Kapaa High School

HIKI NŌ
Episode #815 – Best Overall Story, High School Division

 

The final in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for Best Overall Story, High School Division:

 

–“Life After Sugar” by H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui;

 

–“Iloreta Brothers” by Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i;

 

–“A Love Story” by Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island;

 

–“Deaf Cheerleader” by Maui High School on Maui;

 

–“Without Home” by Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu.

 

This episode is hosted by Lara Sato from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Zaccai Ceruti from James Campbell High School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, March 11 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, March 12 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Kapaa High School: Shave Ice

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapaa High School on Kauai report on an organic, 21st Century twist on an iconic Hawaii treat – shave ice. For decades, shave ice, brought to Hawaii by the Japanese, consisted of brightly and artificially colored syrup on shaved ice in a paper cone. Today, entrepreneurs on Kauai have created a new niche with a supposedly healthier, all-natural, no-food-coloring-added version of this classic refreshment. And speaking of favorite island treats, we’ll visit the HIKI NŌ archives for a Waiakea High School (Hawaii Island) story about a family-run business that adds Technicolor to traditional Japanese mochi.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Waianae Intermediate School in West Oahu tell the inspiring story of their after-school activities director’s weight-loss journey.

 

Students at Hongwanji Mission School on Oahu introduce us to a blind singer who dispels some common myths about what it’s like to live without sight.

 

Students at Hana K-12 School in East Maui show us how to make beautiful prints with something found in most Hawaii backyards.

 

And students at Campbell High School on Oahu present a fresh, expressionistic approach to telling the story of a young woman with cerebral palsy.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 18 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 19 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 





HIKI NŌ
Focus on Generation Z

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the winter quarter of the 2015-16 school year. Besides being excellent stories, the features in this compilation were also selected for how they reflect the values of Generation Z: people born in 1995 or later. HIKI NŌ students, currently middle and high schoolers, are part of Generation Z. National surveys show that, in general, Gen Z-ers are tech-savvy entrepreneurs who are very aware of the world’s problems and are looking for practical ways to solve them. They are empathetic to others, socially conscious, tend not be gender or age biased and share an affinity with senior citizens.

 

The stories featured in this compilation, along with the Gen Z trends they reflect, are:

 

“A Home for Larenzo” (Waianae Intermediate School – Oahu)
A student leader at the Waianae Boys and Girls Club is found to be homeless.
Gen Z trend: They are growing up in a post 9/11 world during a recession, with 1 in 4 American children living in poverty.

 

“Science Teacher” (Sacred Hearts Academy – Oahu)
A female science teacher at an all-girls school receives national recognition from President Obama.
Gen Z trend: Traditional gender roles are being challenged.

 

“Ukulele Hale” (Mid-Pacific – Oahu)
An ukulele virtuoso decides to open his own music school rather than be employed by someone else’s school.
Gen Z trend: Entrepreneurship is in their DNA.

 

“Dog Wheelchair” (Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School – Kauai)
An 8th grade girl uses an engineering app to design and build a wheelchair for her disabled dog.
Gen Z trend: They use technology to solve problems.

 

“Deaf Cheerleader” (Maui High School – Maui)
A deaf high school student is determined to do everything her hearing peers can do, including being part of the Junior Varsity cheerleading squad.
Gen Z trend: They are empathetic and accepting of differences.

 

“Joe Young” (Kapaa Middle School – Kauai)
A retired police officer beats prostate cancer without surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. His cure: leading a happy life.
Gen Z trend: They have a great affinity and respect for elders.

 

“Iloreta Brothers” (Kapaa High School – Kauai)
A young man with Cerebral Palsy and his brother participate in long distance runs to promote their social awareness campaign called “I Am My Ability, I Am Not My Disability.”
Gen Z trend: They exhibit social entrepreneurship.

 

This edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by HIKI NŌ alumna, University of Hawaii at Manoa Communications/Political Science major, and Gen Z-er Shisa Kahaunaele.

