins to record his story – and that of his people, the Marshallese. The film is a contemplative look at a community in Hawaii still struggling to recover from the effects of the nuclear age. It is a profoundly realistic portrayal of one man’s unwillingness to let go of his dignity and the hope he has for his family’s future.

 

More incumbents sitting out debates?

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: The set of INSIGHTS

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiGeneral Managers of PBS stations across the country met last month for a strategy session, looking at what kind of programming is needed most in our country, and how to make the content more responsive and more interactive.

 

And in this election year of deep divisions and negativity, we compared notes on our television stations’ political debates and other forums. Longtime station managers remarked that they’d never seen so many local incumbents decline to appear with their challengers on live telecasts and live web streams.

 

“These incumbents have the money to create their own messages through advertising, and that’s what they’re doing instead,” said Tom Axtell, the head of Vegas PBS and a member of the PBS Board of Directors. Another GM noted that many candidates no longer feel obligated to appear alongside their competition because they can speak to the public through low-cost social media.

 

In Hawai‘i, we had our share of incumbents turning down participation in our weekly election forum on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, noting scheduling conflicts. We know that candidates are busy, so we generally ask them early. And we realize that incumbents may not be terribly motivated to let their lesser-known competitors receive statewide air time.

 

In addition, incumbents from 34 Hawai‘i State House and Senate races faced no opposition from another major-party candidate.

 

We even had a challenger withdraw from a General Election forum. That was Honolulu Mayoral candidate and political veteran Charles Djou. His campaign contended that it had never committed to the forum. (Before the Primary Election, Djou did take part in our forum with incumbent Mayor Kirk Caldwell and former Mayor Peter Carlisle.)

 

The rebuffs by candidates in some major races had a silver lining, freeing up TV time for district races, especially outside Honolulu and beyond O‘ahu. Incumbents and challengers with different ideas sat down at the same table, engaging in some interesting, vigorous and respectful discussions.

 

Viewers could feel the fresh breeze of democracy. At its best, this civil discourse provided much-needed substance and helped voters make their choice at the polls.

 

As Communications Professor John Hart of Hawai‘i Pacific University commented in a Honolulu Civil Beat podcast with reporter Chad Blair last October 10: “I still believe [debates] are our best chance to see past the pseudo-events, the slick advertisements. When you hear someone talk for an hour, you get a sense of who they are.”

 

This public media organization wants to thank all of the election candidates who accepted our invitation to inform voters by answering viewer questions and taking part in civil discourse on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

A hui hou (until next time)…
Leslie signature

 

 

Challenging Waianae father-daughter relationship featured on PBS Hawaii’s HIKI NŌ

Press Release Header

 

HONOLULU, HI – A father-daughter relationship of the “tough love” kind will be featured on HIKI NŌ, Thurs., Jan. 28 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawaii.

 

Waianae High School students bring us the story of young wrestler Anuhea Hamilton and her challenging relationship with her father, Kimo Hamilton. Mr. Hamilton, a former wrestler himself, admits to pushing Anuhea hard so he can prepare his daughter for life after school. “It’s a cruel world out there,” he says.

 

http://pbshawaii.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/20160128_hikino_710_anuhea_hamilton_pressre.jpgFather and daughter often disagree and butt heads. However, Mr. Hamilton says: “There’s a difference between overbearing and old school. I’m old school.” In the end, father and daughter both come to the realization that their differences stem from a place of love and mutual respect.

 

Waipahu Intermediate School students host this episode, which will also feature these stories:

  • Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai tell the story of student Haley Gokan and her dog Harley, who has difficulty walking because of Canine Degenerative Myelopathy. Haley designed and built a wheelchair for Harley, giving him more mobility.
  • Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell us about a faith-based meals program, Feed My Sheep, that is helping the needy on the Valley Isle.
  • Students from Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu report on loopholes retailers are finding in Oahu’s plastic bag ban. Another story from the HIKI NŌ archives by H.P. Baldwin High School shows how retailers on Maui found innovative substitutes for plastic bags after Maui’s ban went into effect.
  • Students from Molokai High School tell us about a new program at their school called Text-A-Tip that helps students anonymously report suspicious activities on campus

This episode will be posted online after the broadcast premiere: pbshawaii.org/hikino

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release
Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS
Fishing Pono

 

Native Hawaiians on the island of Molokai are using ancient conservation methods to restore local fisheries. Featuring lifelong fisherman Kelson “Mac” Poepoe, whose fishing conservation program is based on historical practices, this story shows how a community turned the tide on a seemingly doomed resource.

 

A CHEF’S LIFE
R-E-S-P-E-C-T the Butterbean

 

A Chef’s Life is a cooking and documentary series that takes viewers inside the life of Chef Vivian Howard, who, with her husband Ben Knight, opens a fine dining restaurant in her small hometown in Eastern North Carolina. Each episode follows Vivian out of the kitchen and into cornfields, strawberry patches and hog farms as she hunts down the ingredients that inspire her menus. Using a chef’s modern sensibilities, Vivian explores Southern cuisine, past and present – one ingredient at a time. A celebration of true farm-to-table food, the series combines the action and drama of a high-pressure business with the joys and stresses of family life.

 

R-E-S-P-E-C-T the Butterbean
Vivian and Ben are on the cusp of opening their new restaurant, the Boiler Room, and they’re facing a new challenge: how to make a veggie burger stand out. Vivian chooses the beloved butterbean as the star of her new burger, but quickly learns that the bean is a straight up diva – the Aretha Franklin of the legume family – when it comes to growing conditions.