Maui Waena Intermediate School

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Ike pono

This episode is the fifth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘ike pono, which means to know what is right. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui Waena Intermediate School who feature Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often in trouble with the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. His motivation for opening the business was not to make money, but to provide his family and community with healthy snacks, to employ people who need a helping hand (like he did), and to encourage his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods. “I went from someone who wasn’t doing Maui any good to someone who is making a difference,” says Cousins.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sosefina Matautia, once a self-professed bully at Waianae Intermediate School, decided to do the right thing and change her ways. While becoming a kinder, better person benefitted those around her, Sosefina was motivated to change because of her own dreams of someday becoming a doctor.

 

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui): Led by math teacher Debi Davis, Seabury Hall Middle School students do the right thing for the less fortunate by weaving colorful yarn hats that are distributed around the world to help brighten the lives of underprivileged children.

 

Kealakehe High School (Hawaii Island): Students and other community members in Kona do the right thing by banding together to build Habitat for Humanity homes for families on the Hawaiian Homes wait list.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): Sometimes doing what you know is right requires great sacrifice. Sometimes doing what is right means doing less for yourself. Such is the case with Waianae High School student Daisy Agae, whose grades suffer because she has to take care of her two younger brothers, one of whom is a special needs child born with debilitating medical conditions.

 

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (Hawaii Island): Hawaii Island resident William ”Black” Abraham was headed down the wrong path as a young adult, until he decided to do the right thing and dedicate his life to saving lives. He did so by becoming an Ocean Safety Officer at Hapuna Beach and is now inspiring the next generation of lifesavers through his Junior Lifeguard training program.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui High (Maui): An East Maui couple do the right thing by taking in and caring for animals with debilitating and life-threatening illnesses. As a result, their home has become the East Maui Animal Refuge, more affectionately known as the Boo-Boo Zoo. This episode is hosted by Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #819

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu present a story on the Hawai‘i-themed artwork engraved on the columns of O‘ahu’s rail project. The column art was designed by local architect Daniel Kanekuni and, according to HART spokesperson Bill Brennan, adds a sense of place and local identity to the rail project. Rail proponents and opponents alike feel that the column artwork is a good thing. However, some rail opponents, such as UH Professor of Civil Engineering Panos Prevedouros, feel that the real eye-sore will be the elevated rail stations. Says Prevedouros, “How much lipstick do they think they can put on that pig?”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School show how a Kahului family’s mochi- pounding tradition continues, despite the recent loss of the family matriarch who had been the heart of the event.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Technology Academy in Leeward O‘ahu show us the proper way to pack a military care package.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island profile a Konawaena graduate who went on to form the internationally renowned heavy metal reggae band Pepper.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a lesbian couple at their school who work to spread the joy of diversity and the message of tolerance for those who are different.

 

–Students from Maui High School profile a star athlete who had to sit out the football season because of a heart condition but continued to inspire his teammates by volunteering as an assistant coach.

 

This program encores Saturday, April 15, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, April 16, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #808 – Teachers of the Year

 

Of the eight Hawai‘i Department of Education District Teachers of the Year for the 2016-2017 school year, two are HIKI NŌ teachers: Luane Higuchi from Wai‘anae Intermediate School (Leeward District), and Jennifer Suzuki from Maui Waena Intermediate School (Maui District). Both teachers discuss what the District Teacher of the Year honor means to them, and the impact HIKI NŌ has had on them and their students.

 

This program encores Saturday, Jan. 14 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 15 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Values Compilation

 

This episode is a compilation of stories that express the six Hawaiian values featured in the first round of the 2015-16 season. Here are the Hawaiian values featured and the stories that represent them:

 

Ho’omau (to persevere, perpetuate or continue) is represented by a story from Maui High School, which follows former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles Adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia is used to battling opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan. But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere against an enemy she is not familiar with – uncertainty.

 

Kuleana (responsibility) is represented by a story from Waianae High School in West Oahu. Waianae High School graduate and UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fighter Max Holloway feels it is his kuleana to represent the Waianae community in the most positive way possible when he competes. Max also takes his responsibilities to his wife and young son very seriously. Having been severely neglected by his own parents, Max wants to make sure his son does not have to suffer the same sort of childhood that he had.

 

Ha’aha’a (humbleness and humility) is represented by a story from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai. Kauai resident Moses Hamilton learned humbleness and humility when he had to start all over again after a car accident that left him a quadriplegic. While undergoing rehab, Moses took up mouth painting (painting by holding and manipulating the paint brush in one’s mouth), and is a now a successful artist who sells his paintings in Hanalei.

 

‘Imi na’auao (enlightenment and wisdom) is represented by a story from Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people – learning the culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

‘Ike Pono (to know what is right) is represented by a story from Maui Waena Intermediate School about Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often on the wrong side the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. He encourages his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods.

 

Mālama (to care for, protect and maintain) is represented by a story from Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu, about the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its community of volunteers to mālama the Hawaiian Monk Seal. Mālama is also represented by a video primer from Kauai High School on how to “take care” in the event of a hurricane.

