punishment

FRONTLINE
Death by Fire

 

Did Texas execute an innocent man? FRONTLINE re-investigates the case of Cameron Todd Willingham, who was executed for the arson deaths of his three children. The film asks new questions about a key prosecution witness and science that raises doubts about whether the fatal fire was really arson.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
They Call Us Monsters

 

This film takes viewers behind the walls of the Compound, the facility where Los Angeles houses its most violent juvenile criminals. To their advocates, they’re kids. To the system, they’re adults. To their victims, they’re monsters.

 

FRONTLINE
Last Days of Solitary

 

Follow what happens to recently released prisoners when they go from solitary to the streets. With extraordinary access to the Maine State Prison, the film examines the long-term effects of solitary confinement and efforts to reduce its use.

 

POV
The Return

 

In 2012, California amended its “Three Strikes” law, shortening the sentences of thousands of “lifers.” See this unprecedented reform through the eyes of freed prisoners, disrupted families and attorneys and judges wrestling with an untested law.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
The Perfect Crime

 

Re-examine the shocking story of Leopold and Loeb, two wealthy college students who murdered a 14-year-old boy in 1924 to prove they were smart enough to get away with it. Their trial set off a national debate about morality and capital punishment.

 

This program will encore Fri., Feb. 12, 11:00 pm

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Needs to be Done to Reduce Drug Abuse in Hawai‘i?

 

A decade after Hawai‘i’s high-profile War on Ice, crystal methamphetamine remains Hawai‘i’s No. 1 illegal drug threat. While prescription painkillers, heroin and other drugs are rising in use, officials say crystal meth is still linked to the most drug-trafficking crimes and the most drug-related deaths. INSIGHTS asks: what needs to be done to reduce drug abuse in Hawai‘i?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS
Fixing Juvie Justice

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS Fixing Juvie Justice

 

Young people are entering the juvenile justice system in surprising numbers, and they seem to emerge worse than when they entered. In this film, a co-production of National Geographic and Pacific Islanders in Communications, we see how a group of innovators applies the restorative justice principles of the Maori people of New Zealand to the mean streets of Baltimore.

 

In Maori villages of the past, a crime would put the community out of balance. Traditional Maori justice turns on the idea of restoring that balance. This film crosses the globe to a culturally sacred marae (meeting ground) where Judge Heemi Taumanu has established an alternative youth court that draws on these principles. Viewers see how people come together to resolve conflict in their own communities and all of the drama that unfolds when everyone is given a chance and encouraged to let emotions out. Can a community-based approach to justice derived from a structure conceived centuries ago in New Zealand give hope to the mean streets of the United States?