Jobs

Students at PBS Hawai‘i

The following position is currently open:

Student Production Technician – Part-time

 

In line with our educational mission, PBS Hawai‘i offers a training program for college students to gain valuable experience in the media industry. We offer student positions in media production, marketing/communications and graphic design.

 

College students have always been the backbone of PBS Hawai‘i’s production crew. Many of them have gone on to successful media careers. See some of their stories here!

 

 


 


Below are our available student positions:

Student Production Technician – Part-time

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The part-time Student Production Technician is an entry position within PBS Hawaii Creative Services. Training includes operating video cameras, video switcher, audio equipment, character generator, still store, teleprompter, floor directing, and assembling/lighting sets. Occasional field shoots required. Other duties include carrying equipment and set pieces (sometimes heavy), working atop 13 foot ladders, and driving company vehicles. Must be able to lift 40lbs. and have a clean drivers abstract. Hours vary weekly between 4 – 19 hrs., depending on the production schedule. Good availability on weekends and evenings a plus. Availability for weekly Thursday evening productions a must. Looking for applicants who can make a commitment of at least one year. No experience necessary. Starting pay is $ 8.50 per hour. This position reports directly to the Production Manager, but will also work under the leadership of any senior staff member assigned to the project.

 

PBS Hawai‘i
Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box 29606
Honolulu, HI   96820-2006

 

Or Email to humanresources@pbshawaii.org

 

Or fax to 808. 462. 5090.

 

EEO

 

Click to Download the PBS Hawai‘i Part-Time Employment Application Form (PDF)

 


 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
A Conversation with Our Four Mayors

 

With a new year, newly seated City and County Councils across our state, and a new State legislative session, INSIGHTS welcomes Hawai‘i’s four mayors for this live conversation: Maui County’s Alan Arakawa, Oahu’s Kirk Caldwell, Kaua‘i’s Bernard Carvalho and Hawai‘i County’s Harry Kim. Among other topics, they’ll discuss increasing divisions across the island chain, and how each county can work together as part of a unified state.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I is a live public affairs show that is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, or Twitter during the broadcast. You may email us ahead of time toinsights@pbshawaii.org, or include the #pbsinsights hashtag when posting on Twitter.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 




FRONTLINE
Divided States of America, Part 1 of 2

 

Days before the inauguration of the 45th American president, FRONTLINE looks at how events that occurred during the Obama presidency have revealed deep divisions in our country and examines the America the next president will inherit. This two- part program offers an in-depth view of the partisanship that gridlocked Washington and charged the 2016 presidential campaign, the rise of populist anger and the racial tensions that have erupted throughout the country.

 

Part One
Examine how Obama’s promise of change and unity collided with racial and political realities.

 

FRONTLINE
Divided States of America, Part 2 of 2

 

Days before the inauguration of the 45th American president, FRONTLINE looks at how events that occurred during the Obama presidency have revealed deep divisions in our country and examines the America the next president will inherit. This two- part program offers an in-depth view of the partisanship that gridlocked Washington and charged the 2016 presidential campaign, the rise of populist anger and the racial tensions that have erupted throughout the country.

 

Part Two
Examine racial tensions in America, the war for control of the GOP and the growing dysfunction in Washington.

 

Hawai‘i mayors to appear live on PBS Hawai‘i’s ‘Insights’

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

Hawai‘i mayors to appear live on PBS Hawai‘i’s ‘Insights’

 

Pictured, L-R: Alan Arakawa (Maui County), Kirk Caldwell (Honolulu County), Bernard Carvalho (Kaua‘i County) and Harry Kim (Hawai‘i County)

 

HONOLULU, HI – All four Hawai‘i mayors are scheduled to appear on the January 26, 8:00 pm live broadcast of Insights on PBS Hawai‘i. Insights is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org.

 

Alan Arakawa (Maui County), Kirk Caldwell (Honolulu County), Bernard Carvalho (Kaua‘i County) and Harry Kim (Hawai‘i County) will be discussing priorities for each of their counties, as they face 2017 with new city and county councils, and a new state legislative session. Two of them, Caldwell and Kim, are also beginning new terms.

