Konawaena High School

HIKI NŌ
Episode #819

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu present a story on the Hawai‘i-themed artwork engraved on the columns of O‘ahu’s rail project. The column art was designed by local architect Daniel Kanekuni and, according to HART spokesperson Bill Brennan, adds a sense of place and local identity to the rail project. Rail proponents and opponents alike feel that the column artwork is a good thing. However, some rail opponents, such as UH Professor of Civil Engineering Panos Prevedouros, feel that the real eye-sore will be the elevated rail stations. Says Prevedouros, “How much lipstick do they think they can put on that pig?”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School show how a Kahului family’s mochi- pounding tradition continues, despite the recent loss of the family matriarch who had been the heart of the event.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Technology Academy in Leeward O‘ahu show us the proper way to pack a military care package.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island profile a Konawaena graduate who went on to form the internationally renowned heavy metal reggae band Pepper.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a lesbian couple at their school who work to spread the joy of diversity and the message of tolerance for those who are different.

 

–Students from Maui High School profile a star athlete who had to sit out the football season because of a heart condition but continued to inspire his teammates by volunteering as an assistant coach.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 27, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, May 28, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #815 – Best Overall Story, High School Division

 

The final in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for Best Overall Story, High School Division:

 

–“Life After Sugar” by H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui;

 

–“Iloreta Brothers” by Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i;

 

–“A Love Story” by Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island;

 

–“Deaf Cheerleader” by Maui High School on Maui;

 

–“Without Home” by Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu.

 

This episode is hosted by Lara Sato from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Zaccai Ceruti from James Campbell High School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, March 11 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, March 12 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS RESULTS

HIKI NŌ Awards Nominees March 23, 2017

 

The 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards

PBS Hawai‘i recognizes exceptional storytelling skills of middle and high school students throughout our Islands who participate in HIKI NŌ, our statewide digital learning initiative and student news program.

 

The nominees were chosen from HIKI NŌ shows that aired during the 2015-2016 school year and the Fall Semester of this current school year. You can view each nominated piece by clicking on its name in the list below. (You can also watch the nominated projects, by category, Thursdays at 7:30 pm, Saturdays at noon, and Sundays at 3:00 pm on PBS Hawai’i.)

 

This year’s Gold, Silver and Bronze winners are indicated below. Winning stories, as well as highlights from this year’s awards celebrations, will be featured on our two-part 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards Show, Thursday, March 23 and Thursday, March 30 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i. Congratulations to all nominees and winners – and mahalo to all the students, teachers and mentors who help make HIKI NŌ a success in our public, private and charter schools throughout Hawai‘i.

 


 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Homeschooled Student” SILVER

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Moses Hamilton” GOLD

Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu) – “Laurie Rubin” BRONZE

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Joe Young”

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “John Plunkett”

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Bipolar Artist”

James Campbell High School (O‘ahu) – “Miracle Baby” GOLD

Maui High School (Maui) – “Marc Unites”

Mid-Pacific (O‘ahu) – “Ukulele Hale” BRONZE

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Living With Pain” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Front Office”

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “K-9 Search & Rescue” GOLD

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui) – “Feed My Sheep”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Love Laundry” BRONZE

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui) – “Airconditioning”

Mililani Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Mokauea Island” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kapolei High School (O‘ahu) – “Best Buddies Basketball”

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Biomass” GOLD

Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy PCS (Hawai‘i Island) – “Opelu Fishing” BRONZE

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “Text Neck” SILVER

Saint Francis School (O‘ahu) – “Lucy’s Lab Creamery”

Waiakea High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Cosplay”

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Dog Wheelchair”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Firefighter”

Ka Waihona o Ka Naʻauao PCS (O‘ahu) – “Steel Guitar” BRONZE

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “Haleakala Mules” SILVER

Wai‘anae Intermediate School (O‘ahu)– “A Home For Larenzo” GOLD

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Life After Sugar”

Kapa‘a High School (Kaua‘i) – “Iloreta Brothers” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “A Love Story”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Deaf Cheerleader” BRONZE

Waiʻanae High School (O‘ahu) – “Without Home” SILVER

 

BEST FRANCHISE PIECE

Hana K-12 (Maui) – “Ti Leaf Print”

Kalani High School (O‘ahu) – “Thaumatrope”

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “10 Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone” GOLD

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Hurricane Protection” BRONZE

