New Zealand

GLOBE TREKKER
Food Hour: Southern China

GLOBE TREKKER - Food Hour: Southern China

 

Celebrated New Zealand chef Peter Gordon discovers the roots of Cantonese cuisine. Peter’s journey takes him north to Lianzhou, the mountain home of the Yao tribe, where he cooks succulent spiced pork. Next he walks the rice fields of the Pearl River Delta, and meets traditional medical doctors in Foshan. He also cooks up a strength-giving feast for dragon boat racing crews in Guangzhou, shops in the fabled market of Qingping and samples street fare in Chaozhou.

 

Pacific Heartbeat

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT, now in its sixth season, is an anthology series that provides viewers with a glimpse of the real Pacific – its people, cultures and contemporary issues.  The series features a diverse array of programs that will draw viewers into the heart and soul of Pacific Island culture.

 

Pacific Heartbeat Season 6 premieres in May 2017 on PBS Hawaiʻi.

 

A co-presentation of Pacific Islanders in Communications and PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Visions in the Dark: The Life of Pinky Thompson

Saturday, May 6, 2017, 8 pm

Visions in the Dark: The Life of Pinky Thompson is a Hawaiian story of pain and promise, of challenge and triumph and a story of leadership.  Sustaining a serious eye wound in Normandy during WWII that left him in the dark for two years, Myron “Pinky” Thompson emerged with a clear vision of his purpose in life.  Thompson would go on to be a social worker, mentor and revered leader in the Native Hawaiian community who left a legacy of positive social change, pride in Pacific heritage and a strong sense of native identity among Hawaiians that flourishes today.

 

Ever the Land

Saturday, May 13, 2017, 8 pm

Ever The Land explores the sublime bond between people and their land.  For the past 150 years, longstanding grievances over extreme colonization tactics have defined the Ngāi (tribe) Tūhoe and New Zealand governments relationship.  In 2014 history was made when the Tūhoe’s ancestral homelands were returned, the New Zealand government gave a official apology and Tūhoe built the first ever “Living Building” in Aotearoa New Zealand as a testament to their values and vision of self-governance.

 

Next Goal Wins

Saturday, May 20, 2017, 8 pm

In 2001, the tiny Pacific island of American Samoa suffered a world record 31-0 defeat at the hands of Australia, garnering headlines across the world as the worst football team on the planet. Next Goal Wins is an inspirational story about the power of hope in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds, and an object lesson in what it really means to be a winner in life.

 

Mele Murals

Saturday, May 27, 2017, 8 pm

Mele Murals is a documentary about the transformative power of art through the unlikely union of graffiti and ancient Hawaiian culture.  At the center of the story are two renowned street artists – Estria Miyashiro (aka Estria) and John Hina (aka Prime) – a group of Native Hawaiian youth, and the rural community of Waimea.  Through their stories Mele Murals shows how public art and Native Hawaiian traditions transforms the artists, students and community.

 

 

AURORA
Fire in the Sky

 

Examine legends about the origins and meaning of the aurora, the colorful glow that often brightens the night sky in Earth’s polar regions. Investigate the myths of Finland’s Saami, Alaska’s Inuit, Canada’s Native Americans and New Zealand’s Maori.

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
A Place to Call Home

 

Feel the pulse of the pacific – the stories of its people, cultures, languages music, and contemporary issues – in Season 5 of PACIFIC HEARTBEAT, the nationally distributed series from Pacific Islanders in Communications and PBS Hawaii. The five films in this season highlight struggles, values and victories that draw us together and make our Pacific cultures unique.

 

A Place to Call Home
In New Zealand, the government is about to sell off a third of its publicly owned state houses. Two women are at odds over a plan to rebuild a community with houses taken from the other. What can become of a new Maori approach to social housing that is separate from the state? And what becomes of a community that no longer has social housing?

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Road to The Globe

 

In 2010, the home of Shakespeare – The Globe Theatre in London, England – issued a proclamation outlining the world’s biggest Shakespearean festival: 36 countries, 36 Shakespearean plays, 36 languages. New Zealand actor Rawiri Paratene answered the call and was given the honor of opening the festival. Spanning the twelve-week period before opening night, the film follows Rawiri as he forms his own company, Ngakau Toa, consisting of New Zealand’s best Maori actors, and their journey as they prepare to take their Maori adaption of William Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida to The Globe.

 

NOVA
Lethal Seas

 

Marine scientists across the world are hunting for clues to one of the greatest environmental catastrophes facing our planet today: ocean acidification. For years we’ve known the ocean absorbs about a quarter of the carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere. But as carbon emissions continue to rise, seawater chemistry is changing, and the ocean’s acidity is increasing. As a result, the skeletons and shells of marine creatures that form the foundation of the web of life are dissolving. Follow scientists who are seeking solutions and making breakthrough discoveries, including a unique coral garden in Papua New Guinea that offers a glimpse of what the seas could be like in a half-century.

 

HIKI NŌ
hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School on the north shore of Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Why Are There So Many Mexican Restaurants in Kapaa?
Kapaa High School on Kauai explores why there are so many Mexican restaurants – 9, to be exact – in their small town of Kapaa, where there is only one Starbucks. In spite of the availability of so much Mexican food, restaurant owners don’t feel that they are in competition with each other as they offer regional specialties from Mexico that distinguish their offerings. Besides the popularity of Mexican food, the increasing Mexican population in Hawaii may be a reason for the proliferation of restaurants.

 

Also Featured:
Punahou School’s Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau Sails on Hokulea
Middle school students at Punahou School on Oahu feature their teacher, Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau, who recently sailed to New Zealand on Hokulea’s Malama Honua worldwide voyage. Kaniela’s mother was among Hokulea’s original crew, which instilled in him at a young age deep values for the ocean and how important it is to take care of each other.

 

Two Ladies Kitchen in Hilo
Waiakea High School on Hawaii Island visits Two Ladies Kitchen, which serves up over twenty flavors of mochi. The shop started with a family recipe and seven flavors and has grown, making it a popular stop for locals and visitors alike, and where kitchen staff have become family.

 

Pohole Salad A Hana Specialty
Hana K-12 School in East Maui shares how to make pohole salad, a popular dish in Hana that’s served at community gatherings and special events. It’s made from the pohole fern that grows in patches around Hana.

 

Master Storyteller Thomas Cummings
Kalani High School students in East Honolulu feature Uncle Tom Cummings, who has been telling stories for over forty years, weaving Hawaiian culture, mythology, history and values into tales that he started learning as a child. He captivates audiences using objects and “stuff” to illustrate his storytelling.

 

Na Hoku Hano Hano Award Winner Mark Yamanaka
Mid Pacific Institute students in the Manoa district of Oahu had an opportunity to interview award winning Hawaiian musician Mark Yamanaka and listen to his musical stylings. Yamanaka shares one of the biggest challenges of his life – not being of Hawaiian ancestry and wanting to play Hawaiian music.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 16 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 17 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.