 

This program encores Saturday, April 9 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, April 10 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by McKinley High School

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Kapaa High School on Kauai tell the story of Joshua and Jason Iloreta, two brothers who train and compete together in long-distance running races. To most people his does not seem unusual, until they find out that older brother Joshua has cerebral palsy – a neurological disorder that appears in infancy or early childhood and permanently affects body movement and muscle coordination. Jason pushes Joshua in a race-designed wheelchair as he runs. Their goal is to someday do a full marathon together. Their participation in long-distance races is part of an awareness campaign the brothers started which they call “I Am My Ability, I Am Not My Disability.” Their intent is to spread awareness that cerebral palsy does not impair people’s cognition and intelligence and that they can lead fulfilling and productive lives with the condition.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School in Central Oahu tell the story of Lorenzo Taguro-Bear, a very outgoing young leader who, unbeknownst to his peers and advisors at the Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii, used to live in a homeless encampment in Waianae.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai present a primer on how to make friends.

 

Students at the private all-girl school Sacred Hearts Academy in Kaimuki feature their science teacher Erin Flynn, who inspires her students to shatter the stereotype that science is for boys.

 

Expanding on the theme of breaking gender-based stereotypes, we revisit a story from the HIKI NŌ archives by Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu about a girls’ flight school.

 

Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui feature John Plunkett, who tells the heartfelt story of his family’s deep connection to their homeland of Kihei, Maui.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by McKinley High School.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 5 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 6 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Outstanding stories from Spring Quarter 2014/2015

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights is hosted by HIKI NŌ grad Victoria Cuba and features some of the outstanding stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2014/2015 school year:

 

From Waipahu High School on Oahu: a follow-up story on Victoria Cuba. We first met Victoria last season as a senior at Waipahu High School, when she opened up about being homeless. Now, she attends the University of Hawaii at Manoa on a full scholarship and interns at PBS Hawaii. No longer homeless, she resides in a UH dorm, but admits that the transition has had its challenges.

 

From Kapaa High School on Kauai: the story of a new program created by the Kauai Humane Society to encourage the adoption of dogs. Volunteers take dogs from the Kauai Humane Society on field trips to various places on the island to help them meet potential owners.

 

From Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu: an introduction to P.E. for the 21st century. When students take physical education at this high-tech middle school on the Ewa plain, they don’t just play dodge ball or run laps around the track. We learn how their innovative P.E. program is using computer technology to help students get fit both physically and technologically.

 

From Mid Pacific Institute on Oahu: a profile of Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winning musician Mark Yamanaka. Yamanaka shares one of the biggest challenges of his life – not being of Hawaiian ancestry and wanting to play Hawaiian music.

 

From Moanalua High School on Oahu: the story of Moanalua history teacher Cris Pasquil, who uses non-traditional activities like group projects, skits and even music to instill a love of learning in his students. He draws inspiration from his own experience learning hula under kumu hula Robert Cazimero and his halau’s victory at the esteemed Merrie Monarch Festival earlier this year.

 

From Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island: the story of how their school is trying to develop one of only two high school lacrosse teams on the island. Konawaena teacher Daniel Curran is on a mission to make lacrosse a mainstream sport in Hawaii. Starting a team has many unique challenges, but students say the benefits are worth it.

 

From Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: the story of their experience at the 2015 Student Television Network conference and video competition in San Diego, California. Although the primary purpose of their trip was to participate in the video competition, they also spent a great deal of time volunteering for worthy San Diego-based causes. The Maui Waena students went on to win several awards at the competition, but they consider their hours of community service as the most rewarding part of the trip.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by James Campbell High School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by James Campbell High School in Ewa Beach in West Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu introduces us to P.E. for the 21st century. When students take physical education at this high-tech middle school on the Ewa plain, they don’t just play dodge ball or run laps around the track. We learn how their innovative P.E. program is using computer technology to help students get fit both physically and digitally.

 

Also Featured:
Maui High School on the Valley Island explores the challenges of designing schools to provide a healthy learning environment while keeping out intruders. Architect Charles Kaneshiro, president of Group 70 International based in Honolulu, shows the design elements he incorporated at Puʻu Kukui Elementary School in Wailuku, Maui, to provide “zones of supervision” throughout the multi-building campus.

