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On March 8, Whole Foods Market will donate 5% of Hawai‘i net sales to PBS Hawai‘i

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

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Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo are among those from the 90 public, private and charter schools across the Islands in HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i’s flagship digital learning initiative, which will benefit from Whole Foods Market’s Community Giving Day.HONOLULU – Whole Foods Market Hawai‘i has selected PBS Hawai‘i as its statewide nonprofit partner for its upcoming Community Giving Day on Wednesday, March 8.

 

Pictured: Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo are among those from the 90 public, private and charter schools across the Islands in HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i’s flagship digital learning initiative, which will benefit from Whole Foods Market’s Community Giving Day.

 

That day, five percent of net sales from all three Whole Foods Market locations in Hawai‘i – Kahala and Kailua on O‘ahu, and Kahului on Maui – will go toward supporting PBS Hawai‘i’s mission of advancing learning and discovery through its video programming.

 

Whole Foods Market hosts Community Giving Days twice a year to benefit local nonprofits. These initiatives are part of the company’s core values and commitment to serving and supporting local and global communities.

 

“We are thrilled to partner with PBS Hawai‘i, as we have a shared interest in providing the highest quality products,” says Annalee England, Whole Foods Market Kahului Store Team Leader. “Whole Foods Market does so through our selection of the best natural, organic and locally sourced foods, and PBS Hawai‘i through their incomparable programming for the whole family.”

 

PBS Hawai‘i’s statewide digital learning initiative, HIKI NŌ, will benefit from the Community Giving Day. Through this program, PBS Hawai‘i offers free digital storytelling training for the program’s 90 participating public, private and charter schools across the Islands. The student video stories that result from this training are showcased online at pbshawaii.org, and on Thursday nights at 7:30 on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Since its launch in 2011, HIKI NŌ has served more than 4,800 students. More than half of HIKI NŌ schools are Title I, the federal designation of schools with at least 40 percent of students coming from low-income families.

 

“With HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i is bridging serious educational and socioeconomic gaps,” says Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO. “This partnership with Whole Foods Market will help us with this important work in our island communities – some as near as those in PBS Hawai‘i’s own neighborhood of Kalihi, and as far and remote as South Point on Hawai‘i Island.”

 

Other programs produced locally by PBS Hawai‘i include the live, weekly community affairs program Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, the half-hour interview program Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox and the Hawaiian music series Na Mele.

 

As the Islands’ only member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service, PBS Hawai‘i carries flagship PBS programs, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Independent Lens, NOVA, Frontline and educational children’s programming on PBS KIDS.

 

PBS Hawai‘i is also one of a handful of PBS stations in the country to carry a live feed of English-language international news coverage from Japanese public broadcaster NHK World.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Two-Year $50,000 Grant from Central Pacific Bank Foundation to PBS Hawaii for NEW HOME

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HONOLULU, HI —The Central Pacific Bank Foundation has made a two-year, $50,000 donation to PBS Hawaii for the renovation and construction of the public television station’s new facility.

 

Pictured from left to right are CPB Senior VP and General Counsel Glenn Ching; CPB Foundation President Denis Isono; Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii CEO; PBS Hawaii Board Members Bettina Mehnert and Kent Tsukamoto.

 

Construction of PBS Hawaii’s 21st-century NEW HOME, The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus, began in November 2014, and is rising in a graceful curve on Nimitz Highway at the entrance to Sand Island. Hawaii’s only public television station is in the homestretch of capital fundraising, having reached over $26.5 of a $30 million campaign goal.

 

The structure will house a main television studio, a “Learning Zone” for students and teachers, and spaces that promote collaboration and partnerships for innovation.

 

“We are honored to support organizations such as PBS Hawaii that share our commitment to create a better Hawaii,” said CPB Foundation President Denis Isono. “PBS Hawaii already does great work within our state, and the new facility will help to further their reach by enhancing programming and providing additional learning opportunities.”

 

“It is such a great honor to receive this very generous donation from the Central Pacific Bank Foundation,” said Robbie Alm, PBS Hawaii Board Chair. “CPB has had to overcome tremendous odds to even be here today and to be a reflection of their return to great health makes it even more special.”

 

For more information on PBS Hawaii’s NEW HOME, naming opportunities or to contribute toward the project’s completion, visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

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Contact: Emily Bodfish
Email: ebodfish@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1169

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Where can I watch PBS Hawai‘i programming?

View our comprehensive list of broadcast, cable and satellite channels on our Where to Watch Us page.

 

Who owns PBS Hawai‘i?

PBS Hawai‘i, a Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) member station, is a community-supported public television station licensed to the Hawai‘i Public Television Foundation. A 20 – 25 member volunteer Board of Directors made up of Hawai‘i citizens directs the policies carried out by PBS Hawai‘i’s staff and volunteers.

 

Where does PBS Hawai‘i get its operating funds?

PBS Hawai‘i relies in large part upon contributions from individual viewers and support from local businesses and charitable foundations. We also qualify for grants from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and receive 1% of proceeds from the cable franchise fee.

 

What is the biggest financial challenge facing PBS Hawai‘i?

PBS Hawai‘i faces the constant challenge of upgrading aging equipment and facilities. Additionally, costs to acquire and broadcast our quality programming have risen substantially over the past few years. Unlike commercial stations, one of the largest sources of our revenue is our individual supporters, who help ensure that we can afford the $1.6 million it costs to purchase and air new shows each year.

 

Why is PBS Hawai‘i worthy of support?

As a non-profit organization, PBS Hawai‘i is truly Hawai‘i’s community station. First, no other station offers you the breadth and depth of programming that PBS Hawai‘i does. Second, no other station offers you the quality of programming that PBS Hawai‘i does, and lastly, no other station showcases the arts and talents of all people or highlights the concern of communities here in Hawai‘i, across the country, and around the world. PBS Hawaii doesn’t create programs to make money, we raise money to create meaningful programs for you and all the people of Hawai‘i. PBS Hawai‘i is the only locally owned TV broadcaster in the State of Hawai‘i.

 

Why did you replace my favorite program?

We receive our programs from a wide range of sources, including satellite delivery and local production in our own facility. On rare occasions these services may fail to deliver a needed program in time for its broadcast or the program received is not broadcast quality. Consequently, it may necessitate changes to our schedule. Whenever possible, we do make every effort to alert viewers and inform them if and when the show will be rescheduled through our program guide, here on our website, Facebook and Twitter.