prison

Relocation Arkansas:
Aftermath of Incarceration

 

In 1942, nearly 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry were forced into internment camps, two of which were in Arkansas. This film tells the stories of the interred and their descendants.

 

FRONTLINE
Last Days of Solitary

 

Follow what happens to recently released prisoners when they go from solitary to the streets. With extraordinary access to the Maine State Prison, the film examines the long-term effects of solitary confinement and efforts to reduce its use.

 

NOVA
Escape from Nazi Alcatraz

 

Colditz Castle, a notorious prisoner of war camp in Nazi Germany, was supposed to be escape-proof. But in World War II, a group of British officers dreamt up an escape plan: in a secret attic workshop, they constructed a two-man glider out of bed sheets and floorboards. The plan was to fly to freedom from the roof of the castle, but the war ended before they could put it to the test. Now a team of aero engineers and carpenters rebuilds the glider in the same attic using the same materials and use a bathtub full of concrete to catapult the glider off the roof to find out if the legendary glider plan would have succeeded.

 

FRONTLINE
Out of Gitmo

 

Produced in collaboration with NPR, FRONTLINE presents the dramatic story of a Gitmo detainee released from the controversial U.S. prison after 14 years, and the struggle over freeing prisoners once deemed international terrorists. Also in this hour, FRONTLINE works with Retro Report to explore the untold history of the Guantanamo Bay prison.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Trials of Muhammad Ali

 

This documentary covers Muhammad Ali’s toughest bout: his battle to overturn his five-year prison sentence for refusing U.S. military service. The film traces a formative period in Ali’s life, one unknown to young people and neglected by those who remember him as a boxer but overlook how controversial he was when he first took center stage. When Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali, he found himself caught up in conflicts concerning civil rights, religion and wartime dissent. This film focuses on the years 1967 to 1970, when Ali lived in exile within the U.S., stripped of his heavyweight belt and banned from boxing, sacrificing fame and fortune on principle.

 

GENEALOGY ROADSHOW
Houston

 

Follow a diverse cast of participants on an emotional journey who use history and science to uncover their fascinating family stories. Each individual’s past is a link to a larger community history, revealing the rich cultural tapestry of America.

 

Houston
Investigate a re-enactor’s Texas roots; learn about Andersonville prison; find out if a black man’s ancestors fought for the Confederacy; and uncover one woman’s link to a prominent Texas figure and another’s connection to the Cherokee Freedman.

 

SECRETS OF THE DEAD
The Alcatraz Escape

 

The three convicts who escaped Alcatraz in rafts in 1962 were swept out to sea, never to be heard from again. Now, a team of scientists believes the escapees could have made it to dry land – but only if they left at a specific time.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Last Days in Vietnam

 

During the chaotic final days of the Vietnam War, as the North Vietnamese Army closed in on Saigon, the South Vietnamese resistance crumbled. The United States had only a skeleton crew of diplomats and military operatives still in the country. With a communist victory inevitable and the U.S. readying to withdraw, many Americans on the ground worried their South Vietnamese allies and friends faced imprisonment or death at the hands of the approaching North Vietnamese. With the clock ticking and the city under fire, a number of heroic Americans took matters into their own hands, engaging in unsanctioned and often makeshift operations in a desperate effort to save as many South Vietnamese as possible. A film by Rory Kennedy.

 

POV
Point and Shoot

 

Matt VanDyke was a recent college grad with a love of video games and action movies when he decided to embark on a “crash course in manhood.” With a motorcycle and a video camera, he set off on a life-changing 35,000-mile odyssey across North Africa and the Middle East that led to his participation in the 2011 Libyan revolution against Muammar Gaddafi and six-month imprisonment in Libya.

 

As VanDyke worked to reshape himself, he also helped create a stunning portrait of how the ever-present cameras in our “selfie society” not only record our lives, but also craft who we become.

 

Drawing from more than 100 hours of VanDyke’s videos, director Marshal Curry, with full creative independence in the making of the documentary, has created a riveting film that asks thorny questions about manhood, personal risk and the nature of war in the era of social media.

 

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