 

On Hawaii Island, Hawaii Preparatory Academy students Mason Dupont and Jacob McCafferty researched, designed and created a remote-controlled boat that can be used to study marine life such as whales. The boat wasn’t created for a traditional class in engineering or science, but for a self-directed, independent study project.

 

Kapaa High School on Kauai tells us about a new program created by the Kauai Humane Society to encourage the adoption of dogs. Volunteers take dogs from the Kauai Humane Society on field trips to various places on the island to help them meet potential owners.

 

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama on Oahu takes us into a classroom that takes 21st century skills to a new level as students learn the intricacies of cell division, land ecology and geographical mapping through the popular video game, Minecraft. Students experience hands-on interaction with the land, exploration of their Hawaiian culture, and, of course, video gaming! The results: collaboration that combines creativity, communication, critical thinking – and a little bit of chaos.

 

Students of Kapaa Middle School on Kauai show us what makes their May Day program different from others in the state, and reveal what it takes to prepare for this beloved Hawaii tradition.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 4 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, July 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School on the north shore of Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Why Are There So Many Mexican Restaurants in Kapaa?
Kapaa High School on Kauai explores why there are so many Mexican restaurants – 9, to be exact – in their small town of Kapaa, where there is only one Starbucks. In spite of the availability of so much Mexican food, restaurant owners don’t feel that they are in competition with each other as they offer regional specialties from Mexico that distinguish their offerings. Besides the popularity of Mexican food, the increasing Mexican population in Hawaii may be a reason for the proliferation of restaurants.

 

Also Featured:
Punahou School’s Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau Sails on Hokulea
Middle school students at Punahou School on Oahu feature their teacher, Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau, who recently sailed to New Zealand on Hokulea’s Malama Honua worldwide voyage. Kaniela’s mother was among Hokulea’s original crew, which instilled in him at a young age deep values for the ocean and how important it is to take care of each other.

 

Two Ladies Kitchen in Hilo
Waiakea High School on Hawaii Island visits Two Ladies Kitchen, which serves up over twenty flavors of mochi. The shop started with a family recipe and seven flavors and has grown, making it a popular stop for locals and visitors alike, and where kitchen staff have become family.

 

Pohole Salad A Hana Specialty
Hana K-12 School in East Maui shares how to make pohole salad, a popular dish in Hana that’s served at community gatherings and special events. It’s made from the pohole fern that grows in patches around Hana.

 

Master Storyteller Thomas Cummings
Kalani High School students in East Honolulu feature Uncle Tom Cummings, who has been telling stories for over forty years, weaving Hawaiian culture, mythology, history and values into tales that he started learning as a child. He captivates audiences using objects and “stuff” to illustrate his storytelling.

 

Na Hoku Hano Hano Award Winner Mark Yamanaka
Mid Pacific Institute students in the Manoa district of Oahu had an opportunity to interview award winning Hawaiian musician Mark Yamanaka and listen to his musical stylings. Yamanaka shares one of the biggest challenges of his life – not being of Hawaiian ancestry and wanting to play Hawaiian music.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 16 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 17 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is being hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui profile Kathryn Peterson, who has volunteered to help in the training of assistance dogs since she was 10 years old. The Seabury Hall senior is passionate about the service that assistance dogs provide for people with disabilities, enabling them to lead more independent and fulfilling lives.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School on Oahu share the story of their school principal, Alvin Parker, who served as a crewmember on the Aotearoa (New Zealand) leg of Hokulea’s World Wide Voyage, helping to promote the message of malama honua, or caring for the Earth; students from Kapaa High School on Kauai capture the lively activities that abound at their town’s monthly street fair; students from Kamehameha Schools Kapalama High School on Oahu feature Imiah Tafaovale, a Kamehameha sophomore who finds a convenient way to forgo the long school commutes that were robbing her of sleep; students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island document the creation of a community mural that showcases the cultural values of West Hawaii; students from Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island tell the story of Thomas “Tom Tom” Pahio, a Waipio taro farmer whose loi, or taro patches, serve both as an outdoor classroom for students and as test beds for taro varieties that can resist new environmental threats.