instinct

NATURE
Great Zebra Exodus

 

When thunderclouds begin to gather over Botswana’s Kalahari Desert each year, 20,000 zebras get itchy feet. As the first fat raindrops hit the dust, southern Africa’s biggest animal migration gets underway. In a never-ending quest for grass and water, the striped herds undertake an annual epic trek across the vast lunar landscape of the Kalahari’s Makgadikgadi Pans.

 

THE MIND OF A CHEF
Instinct and Discipline

 

It took a move to Los Angeles, starting a family and a rough restaurant review for Ludo to figure out what he really wanted to do. Examine the ties between artists and their education, and how childlike wonder can, in fact, translate into a career.

 

NATURE
Honey Badgers: Masters of Mayhem

 

This “thug of the savannah” is one the most fearless animals in the world, renowned for its ability to confront grown lions, castrate charging buffalo and shrug off the toxic defenses of stinging bees, scorpions and snakes. Little is known about its behavior in the wild or why it is so aggressive. This film follows badger specialists in South Africa who take on these masters of mayhem in ways that must be seen to be believed.

 

NATURE
Soul of the Elephant

 

Ironically, every dead elephant with its ivory intact is a reason to celebrate. It means an elephant died of natural causes, not bullets, snares or poison, and a soul was allowed to be celebrated and mourned by its herd. Award-winning filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert start with the remains of two bull elephants and through a series of key flashbacks, look at the lives they would have led, the dramas they may have seen, their great migrations for water with their families, and their encounters with lions and hyenas. This film, shot over two years, is an intimate look at elephants through the lens of two great storytellers of natural history.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Life in Captivity: Caring Confinement or Abuse?

 

With news of another dolphin encounter program coming to Hawai‘i, INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I examines the debate over marine mammals’ life in captivity. Is it right to hold marine mammals in captivity for entertainment or research purposes? Dolphins, sea lions, and seals are mainstay attractions at venues across the country. Proponents say the dolphins, sea lion, seals and other animals are safely cared for and they highlight the need for conservation; opponents say the animals suffer from overwork and abuse.

 

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Email:
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NATURE
Love in the Animal Kingdom

 

Animals dance, sing, flirt and compete with everything they’ve got to find and secure a mate. For many, the all-important bonds they share as a couple are what enable the next generation to survive. Can we call these bonds love‌? In this delightful, provocative look at the love life of animals, watch the feminine wiles of a young gorilla, the search for Mr. Right among a thousand flamingos, the open “marriages” of blue-footed boobies, the soap opera arrangements of gibbons and all the subtle, outrageous, romantic antics that go into finding a partner.

 

NATURE
Pets: Wild at Heart: Playful Creatures

 

In this program filled with innovative photography and scientific revelation, we investigate how our favorite pets get in touch with their wild side through play. From talkative budgies, marathon-running hamsters, wall-climbing cats and diving dogs, discover how our pets’ playful games are just a whisker away from the wild.

 

NOVA
Vaccines: Calling the Shots

 

Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago – including whooping cough, measles and mumps – are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. Go around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations and discover the risks of opting out.

 

NOVA
Mystery of Easter Island

 

A remote, bleak speck of rock in the Pacific, Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, has mystified the world ever since the first Europeans arrived in 1722. How and why did the ancient islanders build and move nearly 900 giant statues, or moai, weighing as much as 86 tons each? And how did they transform a presumed paradise into a treeless wasteland, bringing ruin upon their island and themselves? NOVA explores controversial recent claims that challenge decades of previous thinking about the islanders, who have been accused of everything from ecocide to cannibalism. Among the radical new theories is that the islanders used ropes to “walk” the statues upright, like moving a fridge. With the help of an accurate 15-ton replica statue, a NOVA team sets out to test this high-risk, seemingly unlikely theory – serving up plenty of action and surprises in this fresh investigation of one of the ancient world’s most intriguing enigmas.

 

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