Moloka‘i High School (Moloka‘i) “Text-A-Tip

Pacific Buddhist Academy (O‘ahu) – “Offering Incense” SILVER

 

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY & EDITING

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Junior Lifeguard”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Tourette” GOLD

Moanalua High School (O‘ahu) – “Equestrian” SILVER

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “IUCN”

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Parental Guidance Required” BRONZE

 

BEST FACTOID

Hana K-12  (Maui) – “School History”

Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy (Hawai‘i Island) – “Solar Trees” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Wildcats”

Mililani High School (O‘ahu) – “Red Dirt” BRONZE

President William McKinley High School (O‘ahu) – “School Spirit” SILVER

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #806

 

TOP STORY
Adults today bemoan the fact that members of the younger generation spend all of their waking hours on their smartphones. Young people from that very generation – students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i will surprise viewers with their video primer on “Ten Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone.” The activities they feature include making new friends, volunteering for a worthy cause, learning a new hobby – all things that take you away from the virtual world of your screen and into engaging with people face-to-face in the actual, physical world.

 

ALSO FEATURED
Students at Kapolei High School in Central O‘ahu tell the story of a school fun-run that was renamed to honor a teacher’s daughter who passed away from cancer.

 

Students at Konawaena High School in the Kona district of Hawai‘i Island tell the poignant story of a same-sex married couple whose love lives on after the tragic death of one partner.

 

Students from Radford High School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu tell the story of a football coach who makes life lessons a priority over winning.

 

Students from Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy in South Kona show us how to make unique t-shirt prints out of recycled materials.

 

And students from Kainalu Elementary School on the Windward side of O‘ahu show us how to use earthworms to make a nutrient-rich type of fertilizer.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Episode #801

 

TOP STORY
Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu report on a phenomenon known to orthopedists as “text neck.” According to experts, bending one’s head down to text and perform other functions on one’s smartphone and other portable devices can lead to a deformity of the spine resulting in hunchback at the base of the neck and upper back. This story raises awareness of this growing problem and explores ways of diagnosing and preventing the condition.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui tell the story of a teacher who turned to her church to help cool down her 90-plus degree classroom.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i profile one of the state’s top junior lifeguards, who happens to be a thirteen-year-old-girl.

 

–Students from Waiakea Intermediate School on Hawai‘i Island show us the proper procedures for “hands only” CPR.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Kona side of Hawai‘i Island profile their recently retired, legendary athletic director, who has inspired many students over the past few decades.

 

–And students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to a photography teacher who passionately believes that photography is the universal language.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 1 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 2 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Imi na’auao

 

This episode is the fourth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘imi na’auao, or enlightenment and wisdom. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. They feature Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people, learning culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Kamehameha School Kapalama (Oahu): This story shows how exploring a tumultuous and traumatic episode from the past can enlighten the next generation on how not to repeat history. Here students at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama study and discuss the Bishop Estate “Broken Trust” controversy that led to positive change and transparency in the trust that manages their schools.

 

Wheeler Middle School (Oahu): Enlightenment and wisdom can come from seeing beyond stereotypes and getting to know people for who they really are. In this story from Wheeler Middle School, a military dependent and a local boy become friends, despite each of their pre-conceived ideas of what the other was “supposed” to be like.

 

Kawananakoa Middle School (Oahu): Veteran boxing coach Joel Kim bestows gems of wisdom onto his young boxing protégés. If experience is the best teacher, then Kim has earned a PhD from the School of Hard Knocks.

 

Konawaena High School (Hawaii Island): Live theatre can be a great tool of enlightenment. Such was the case when a stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank enlightened students on the Kona Coast of Hawaii Island about the persecution of Jews in World War II Europe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sometimes the best way to learn about something we know little of is to witness it first-hand. Few middle schoolers have had the experience of knowing someone who is transitioning from the gender they were born with into that of the opposite sex. But when a student at Waianae Intermediate School decided to transition from a boy to a girl, fellow students, teachers, and school administrators became part of a unique process of learning and enlightenment.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): Some teenagers are wise beyond their years. Roosevelt High School student Satoshi Sugiyama learned through observation that in this age of the internet and social media, the most important connections still happen face-to-face…especially over a cup of freshly brewed coffee.

 

This episode is hosted by Kua O Ka La Public Charter School on Hawaii Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 7 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaian Value: Ho’omau

 

This is the premiere episode of HIKI NŌ Season 7, and the first in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value.

 

The Hawaiian value for this show is ho’omau, which means to persevere, perpetuate, or continue.

