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NOVA
Ultimate Cruise Ship

 

Weighing 54,000 gross tons and stretching over two football fields, the Seven Seas Explorer is no ordinary boat. NOVA follows a pioneering team of ship builders as they embark on what is advertised to be a milestone in maritime engineering.

 

NOVA
Secrets of Noah’s Ark

 

A 3,700-year-old inscribed clay tablet reveals a surprising version of the Biblical flood story, complete with how-to instructions for assembling an ark. Following the directions, expert boat builders assemble and launch a massive reed boat.

 

NATURE
Soul of the Elephant

 

Ironically, every dead elephant with its ivory intact is a reason to celebrate. It means an elephant died of natural causes, not bullets, snares or poison, and a soul was allowed to be celebrated and mourned by its herd. Award-winning filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert start with the remains of two bull elephants and through a series of key flashbacks, look at the lives they would have led, the dramas they may have seen, their great migrations for water with their families, and their encounters with lions and hyenas. This film, shot over two years, is an intimate look at elephants through the lens of two great storytellers of natural history.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Honolulu Zoo: A Fall from Grace

 

The Honolulu Zoo lost its accreditation after the Association of Zoos and Aquariums determined that the zoo receives inadequate funding from the City and community partners, and suffers from inconsistent leadership and political wrangling. City leaders vow to turn things around. The question is: How? On INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I, we’ll examine with Zoo Director Baird Fleming and other animal advocates with differing perspectives.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

NATURE
Raising the Dinosaur Giant

 

Have scientists discovered the biggest animal to have ever walked the planet? Deep in a South American desert, a giant is being awakened after 101 million years of sleep. Paleontologists have discovered a giant femur – the largest dinosaur bone that has ever been unearthed. Another 200 bones from the same species have also been discovered. Sir David Attenborough guides us through the remarkable journey of waking the giant as it happens – connecting the dots, translating the paleo jargon and explaining the revelations using living examples, other dinosaur discoveries and CGI visuals.

 

NATURE
Big Birds Can’t Fly

 

This is the unique story of flightless birds. They say a bird is three things – feathers, flight and song. But what happens when you’re a bird who can’t fly, who can’t sing, and whose feathers are closer to fluff? Flightless birds include ostriches, emus, rheas, cassowaries and kiwis, and, interestingly, all have evolved independent of each other on different continents. Research has shown that some of these big birds at one time could fly, but once the dinosaurs were wiped out, these same birds no longer needed to take flight from their enemies. As they began to explore a world rich with food and free from predators, they grew fat, and their legs grew long and strong – until the day they discovered that although they had become good at walking, they’d also become too heavy to fly.

 

NOVA
Bigger Than T.rex

 

Almost a century ago, paleontologists found the first tantalizing hints of a monster even bigger than Tyrannosaurus rex, perhaps the largest predator ever to walk the Earth: spectacular fossil bones from a dinosaur dubbed Spinosaurus. But the fossils were completely destroyed during a World War II Allied bombing raid, leaving only drawings, lots of questions, and a mystery: What was Spinosaurus? Now, the discovery of new bones in a Moroccan cliff face is reopening the investigation into this epic beast. What did it feed on and how? Why did it grow so big?

 

We follow the paleontologists who are reconstructing this terrifying carnivore piece by piece, revealing a 53-foot-long behemoth with a huge dorsal sail, enormous, scimitar-like claws and massive jaws, tapered toward the front like a crocodile, hosting an army of teeth. Bringing together experts in paleontology, geology, climatology and paleobotany, this NOVA/National Geographic special brings to life the lost world over which Spinosaurus reigned more than 65 million years ago.