 

This episode is hosted by HIKI NŌ alum (and current Political Science/ Communications double-major at UH Manoa) Shisa Kahaunaele.

 

This program encores Saturday, Jan. 7 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #805

 

TOP STORY
Students from Volcano Arts & Sciences School on Hawai‘i Island introduce us to environmental entertainer Dina Kageler. Ms. Kageler, herself a parent, uses music to teach students at Volcano Arts & Sciences about the natural wonders of the Volcano district of the Big Island. She also mounts an annual school musical that celebrates the flora, fauna and natural beauty of the area.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Saint Francis School in the Manoa district of O‘ahu feature a young entrepreneur who dedicated his innovative ice cream parlor –Lucy’s Lab Creamery – to his late “tiger mom” mother.

 

Students at Waiakea Intermediate School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island show viewers how to beat the heat by creating their very own traditional Japanese uchiwa fan.

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, explore how well- suited the soil at Maui’s HC&S sugar plantation will be for diversified agriculture once sugar production shuts down for good.

 

Students at Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu show us what it’s like to be home-schooled.

 

And students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu introduce us to a football coach who acts as a surrogate father to his players.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 17 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 18 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Top Story: H.P. Baldwin High School – HC&S (Hawaii Commercial and Sugar) employees

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui present poignant portraits of two long-time HC&S (Hawaii Commercial and Sugar) employees: machinist Wes Bissen and millwright Koa Martin. HC&S is the last remaining sugar mill in Hawaii and will be closing at the end of 2016. The mill opened 144 years ago. The closure will result in 675 employees losing their jobs.

 

Martin’s father and grandfather worked for HC&S before him. Bissen started working at HC&S in 1981. His father was also a machinist for the company. The two reflect on their careers at HC&S and their families’ histories with the company. They also discuss the state funds being allotted to help the laid off workers through the transition. Says Bissen, “You know, it’s sad that they’re going to close, but we’re all big boys. We’ve got to focus on how it’s going to affect everybody and just try to build a better life from here on.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on Oahu tell the story of their annual basketball event for Best Buddies, a program that helps to integrate students with intellectual and mental disabilities into the social fabric of the school.

 

Students from Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oahu take us behind the scenes of their school’s nerve center – the front office.

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a surfer- turned-chef who runs the popular Like Poke food truck on Maui.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai tell us about a community organization that feels they have one solution to Kauai’s feral cat problem.

 

And students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui show us how a married couple is living out its golden years at a Maui senior day care center.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Mililani High School in Central Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 2 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

Hawaii public schools score big in national TV competition

Press Release Header

 

HONOLULU – Hawaii schools walked away with 34 awards at the 13th annual Student Television Network (STN) competition in Atlanta, held March 10-13. Click here to view the complete list of Hawaii results, lower on this page.

 

Close to 3,000 middle and high school students from across the U.S. gathered to compete in on-site, time-restricted contests in video journalism, television production, filmmaking, music videos, commercials, and public service announcements. All of the Hawaii schools that attended the competition are public schools and participants in PBS Hawaii’s HIKI NŌ student news network.

 

Last year, Hawaii schools brought home 28 awards from the STN Convention. As in the last few STN competitions, the number of awards won by Hawaii schools was notably high in comparison to states with larger populations, such as California, Florida, and Texas.

 

“Without a doubt, the stellar performance by Hawaii schools at STN is due to the work our schools have done with HIKI NŌ and PBS Hawaii,” said Kevin Matsunaga, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School media teacher and STN regional board member. “Our students have developed solid technical and storytelling skills through our workshops throughout the year. Our Hawaii media teachers have worked tirelessly, as well, and the outstanding work their students have done at these competitions is proof that HIKI NŌ is making a huge difference in the lives of our students.”

 

The Hawaii school awards count was led by Maui Waena Intermediate’s nine, followed by Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School with eight, and Waianae High School with six. There were a number of first-time awardees among the Hawaii schools, including Kapolei High School, Waipahu Intermediate School, and Ewa Makai Middle School.

 

Ewa Makai media teacher Ethan Toyota said his students were “in shock” when they won two honorable mention awards in the commercial and public service announcement categories. “We wouldn’t be here without all the training and help HIKI NŌ has contributed in getting us off the ground,” he said.

 

“HIKI NŌ offers students the ideal preparation for this national competition and it also readies them for different professional paths — by teaching them to work their way through challenges and deliver quality work on tight deadlines,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO.

 

“Congratulations to all of the students that participated in this rigorous competition in which they represented their schools and our state well,” said Kathryn Matayoshi, Hawaii Department of Education Superintendent. “PBS Hawaii is a valued partner for providing opportunities like HIKI NŌ. The teamwork and use of technology needed to create these quality productions align with the Department’s mission to help our students connect with their communities and be lifelong learners.”