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui High School, who follow former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia is used to contesting opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan. But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere against an enemy she is not familiar with: uncertainty.

 

Also featured are these student stories:
Roosevelt High School on Oahu tell the story of Papahana Kuaola, a non-profit organization in Kaneohe that contributes to the preservation of Hawaiian culture through the preservation of land and native plants, public awareness and the use of chant.

 

Kapolei High School on Oahu profile Kapolei football player Papu Uti, who lost his leg from a debilitating accident but expects to return to playing football with a prosthetic leg.

 

Connections Public Charter School on Hawaii Island feature world-renowned slack key guitarist Cyril Pahinui, who continues his father Gabby Pahinui’s legacy by using his father’s teaching methods at workshops.

 

Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauai tells the story of teacher Hope Kaimi Strickland who, raised on Niihau Island, honors her deceased husband’s wishes for their children to learn her Hawaiian culture and Niihau Hawaiian dialect.

 

Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu feature fellow student Crystal Cebedo. Crystal deals with the uncontrollable aspects of her life, such as her mother’s cancer, by keeping busy and meeting life’s challenges.

 

Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island shows us how the Kona Historical Society built an authentic, old-fashioned Portuguese oven for baking bread as a part of its efforts to recreate the traditions of old Kona.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Radford High School on Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 6 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Aug. 7 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NO
Focus on Local Business

 

This episode, hosted by HIKI NŌ graduate Shisa Kahaunaele, looks back at past stories about Hawaii-based, locally-run businesses:

 

–A story from Maui High School about a grocer in Happy Valley, Maui who has figured out how to use the influx of big-box retailers to his advantage.

 

–A profile from Waimea High School on Kauai about a successful t-shirt artist who grew up in Waimea so poor that all he could afford to wear were t-shirts.

 

— A history by Seabury Hall Middle School about the iconic, family-run Komoda Bakery in Makawao.

 

— A story from Roosevelt High School on Oahu about a café that sells slow-drip coffee but whose real draw is the unrushed, face-to-face interaction between its customers.

 

— A study from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle of Maui Soda & Ice Works and the strong set of family values that has made that business a success.

 

— A story from Kalaheo High School on Oahu about a chocolate manufacturer in Kailua whose product bears the name of a valley in Honolulu (Manoa Chocolates) and that uses cacao beans from all over the world.

 

— A profile from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island about a family-founded -and-run hotel that is nearing a hundred years of age and whose success can be attributed to the allure of nostalgia and a great pork chop.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 16 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 17 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Kua O ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy: Traditional Opelu Fishing

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kua O ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy Public Charter School on Hawaii Island tell the story of traditional opelu fishing in the remote South Kona fishing village of Milolii. For many Milolii residents, opelu fishing is more than a tradition – it is a means of survival. Families sell their catch as their main source of income and are trying to pass the practice down to their children so that the tradition and income source can continue.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a local church group that provides free laundry services for the needy.

 

Students from Wheeler Middle School in Central Oahu profile a recently arrived military dependent who has fallen in love with the hula.

 

Continuing the theme of outsiders embracing Hawaiian culture, a mainland transplant becomes the Hawaiian Studies teacher at St. Andrew’s Priory in Honolulu (a story from the HIKI NŌ archives).

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island show us how they are inspired by a Hilo physician who, as a high school student, was the least likely person to ever become a doctor.

 

And from Mililani Middle School in Central Oahu, a special needs language arts teacher expresses himself by painting large, colorful portraits.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 11 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 12 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai tell the story of Joe Young, a retired police officer who is also a prostate cancer survivor. Mr. Young decided against traditional medical treatments, such as surgery and chemotherapy. Instead he changed his lifestyle and focused on doing things that make him happy. Through this approach and with the support of his family, Mr. Young is now cancer free.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island profile a driver’s education instructor who teaches teens the rules of the road to help prevent accidents and save lives.

 

Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Manny Mattos, a retired HPD officer who collects traditional Hawaiian war weapons and educates the public on conservation efforts to preserve the indigenous woods the weapons are made from.

 

From the HIKI NŌ archives: Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha on Kauai present a story about how a traditional Hawaiian hale (house) is built.

 

Students from Maui High School profile Chantal Sandoval, a deaf Junior Varsity cheerleader who explains that the biggest challenge for her is the social stigma attached to being deaf.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School in Keaau on the Big Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 26 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 27 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



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