Maui

HIKI NŌ
Episode #820

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu tell the story of Jimmy Lee, an eighty-six year old O‘ahu resident who witnessed the attack on Pearl Harbor when he was an eleven-year-old boy. Images of the planes and the bombing are etched in Lee’s memory. Even today, when Lee looks up at the sky in the Pearl Harbor area he can “see the planes and hear the bombing.” Lee uses his vivid memories to teach school children about the event that launched the U.S. into World War II and changed his life forever. He also volunteers as a guide for the National Park Service to share his vivid memories with visitors.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Waiakea High School in the Hilo area of Hawai‘i Island tell the story of an athlete whose most formidable opponent is his own case of Type 1 Diabetes.

 

–Students from Montessori School of Maui in Makawao show us how to make a stress ball out of balloons.

 

–Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu follow a piano teacher’s long journey to fulfilling her life’s purpose.

 

–Students from Island School on Kaua‘i find out how foreign exchange students at their school compare life in Germany to life in Hawai‘i.

 

–Students from Ke Kula Ni‘ihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kaua‘i tell the story of how their new principal – a native of Ni‘ihau – finally agreed to take on the responsibility of running their school.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 3, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 4, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
Henry Rice

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Henry Rice

 

Join us as Leslie Wilcox welcomes Henry Rice to Long Story Short.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #821

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Kinichi Ishikawa, a 98-year-old, 442nd Regimental Combat Team veteran who has been a farmer since the age of fourteen. Now nearing the century mark, Mr. Ishikawa farms taro at Waikoko Farms on Kaua‘i eight hours a day, rain or shine. Although he only finished grammar school, Mr. Ishikawa teaches the current owners of Waikoko Farms many valuable lessons in subjects such as long range planning.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Saint Francis School on O‘ahu tell the story of a successful ocean photographer who gives back to the community and the environment.

 

–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui show us how to tie a necktie with a Windsor knot.

 

–Students from Maui High School feature female students who are excelling in STEM-related subjects once dominated by males.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a teacher/professional bodybuilder who happens to be a single dad.

 

–Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu show how a deaf mother appreciates her son’s musical performances, even though she can’t hear them.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 10, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 11, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #823

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge, in which production teams from HIKI NŌ schools took the challenge of creating stories on the theme Mālama Honua (Taking Care of Our Island Planet) over three days. The theme – which is based on the mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s world-wide voyage – was revealed to the students at the beginning of the three-day production time limit.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu present their interpretation of Mālama Honua in a story about Veronika Sumyatina, a foreign exchange student from war-torn Ukraine who finds a new home, and the meaning of aloha, at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School. Veronika explains that home is much more than a roof over one’s head – home is “where your heart is.” By accepting an outsider as one of their own, the Nānākuli students do their part in taking care of our island planet.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu feature a female angler whose love of fishing is matched only by her respect for the eco-system from which she partakes.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu follow a woman who volunteers to mend and replace the pedestrian walking flags that keep people safe when crossing the very dangerous Farrington Highway.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature the OSPCA, a non-profit organization that cares for abandoned and neglected cats and dogs.

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu follow a group of motivated community members who are cleaning up Kawainui Marsh in Kailua.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Upcountry Maui show how recycling is a way of life on their campus.

 

–Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu follow the eco-friendly phenomenon of Hydro Flasks.

 

This episode is hosted by Hali‘amaile Kealoha and Hulukoa Nunokawa, both seniors at Kamehameha School Kapālama.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 13, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, May 14, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS
The Quietest Place on Earth

 

On the island of Maui, Haleakala rises 10,000 feet – nearly two miles – into the sky. The massive crater located at its summit carries the unique distinction of being “the quietest place on Earth.” The exquisite stillness of its stark volcanic landscape inspires a variety of experiences ranging from spiritual to philosophical. Featured are musical artist Keola Beamer, poet W.S. Merwin, cultural specialist Clifford Nae’ole, paniolo Wilfred Souza and others.

 

Lahaina: Waves of Change (2007)

 

In 1999, Lahaina’s plantation era came to an end with the closing of the West Maui town’s Pioneer Mill, the beating heart of Lahaina’s sugar industry. This film documents the last harvest, the last cane burning and the final days of operation at the mill, revealing a town with great historical and sacred significance, as well as the persistence to thrive into the future.

 





Luther Kahekili Makekau:
A One Kine Hawaiian Man (1997)

 

Winner of the Audience Award for Best Documentary at the Hawaii International Film Festival, this film constructs a rich portrait of a colorful and controversial Hawaiian man. Born on Maui in 1890 during the reign of King Kalākaua, Luther Makekau was part philosopher and part outlaw, a chanter, singer and poet, as well as a fighter and a cattle rustler, known throughout the islands for both his passion and his rebellious nature.

 





THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards
Part Two

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ features highlights from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards live-streamed announcements of the winners.

 

On Saturday, March 11th, the results of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards were announced by PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā in a four-island, closed-circuit, live-stream awards show originating from the PBS Hawai‘i studio on O‘ahu. HIKI NŌ teachers and students from the nominated schools gathered at their respective locations to watch the announcements: Paliku Theatre at Windward Community College on O‘ahu; McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center on Maui; the Kaua‘i Marriott Resort on Kaua‘i; Honua Studios in Kona; and the Waiakea High School library in Hilo. Each time an award was announced, the teacher and students from the winning school came onstage to accept their award from a PBS Hawai‘i Board member: a bronze medal for third place, silver for second place and gold for first. Gold medalists also won a $1,000 gift card to purchase equipment for their school’s media program.

 

This episode picks up where we left off in last week’s show by featuring the medal-winning schools (and their projects) for Best Franchise Piece, Best Factoid, Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing, Best Overall Story Middle School Division, and Best Overall Story High School Division.

 

This program encores Saturday, April 1 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, April 2 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards
Part One

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ features highlights from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards live-streamed announcements of the winners.

 

On Saturday, March 11th, the results of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards were announced by PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā in a four-island, closed-circuit, live-stream awards show originating from the PBS Hawai‘i studio on O‘ahu. HIKI NŌ teachers and students from the nominated schools gathered at their respective locations to watch the announcements: Paliku Theatre at Windward Community College on O‘ahu; McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center on Maui; the Kaua‘i Marriott Resort on Kaua‘i; Honua Studios in Kona; and the Waiakea High School library in Hilo. Each time an award was announced, the teacher and students from the winning school came onstage to accept their award from a PBS Hawai‘i Board member: a bronze medal for third place, silver for second place and gold for first. Gold medalists also won a $1,000 gift card to purchase equipment for their school’s media program.

 

This episode features the medal-winning schools (and their stories) for Best Personal Profile Middle School Division, Best Personal Profile High School Division, Best Writing Middle School Division and Best Writing High School Division.

 

The remainder of the awards will be covered in next week’s show: The 2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS, Part 2.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 25 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, March 26 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


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