knowledge

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
ʻike – Knowledge is Everywhere

 

In his documentary, ‘ike: Knowledge is Everywhere, filmmaker Matthew Nagato could have pointed out everything that’s wrong with public education in Hawai‘i. Instead, Nagato set out to accent the positive, by sharing stories of trailblazers in Hawai‘i who are creating and implementing innovative programs to improve public education. “We want people to strive, to get to places, to do things, and not just sit around and accept the status quo, simply because it’s difficult. I choose the route that gives people the hope, the opportunity and the belief,” Nagato stated in an interview.

 

Immediately following the film, Insights on PBS Hawai‘i will sit down with filmmaker Nagato; Candy Suiso, who created Searider Productions at Wai‘anae High School; Zachery Grace from Matt Levi’s Lawakua Kajukenbo martial arts club; and Waipahu High School Principal Keith Hayashi, one of the innovators featured in the film.

 

NATURE
Touching the Wild

 

Joe Hutto has dedicated seven years of his life to “becoming” a wild mule deer. Ordinarily, the deer herd would run from any human, but these keenly intelligent animals come to regard this stranger as one of their own. As he crosses the species divide, Hutto taps into a new understanding of these elusive animals. His joy in his new family is infectious, but this human predator also learns to see the world from the point of view of prey.

 

Taking Our Cue from the Kukui Tree

 

Architect Sheryl Seaman created these kukui designs for our NEW HOME. The designs are featured on PBS Hawaii's new t-shirt.

Architect Sheryl Seaman created these kukui designs for our NEW HOME. The designs are featured on PBS Hawai‘i’s new t-shirt

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiIf you pluck just one nut from a kukui tree, you will have oil to illuminate the dark for more than three minutes. That’s one of many reasons that Polynesian voyagers brought kukui saplings aboard their canoes to this new land more than 1,500 years ago. Almost every part of the kukui tree was useful in the settlers’ everyday lives. Today the kukui tree is our state tree.

 

Our PBS Hawai‘i team looks forward to seeing the kukui represented on our soon-to-be NEW HOME on Nimitz Highway. Group 70 International architect Sheryl Seaman has designed an artful metal screen to enfold the building, depicting historically important Hawaiian plants of the area.

 

The kukui is a particular favorite of ours because it does what we try to do in our own way – be useful every day and illuminate.

 

At last month’s meeting of PBS Hawai‘i’s statewide Community Advisory Board, Maui member Kainoa Horcajo called out a recent illuminating Insights on PBS Hawai‘i program. Three individuals who’ve been diagnosed with stage-four (advanced) cancer spoke candidly on live television about what they think about and what their lives are like as they face the prospect of death.

 

“What is more shrouded in darkness and needs more illumination than death?” Horcajo asked. “(Hawaiian) sovereignty and death – those are the elephants in the room in Hawai‘i.”

 

Lei Kihoi Dunne of Hawai‘i Island spoke of activists in her rural county. A Kona attorney, Dunne said, “They need to know how to access and participate and properly conduct themselves in advocacy that truly advances their cause.”

 

“Right now, people feel outside the process,” Dunne said. “They can be empowered to make a difference and bring, for example, a contested-case hearing to protect natural resources and culture.”

 

Horcajo agreed that knowledge of procedure counts: “Knocking on the wrong doors engenders apathy – a feeling that nothing will change…You don’t go to a shave ice store to buy a loco moco.”

 

Oahu member Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui said that civics education is important for good citizenship: “It’s wayfinding.”

 

Long ago, Polynesian voyagers brought the means to create light. The kukui tree design on our new building will be a constant reminder to shed light on things that matter.

 

Aloha a hui hou,

Leslie signature

 

The Human Face of Big Data

 

During the first day of a baby’s life the amount of data generated by humanity is equivalent to 70 times the information contained in the Library of Congress. What will it mean to live in a world where every moment, from birth to death, is digitally chronicled and preserved in vast cloud-based databases, forever? This film captures the promise and potential peril of the extraordinary knowledge revolution.

