Kealakehe High School

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Ike pono

This episode is the fifth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘ike pono, which means to know what is right. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui Waena Intermediate School who feature Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often in trouble with the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. His motivation for opening the business was not to make money, but to provide his family and community with healthy snacks, to employ people who need a helping hand (like he did), and to encourage his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods. “I went from someone who wasn’t doing Maui any good to someone who is making a difference,” says Cousins.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sosefina Matautia, once a self-professed bully at Waianae Intermediate School, decided to do the right thing and change her ways. While becoming a kinder, better person benefitted those around her, Sosefina was motivated to change because of her own dreams of someday becoming a doctor.

 

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui): Led by math teacher Debi Davis, Seabury Hall Middle School students do the right thing for the less fortunate by weaving colorful yarn hats that are distributed around the world to help brighten the lives of underprivileged children.

 

Kealakehe High School (Hawaii Island): Students and other community members in Kona do the right thing by banding together to build Habitat for Humanity homes for families on the Hawaiian Homes wait list.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): Sometimes doing what you know is right requires great sacrifice. Sometimes doing what is right means doing less for yourself. Such is the case with Waianae High School student Daisy Agae, whose grades suffer because she has to take care of her two younger brothers, one of whom is a special needs child born with debilitating medical conditions.

 

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (Hawaii Island): Hawaii Island resident William ”Black” Abraham was headed down the wrong path as a young adult, until he decided to do the right thing and dedicate his life to saving lives. He did so by becoming an Ocean Safety Officer at Hapuna Beach and is now inspiring the next generation of lifesavers through his Junior Lifeguard training program.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui High (Maui): An East Maui couple do the right thing by taking in and caring for animals with debilitating and life-threatening illnesses. As a result, their home has become the East Maui Animal Refuge, more affectionately known as the Boo-Boo Zoo. This episode is hosted by Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Kapaa Middle School on Kauai

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Leilehua High School on Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of Shardenei Luning, who has been competing in beauty pageants since the age of four and now shines as the only female member of the Waianae Tigers Junior Midgets Pop Warner football team. When confronted by a bully on the team, Shardenei learns to hold her own with both grace and grit.

 

Also Featured:
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui profile senior McKayla Wandell, who uses her story of growing up with a methamphetamine-addicted father to teach others about the dangers of the drug; students from King Intermediate School on Oahu feature how seventh-grader Aisha Yamamoto fell in love with being a disc jockey and now spins at all the school dances; students from Punahou School on Oahu highlight how freshman Kahi Bisho is combining his love of the ocean and photography into an artistic venture; students from Kealakehe High School in Kona profile Cathy Lewis, who is the longest active Red Cross volunteer in Hawaii County and was recognized as Volunteer of the Year in Hawaii County; and students from Waimea High School on Kauai turn the spotlight on the reopening of historic Waimea Theater, which has found new life as a community gathering place.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Leilehua High School on Oahu

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Leilehua High School on Oahu.

Top Story:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of Shardenei Luning, who has been competing in beauty pageants since the age of four and now shines as the only female member of the Waianae Tigers Junior Midgets Pop Warner football team. When confronted by a bully on the team, Shardenei learns to hold her own with both grace and grit.

Also Featured:
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui profile senior McKayla Wandell, who uses her story of growing up with a methamphetamine-addicted father to teach others about the dangers of the drug; students from King Intermediate School on Oahu feature how seventh-grader Aisha Yamamoto fell in love with being a disc jockey and now spins at all the school dances; students from Punahou School on Oahu highlight how freshman Kahi Bisho is combining his love of the ocean and photography into an artistic venture; students from Kealakehe High School in Kona profile Cathy Lewis, who is the longest active Red Cross volunteer in Hawaii County and was recognized as Volunteer of the Year in Hawaii County; and students from Waimea High School on Kauai turn the spotlight on the reopening of historic Waimea Theater, which has found new life as a community gathering place.

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Punahou School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Punahou School on Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School on Oahu tell the story of a second-generation Waianae farmer who brings people together with a traditional Hawaiian paina (party) that he hosts at his home each fall. Family, friends and community members gather to prepare the meal and to share in giving thanks.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Waipahu Intermediate School on Oahu show how children at the oldest elementary school in Waipahu complex are benefitting from the addition of new classrooms; students at Kealakehe High School on Hawaii Island spotlight the school’s Triathlon Club, which trains students in the multi-discipline sport and inspires others to get active; Students at Kalani High School on Oahu demonstrate a simple way to get started on Instagram students at Waialua High & Intermediate School on Oahu showcase how local artisans have transformed a North Shore art gallery into a work of art; students at Mililani Middle School on Oahu follow the trail of invasive little fire ants in their community; and students at Waianae High School on Oahu tell the story of a City and County lifeguard and his quest to save a program that teaches young people how to become lifesavers in the ocean.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Island School, Lihue

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Island School from Lihue, Kauai.

 

Top Story:
Kealakehe High School on Hawaii Island presents a story about students from their school and from Iolani School on Oahu who were selected to participate in a once-in-a-lifetime science project that will send NASA’s dust shield technology to the moon. These robotics students, called MoonRIDERS (Research Investigating Dust Expulsion & Removal Systems), will work with the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems in hands-on experiments testing the capabilities of NASA’s EDS (Electrodynamic Dust Shield). Students will build a mock up lunar lander spacecraft, fabricate the actual flight frame for the mission, mount the EDS on it, install a camera and design a lunar re-duster, then test the entire system on the lower slopes of Mauna Kea to see how well it will remove dust off of the camera lens.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai visit Hanapepe Nights, a popular art, music and food festival in Kauai’s biggest little town. Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of a husband and wife who left their careers as mechanical engineers to farm the very colorful, exotic dragon fruit on Maui. Students from McKinley High School on Oahu profile their school’s cross-country team captain, Hidemasa Vincent Mitsui, who was deemed ineligible to compete during his senior year because he had to repeat the 9th grade when he moved from Japan to Hawaii (OIA rules state that a 5th year student is ineligible to participate in high school sports). Even though he was not able to compete, Vincent inspired his teammates to do their very best and was eventually reinstated when his coach and athletic director appealed to the OIA.

 

Students at Iolani School on Oahu take us behind the scenes with the Iolani Hackers, a group of students and faculty members who create elaborate visual pranks meant to surprise and delight people on campus. Students at Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Isabel Villanueva, the state air riflery champion who excels at the sport despite the fact that she lives with a rare medical condition – linear scleroderma – which causes her physical pain while participating in the sport. Students at Wheeler Middle School on Oahu show us how to stay safe on the internet by using proper social media etiquette and guidelines.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 2 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.