 

 

2016 Student Television Network – Hawaii Winners:

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL CONVENTION RE-CAP 

2nd Place – CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE (Maui)

 

HIGH SCHOOL CONVENTION RE-CAP 

Honorable Mention — WAIANAE HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL SPOT FEATURE 

2nd Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

 

LEAD STORY 

3rd Place — MOANALUA HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MAN ON THE STREET

3rd Place — MOANALUA HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL MOVIE TRAILER 

Honorable Mention — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL NAT. PACKAGE
(No announcer, only interview soundbites and natural sound)

1st Place — WAIANAE INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

2nd Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

Honorable Mention—MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL COMMERCIAL 

1st Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — EWA MAKAI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL PSA (Public Service Announcement) 

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — EWA MAKAI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL BREAKING NEWS

1st Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL ANCHOR TEAM

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL MUSIC VIDEO

1st Place — WAIPAHU INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

2nd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

 

HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC VIDEO

Honorable Mention — KAPOLEI HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

CRAZY 8’s
(In these categories, schools had eight hours to complete an eight-minute show)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL BROADCAST NEWS MAGAZINE

Honorable Mention — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

 

TV SCRIPTED SITCOM PILOT

Honorable Mention — WAIAKEA HIGH SCHOOL (Hawaii Island)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL SHORT FILM—FICTION

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

2nd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

3rd Place — WAIPAHU INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

STN FILM EXCELLENCE AWARDS (entries submitted prior to the competition)

 

BEST FILM – LIVE ACTION

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST FILM – ANIMATED

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST MONTHLY NEWS BROADCAST – SOUTH PACIFIC REGION

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST SOUND DESIGN – ORIGINAL SCORE & MUSIC

Moanalua High School (Oahu)

 

BEST WRITING

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST DIRECTING

Moanalua High School (Oahu)

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

Contact: Donalyn Dela Cruz, Hawaii State Department of Education
Email: Donalyn_Dela_Cruz@hawaiidoe.org
Phone: 808.586.3232

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

HIKI NŌ
Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai tell the story of Joe Young, a retired police officer who is also a prostate cancer survivor. Mr. Young decided against traditional medical treatments, such as surgery and chemotherapy. Instead he changed his lifestyle and focused on doing things that make him happy. Through this approach and with the support of his family, Mr. Young is now cancer free.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island profile a driver’s education instructor who teaches teens the rules of the road to help prevent accidents and save lives.

 

Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Manny Mattos, a retired HPD officer who collects traditional Hawaiian war weapons and educates the public on conservation efforts to preserve the indigenous woods the weapons are made from.

 

From the HIKI NŌ archives: Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha on Kauai present a story about how a traditional Hawaiian hale (house) is built.

 

Students from Maui High School profile Chantal Sandoval, a deaf Junior Varsity cheerleader who explains that the biggest challenge for her is the social stigma attached to being deaf.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School in Keaau on the Big Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 26 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 27 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Ewa Makai Middle School

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of Bristyl Dempsey, a thirteen-year-old girl who suffers from Tourette Syndrome – a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics. Bristyl’s symptoms surfaced when she was in intermediate school. Her tics made her the target of teasing and ridicule by fellow students, and one teacher mistook Bristyl’s involuntary tics as intentional misbehaving in class. Given the pressures this caused, Bristyl’s mother thought it would be better for her daughter to be home-schooled. During her year of home-schooling, Bristyl’s symptoms improved with therapies such as meditation, and her self- esteem increased. She entered Maui High School this year as a freshman and looks forward to a mainstream school experience with her friends and extra-curricular activities such as cheerleading.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu profile ukulele phenom Jody Kamisato, who chose the high-risk/high-reward route of opening his own music school over the option of being an employee of someone else’s school.

 

Students from Wheeler Middle School in Central Oahu offer tips on how to prepare an emergency kit in the event of a hurricane.

 

Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to The Canvas, a student-designed, student-run work/play space in Kalihi.

 

Continuing with the theme of students creating their own venues of expression, we take a look at a past HIKI NŌ story from Maui Waena Intermediate School about a high school student who created a youth version of TEDex.

 

Students from Kapolei High School in Central Oahu tell the story of a youth volunteer at the no-kill animal shelter OSPCA (Oahu Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals).

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Ewa Makai Middle School.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 12 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 13 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Farrington High School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Farrington High School on Oahu.

 
Top Story:
Students from Iolani School on Oahu tell the story of a young Iolani graduate who, despite becoming a quadruple amputee due to a devastating disease, continues to live life with grace and appreciation. She visits her alma mater, sharing her inspiring message of perseverance.

 
Also Featured:
Students at Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui explore the controversy surrounding  the construction of a new Central Maui Sports Complex; students at Kainalu Elementary School on Oahu profile a Kailua woman who shares the art of ribbon-lei-making with people from around the world; students at Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu show how science and spiritualism are coming to the aid of a historic Waikiki icon – the Moana Hotel’s majestic banyan tree; students at Lahainaluna High School on Maui share the story of a Lahaina woman who proudly maintains her Hawaiian heritage through pa’u riding; students at Waiakea High School on Hawaii Island spotlight a locally owned surf company in Kapaa, Kauai that gives back by supporting the community’s sports teams.

 

 

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