PBS Hawai‘i Presents

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
ʻike – Knowledge is Everywhere

 

In his documentary, ‘ike: Knowledge is Everywhere, filmmaker Matthew Nagato could have pointed out everything that’s wrong with public education in Hawai‘i. Instead, Nagato set out to accent the positive, by sharing stories of trailblazers in Hawai‘i who are creating and implementing innovative programs to improve public education. “We want people to strive, to get to places, to do things, and not just sit around and accept the status quo, simply because it’s difficult. I choose the route that gives people the hope, the opportunity and the belief,” Nagato stated in an interview.

 

Immediately following the film, Insights on PBS Hawai‘i will sit down with filmmaker Nagato; Candy Suiso, who created Searider Productions at Wai‘anae High School; Zachery Grace from Matt Levi’s Lawakua Kajukenbo martial arts club; and Waipahu High School Principal Keith Hayashi, one of the innovators featured in the film.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Kid Kine Kurses

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS Kid Kine Kurses

 

Kid Kine Kurses harkens back to the days when local people didn’tlock their doors, kids played outside until the sun went down and friends and family got together to talk story.

 

In Lemon Tree Billiard House (1996), written by Cedric Yamanaka, Dean Kaneshiro plays a young pool hustler who believes that he was cursed as a young child. He plays the match of his life against an older version of himself…cocky, talented and also cursed. Together they face their demons over the pool table. The older pool hustler is played tongue-in-cheek by the late Ray Bumatai. The late James Grant Benton plays an exorcist, and familiar face Dan Seki plays the owner of the Lemon Tree Billiard House. Directed by Tim Savage.

 

Dancing With The Long Bone (1996) tells the story of a young girl who finds a bone buried in the forest. Innocently, she brings the bone home and a series of suspicious events unfold around her and her loved ones. The spirit of a pig hunter haunts her dreams and eventually she realizes the steps she needs to take to restore peace in her life and her household. Natalie Young stars as Mina, the young girl who learns the lesson of respect for those who have passed; Karen Keawehawaii brings her exceptional talents to the role of Minaʻs aunty; and Henry Kapono makes a cameo appearance as the pig hunter. From a story by Nora Cobb-Keller.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
The Hawaiian Room

 

The Hawaiian Room, located in the famed Lexington Hotel, was an oasis of Hawaiian culture and entertainment in the heart of New York City. Between 1937 and 1966, hundreds of dancers, singers and musicians from Hawai‘i were recruited to perform at the entertainment venue. In this documentary, filmmaker Ann Marie Kirk shares interviews with over 20 former performers who speak candidly and fondly of their experience at the historic nightclub, and the culture shock of going from Hawai‘i to New York City.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Hawaiian Masterpieces: Ka Hana Kapa

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS Hawaiian Masterpieces: Ka Hana Kapa

 

This film follows present-day kapa makers through the kapa-making process. Marie McDonald and her daughter, Roen Hufford, create kapa using the same types of tools and methods that ancient Hawaiians used. The program culminates with the dressing of a hula halau in Hawaiian kapa for the Merrie Monarch Festival.

 

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS
The Quietest Place on Earth

 

On the island of Maui, Haleakala rises 10,000 feet – nearly two miles – into the sky. The massive crater located at its summit carries the unique distinction of being “the quietest place on Earth.” The exquisite stillness of its stark volcanic landscape inspires a variety of experiences ranging from spiritual to philosophical. Featured are musical artist Keola Beamer, poet W.S. Merwin, cultural specialist Clifford Nae’ole, paniolo Wilfred Souza and others.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
The Land of Eb

 

This fictional story is set in the stark volcanic landscape of one of the most remote communities on Hawai‘i Island – Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. Jonithen Jackson portrays Jacob, a Marshallese immigrant father and grandfather, who struggles to provide for his large family. When Jacob overhears a cancer diagnosis from his doctor he keeps the news to himself, forgoing treatment in favor of working to pay off his property which he plans to pass down once he’s gone. Sensing his end, Jacob turns a small video camera on himself and begins to record his story – and that of his people, the Marshallese. The film is a contemplative look at a community in Hawaii still struggling to recover from the effects of the nuclear age. It is a profoundly realistic portrayal of one man’s unwillingness to let go of his dignity and the hope he has for his family’s future.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Hidden Legacy: Japanese Traditional Performing Arts in the WWII Internment Camps

 

Using historical footage and interviews from artists who were interned, this film tells the story of how traditional Japanese cultural arts were maintained at a time when the War Relocation Authority emphasized the importance of assimilation and Americanization. Included are stories of artists in the fields of music, dance and drama who were interned at Tule Lake, Manzanar, Amache/Granada, Rohwer, Gila River and Topaz.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Ma Ka Malu Ali‘i: The Legacy of Hawaii’s Ali‘i

Ma Ka Malu Ali'i: The Legacy of Hawaii's Ali'i

 

The 19th century was a time of devastating change for the Hawaiian people. This documentary looks at the visionary efforts of five members of the ali’i, Hawaiian royalty, to provide for the education of the children, healthcare and comfort for the elderly. The charitable institutions they created have endured and are thriving and vital institutions today.

 

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