 

Can a Film Inspire Change when Change is Tough?

Can a Film Inspire Change when Change is Tough?

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiCan storytelling profoundly touch lives? Here at PBS Hawaii, the answer is a resounding yes. Belief in the power of storytelling to educate, and a conviction that education can transform perspectives and even lives, are the underpinnings of everything we do here.

 

Now here comes an independent Hawaii film that is a great example of storytelling meant to inspire and motivate – with the goal of improving public education. Matthew Nagato’s film, ʻike – Knowledge is Everywhere, shares intimate stories of efforts that are working – of real students, educators and advocates in Hawaii who are listening to community needs, who aren’t letting commonplace conflicts over resources and policy stop them, and who are collectively taking action.

 

“I think people are hungry for this type of storytelling… It’s hopeful and positive. It’s about what’s going right, not what’s going wrong,” Nagato says. His previous film, ola – Health is Everything, about another complex subject, health care in Hawaii, was well-received and also featured individuals making a collective difference.

 

On Thursday, September 24, at 8:00 pm, we are proud to present the statewide television debut of ʻike (which means knowledge). Stay with us for a live local discussion afterward, on Insights on PBS Hawaii, at a special time, 9:10 pm.

 

Many people already have seen this film in groups large and small. That’s because the filmmaker has taken it out for about 50 free community screenings on different islands, and he has invited attendees to express their thoughts.

 

Ken Hiraki, President of the Public Schools Foundation of Hawaii, has eagerly gone to seven community screenings and each time, he told me, the film has moved him to tears. And it has galvanized him to work with his organization to establish a Summer Scholars program at Waipahu High School.

 

Says film director Nagato: “I do see people take action as a result of a screening. They’ve said, ‘Let’s put down our shields and reach out to someone to work with, to partner with…and let’s develop something.’”

 

He believes firmly that “small, incremental changes overtake the problem at some point.”

 

We hope that you’re able to watch Matthew Nagato’s humbly provocative film on PBS Hawaii on September 24. He’ll be on hand for the live discussion to follow. We invite you to get involved by calling in, tweeting, or emailing your comments and questions.

 

A hui hou (until next time),

Leslie signature

 

 

NOVA
Nuclear Meltdown Disaster

 

Four years ago, a devastating earthquake and tsunami triggered a disastrous meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. But at the same time, just seven miles away, the heroic efforts of plant operators under the leadership of Naohiro Masuda saved a second plant, Fukushima Daini. Now Masuda faces the daunting challenge of cleaning up Daiichi, where radioactive groundwater leaks into the Pacific every day, and three melted cores remain steaming hot and lethally unapproachable. Now, with unprecedented access, NOVA reveals the little-known story of how Masuda and his team averted disaster at Daini and how workers are struggling to clean up the mess at Daiichi. With billions of dollars and the future of the nuclear energy industry on the line, can Japan ever recover from disaster? The world is watching the fight for Fukushima.

 

NOVA
Chasing Pluto

 

Join NOVA for New Horizon’s historic flyby of Pluto, the culmination of the spacecraft’s nine-year, three-billion-mile journey to reveal the first-ever detailed images of this strange, icy world at the very edge of our solar system.

 

NOVA

This is the NOVA programs page. You will find recently aired and past NOVA programs here.

RICK STEVES’ EUROPE
The Netherlands Beyond Amsterdam


America’s leading authority on European travel, returns to transport viewers to bustling cities, quaint villages and picturesque countrysides. Each episode contains Rick’s valuable insights on art, culture and history, and his practical, experience-enhancing travel advice.

The Netherlands Beyond Amsterdam
By train, bike and boat, Rick visits the top Dutch sights outside of Amsterdam: from Haarlem to Rotterdam, and from Delft to the Zuiderzee. Along the way, he enjoys charming towns, cheese markets, mighty dikes and windmills old and new.