 

As controversial issues including GMOs and commercial real estate development continue to take hold, the mayors will discuss increasing divisions across and within the counties, and how each island county can work together as a unified state.

 

Insights on PBS Hawai‘i is a public affairs program that airs live on Thursday nights at 8:00 on PBS Hawai‘i and pbshawaii.org.

 


 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

AMERICA BY THE NUMBERS WITH MARIA HINOJOSA
Native American Boomtown

 

The Bakken oil boom is bringing billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs to North Dakota. A substantial part of the oil production is concentrated on an Indian reservation. Fort Berthold Reservation’s 1,000-plus oil wells have brought in money and jobs for some, but oil has also brought danger – organized crime, hard drugs, traffic fatalities – and other problems. Tribe members speak about the benefits and consequences of the boom.

 

More incumbents sitting out debates?

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: The set of INSIGHTS

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiGeneral Managers of PBS stations across the country met last month for a strategy session, looking at what kind of programming is needed most in our country, and how to make the content more responsive and more interactive.

 

And in this election year of deep divisions and negativity, we compared notes on our television stations’ political debates and other forums. Longtime station managers remarked that they’d never seen so many local incumbents decline to appear with their challengers on live telecasts and live web streams.

 

“These incumbents have the money to create their own messages through advertising, and that’s what they’re doing instead,” said Tom Axtell, the head of Vegas PBS and a member of the PBS Board of Directors. Another GM noted that many candidates no longer feel obligated to appear alongside their competition because they can speak to the public through low-cost social media.

 

In Hawai‘i, we had our share of incumbents turning down participation in our weekly election forum on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, noting scheduling conflicts. We know that candidates are busy, so we generally ask them early. And we realize that incumbents may not be terribly motivated to let their lesser-known competitors receive statewide air time.

 

In addition, incumbents from 34 Hawai‘i State House and Senate races faced no opposition from another major-party candidate.

 

We even had a challenger withdraw from a General Election forum. That was Honolulu Mayoral candidate and political veteran Charles Djou. His campaign contended that it had never committed to the forum. (Before the Primary Election, Djou did take part in our forum with incumbent Mayor Kirk Caldwell and former Mayor Peter Carlisle.)

 

The rebuffs by candidates in some major races had a silver lining, freeing up TV time for district races, especially outside Honolulu and beyond O‘ahu. Incumbents and challengers with different ideas sat down at the same table, engaging in some interesting, vigorous and respectful discussions.

 

Viewers could feel the fresh breeze of democracy. At its best, this civil discourse provided much-needed substance and helped voters make their choice at the polls.

 

As Communications Professor John Hart of Hawai‘i Pacific University commented in a Honolulu Civil Beat podcast with reporter Chad Blair last October 10: “I still believe [debates] are our best chance to see past the pseudo-events, the slick advertisements. When you hear someone talk for an hour, you get a sense of who they are.”

 

This public media organization wants to thank all of the election candidates who accepted our invitation to inform voters by answering viewer questions and taking part in civil discourse on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

A hui hou (until next time)…
Leslie signature

 

 

PBS NEWSHOUR AND NPR
REPUBLICAN CONVENTION COVERAGE, Day 4

 

DAY 4
Tune in for live gavel-to-gavel coverage of the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland. PBS NewsHour and NPR join forces, marking the first time the two public media organizations are collaborating on convention coverage. Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff­ will co-anchor. NPR host Rachel Martin will be reporting from inside the hall with the NewsHour’s Lisa Desjardins and John Yang and NPR’s Sue Davis. They will also be joined by NPR’s Mara Liaisson, Ron Elving and Domenico Montenaro, as well as NewsHour regular contributors, including syndicated columnist Mark Shields, New York Times columnist David Brooks and Cook Political Report’s Amy Walter. Coverage will extend online and on social media to include live streaming of stage speeches and floor interviews.

 

This program will encore at 6:30 pm.

 

Questions for President Obama:
A PBS NEWSHOUR SPECIAL

 

PBS NEWSHOUR co-anchor and managing editor Gwen Ifill will sit down for an exclusive interview with President Obama in Elkhart, Indiana, followed by a town hall conversation with an audience of local residents. Topics covered will include the current election cycle, the economy, and America’s role in the world.

 

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