politics

FRONTLINE
Iraq Uncovered

 

FRONTLINE reports on what is happening on the ground in Iraq in areas where ISIS has been pushed out. Correspondent Ramita Navai makes a dangerous and revealing journey inside the war-torn country, investigating allegations of abuse of Sunni Muslim civilians by powerful Shia militias.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Should We Change The Minimum Wage to a Living Wage?

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: Should We Change The Minimum Wage To A Living Wage?

 

Despite taking Hawai‘i’s minimum wage up to $9.25 an hour – and a scheduled increase to $10.10 effective next year – Hawai‘i’s minimum wage workers are faced with an impossible challenge: the biggest gap nationally between a state’s minimum hourly wage and the most basic earnings required to meet the local cost of living. Should we change the minimum wage to a living wage?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

A Threat to Public Broadcasting’s “Spark”

Protect My Public Media

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiAt first, when Ronald Reagan launched his Presidency in 1981, he didn’t like the idea of federal monies going to fund PBS and NPR stations across the country.

 

Then he saw how public-service media stations leveraged a relatively small amount of federal funding to gain private donations. One federal dollar might turn into, say, eight dollars, with citizens, businesses and charitable foundations adding the weight of their support.

 

“Government should provide the spark and the private sector should do the rest,” President Reagan said.

 

We at PBS Hawai‘i believe this is a good public-private partnership, centered on education, public safety and civic leadership. Last year, 9.5 percent of our revenues came from the federal investment.

 

Now comes the Trump Administration, signaling its intention to “privatize” – meaning de-fund – the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the private nonprofit that distributes funds to public media stations. Other Administration targets are the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

As I write this, two weeks before publication, I’m getting ready to go to Washington, D.C. for a national public media summit, at which attendees will seek to determine President Trump’s plans. Is he really going to wage a battle against federal seed money for public broadcasting?

 

The public broadcasting community says the notion of eliminating the federal funding in its mission is “nothing new.” It points out that similar ideas have been “soundly rejected on a bipartisan basis.”

 

According to the industry publication Current, the chair of a key House Appropriations subcommittee, Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), predicts that such a move would fail because “there is a strong constituency for public broadcasting in both the House and Senate.”

 

Indeed, strong bipartisan support usually results in an appropriation of about $1.35 per year per American. Still, leaders of public broadcasting say they must take funding threats seriously. They’re asking to talk with Administration officials, and station general managers from all over the country are taking their case to Capitol Hill.

 

PBS Hawai‘i’s Board of Directors already has written to Hawai‘i’s Congressional delegates.

 

However, America’s Public Television Stations (APTS) isn’t calling out and mobilizing citizens at this time. Without a fleshed-out proposal from the Trump Administration, leaders are monitoring the situation closely. We are urging viewers to register your support at protectmypublicmedia.org.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Party of One

 

Since statehood, Hawai‘i Republicans have won major races, though the victories have been few and far between. In 58 years, there have been two governors, one U.S. Senator and two U.S. Representatives. Democrats have clearly dominated, but Republicans kept it competitive, at least in certain elections for specific races – until now.

 

Currently, the State Legislature is made up of 70 Democrats and six Republicans, with one Republican seriously considering switching parties. Nationally, the majority of governors are Republican, the GOP has momentum across the country and Republicans are in charge in Washington, D.C.

 

Why does our local Republican Party seem to be disappearing? Have Hawai‘i politics become a “Party of One”?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 




PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Biography Hawai‘i: Harriet Bouslog

PBS Presents Biography Hawaii: Harriet Bouslog

 

One of a handful of women lawyers practicing in Hawai‘i in the 1940’s and 50’s, Harriet Bouslog became a champion for the working class. With her partner Myer Symonds, she represented the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), fighting for fair labor laws and wages for the people of Hawai‘i. She was instrumental in ending the death penalty in the Territory of Hawai‘i and her efforts and public comments during the Hawaii Seven trial of alleged Communists led to her disbarment and subsequent reinstatement after a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court. Brilliant, vivacious, and controversial, Bouslog was one of Hawai‘i’s great defenders of human rights and dignity. This inspiring documentary combines interviews with family and friends, commentary by legal historians and photographs and film that recorded the life and times of this extraordinary woman.

 

John Lewis
Get in the Way

 

Follow the journey of civil rights hero and human rights champion, U.S. Congressman John Lewis. At the Selma March, Lewis came face-to-face with club-wielding troopers and exemplified non-violence.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Kumu Hina

 

Over the course of a momentous year, Kumu Hina, a native Hawaiian mahu (transgender) teacher, inspires a tomboyish young girl to claim her place as leader of an all-male hula troupe, as Kumu Hina herself searches for love and a fulfilling romantic relationship with an unpredictable young Tongan man.

 

FRONTLINE
Trump’s Road to the White House

 

An investigation of how Donald Trump defied expectations to win the presidency. Through interviews with key players, the film shows how Trump rallied millions of supporters, defeated adversaries, and whom he’s bringing into the White House with him.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
A Conversation with Our Four Mayors

 

With a new year, newly seated City and County Councils across our state, and a new State legislative session, INSIGHTS welcomes Hawai‘i’s four mayors for this live conversation: Maui County’s Alan Arakawa, Oahu’s Kirk Caldwell, Kaua‘i’s Bernard Carvalho and Hawai‘i County’s Harry Kim. Among other topics, they’ll discuss increasing divisions across the island chain, and how each county can work together as part of a unified state.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I is a live public affairs show that is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, or Twitter during the broadcast. You may email us ahead of time toinsights@pbshawaii.org, or include the #pbsinsights hashtag when posting on Twitter.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 




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