physician

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Hastening Death When Death is Inevitable

 

For the 12th time since 1998, Hawai‘i lawmakers will consider legislation on physician-aid-in-dying. Should the current House bill pass, Hawai‘i would become the seventh state in the country to legalize this controversial end-of-life alternative for people suffering from terminal illness.

 

Hawai‘i House Bill 201 allows a terminally ill adult with the capacity to make an informed healthcare decision to request a prescription for aid-in-dying medication from their attending physician to facilitate a peaceful death.

 

On the next INSIGHTS, strong arguments will be made for both sides of this debate currently being heard by our state lawmakers. Will Hawai‘i be the next state to legalize hastening death when death is inevitable?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Kua O ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy: Traditional Opelu Fishing

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kua O ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy Public Charter School on Hawaii Island tell the story of traditional opelu fishing in the remote South Kona fishing village of Milolii. For many Milolii residents, opelu fishing is more than a tradition – it is a means of survival. Families sell their catch as their main source of income and are trying to pass the practice down to their children so that the tradition and income source can continue.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a local church group that provides free laundry services for the needy.

 

Students from Wheeler Middle School in Central Oahu profile a recently arrived military dependent who has fallen in love with the hula.

 

Continuing the theme of outsiders embracing Hawaiian culture, a mainland transplant becomes the Hawaiian Studies teacher at St. Andrew’s Priory in Honolulu (a story from the HIKI NŌ archives).

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island show us how they are inspired by a Hilo physician who, as a high school student, was the least likely person to ever become a doctor.

 

And from Mililani Middle School in Central Oahu, a special needs language arts teacher expresses himself by painting large, colorful portraits.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 11 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 12 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

FRONTLINE
Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria

 

FRONTLINE investigates the alarming rise of untreatable infections: from a young girl thrust onto life support in an Arizona hospital, to a young American infected in India who comes home to Seattle, and an uncontrollable outbreak at the nation’s most prestigious hospital, where 18 patients were mysteriously infected and six died, despite frantic efforts to contain the killer bacteria. Fueled by decades of antibiotic overuse, the crisis has deepened as major drug companies, squeezed by Wall Street expectations, have abandoned the development of new antibiotics.

 

NOVA
Vaccines: Calling the Shots

 

Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago – including whooping cough, measles and mumps – are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. Go around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations and discover the risks of opting out.

 

Dr. Wayne Dyer:
I Can See Clearly Now

 

In the most personal program of his career, Dr. Wayne Dyer offers an intimate conversation about what his own personal experiences have taught him: There are no accidents, and all the choices we make and actions we take weave a life tapestry uniquely our own. Exploring the five principles that have guided his own choices, Dr. Dyer shows why it is important to have – and act on – a burning desire, why life’s lowest moments can reveal our true purpose, and how the principle of love allows us to see our lives more clearly and reach our greatest awareness.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Can We Better Care for People Who Suffer from Serious Mental Illness?


People who suffer from mental illness in Hawai‘i often have difficulty being diagnosed and finding and accepting treatment. Some end up on the streets, exacerbating an already booming homeless population. And Hawai‘i’s only state mental hospital is overcrowded, with some employees saying it’s unsafe for patients and staff. How can we better care for people who suffer from serious mental illness?

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I is a live public affairs show that is also live streamed on PBSHawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, or Twitter. You may also email your questions ahead of time toinsights@pbshawaii.org.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Should Hawai‘i Require Vaccinations for All Healthy Children?


Measles outbreaks linked to unvaccinated children on the mainland have many in Hawai‘i questioning whether our vaccination requirements are strong enough to prevent an outbreak here. Although several vaccinations are required to attend public schools, parents who believe the shots are dangerous or unnecessary can seek exemptions for religious and medical reasons. But now that the nearly eradicated measles virus has returned, should exemptions for healthy children still be allowed? Malia Mattoch moderates this discussion.

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I is a live public affairs show that is also live streamed on PBSHawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, Twitter or live blogging. You may also email your questions ahead of time toinsights@pbshawaii.org.