Insights on PBS Hawai‘i

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Happens to Hawai‘i Elders Who Don’t Have a Personal Safety Net?

 

Whether it’s job loss, illness, divorce or other life circumstances, some islanders find themselves at wit’s end, running out of money in retirement. What options do they have? And how are Hawai‘i taxpayers affected? What happens to Hawai‘i elders who don’t have a personal safety net?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

Charles Djou withdraws from scheduled PBS Hawai‘i forum

PBS Hawaii

 

Charles Djou and Kirk CaldwellHONOLULU – Charles Djou has withdrawn from a live, televised mayoral candidates forum, which was scheduled for Thursday, October 27 at 8:00 pm on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Several weeks ago, the Republican mayoral candidate, along with the incumbent, Democrat Kirk Caldwell, agreed to a live discussion on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

This week, Sam Aiona from the Djou campaign told PBS Hawai‘i Djou was withdrawing from the appearance, stating, “We respectfully decline.” No further reason was given for the withdrawal.

 

Since August, candidates for State House and Senate races, as well as Honolulu and neighbor island council races, have been scheduled on Insights every week leading up to the General Election.

 

Insights on PBS Hawai‘i airs Thursday nights at 8:00 pm, with a live stream available on pbshawaii.org. The show’s trademark, loosely structured live format sets these discussions apart from traditional, rigid televised debate formats.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

Contact: Liberty Peralta

Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org

Phone: 808.462.5030

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
ELECTION POLICY

 

Insights on PBS Hawai‘i is a regularly scheduled news interview program. During this election season, PBS Hawai‘i will provide our trademark, loosely structured live format, featuring candidates discussing issues of community interest. PBS Hawai‘i exercises sole control over the format of the program. Depending on the number of candidates and newsworthy issues in a given race, there are practical limitations as to the number of candidates who can participate. PBS Hawai‘i’s decisions in presenting Insights are based on good-faith journalistic judgment in providing a conversation that will best serve the public interest.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Neighbor Island Doctor Shortage

 

Hawai‘i is nearly 900 doctors short of what we need to meet our medical needs, according to the University of Hawai‘i’s John A. Burns School of Medicine. This shortfall is expected to widen to 1,500 in the next five years. The shortage of primary care doctors and specialists is most serious on the neighbor islands, where many people go without medical care, or fly to Oahu or elsewhere for treatment. INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I explores what it may take to attract and retain primary care providers on our neighbor islands.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Should We Do with Hawai‘i’s Drug Offenders?


In Hawai‘i, a drug conviction can lead to jail time, especially when the drug is crystal
methamphetamine, the state’s top drug threat. Mandatory minimum prison sentences are
meant to deter trafficking, sale and use of crystal meth, but critics say drug treatment
might be a more effective and less expensive option than lock-up for non-violent offenders.
What should we do with Hawaii’s illegal drug offenders?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Can Our Community Better Understand Gender Diversity?

 

The film A Place in the Middle tells the true story of a young girl who feels at home in an all-male halau. Other young people in Hawai‘i are also trying to navigate a world traditionally defined by gender roles. How can our community better understand gender diversity?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Are Innovators Finding Ways to Lift People Out of Homelessness in Hawai‘i?

 

As the state and counties look for solutions to the homeless crisis in Hawai‘i, some people are finding creative ways to give the homeless shelter and opportunity. From faith-based organizations to individuals providing rooms in their own homes, these innovators are blazing their own trails to help the homeless.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Can Hawai‘i’s Special Education Services Boost Achievement for Students with Disabilities?

 

Education reform over the last decade has led to significant academic improvement for Hawai‘i’s public school students. But the state’s special education students haven’t enjoyed the same academic gains, despite the Department of Education devoting 23% of its budget to special education services for what is only about 10.5% of the Hawai‘i’s public school population. How can Hawai‘i’s special education services boost achievement for students with disabilities?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Have People Worked Their Way Out of Homelessness?

 

We see the tents lining the streets of Kaka‘ako and the encampments on the beaches, but what about what we don’t see? There are people in Hawai‘i who have worked their way out of homelessness, giving themselves and their family members an opportunity for a fresh start. What did it take for these formerly homeless people to create new lives for themselves?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

Can a Film Inspire Change when Change is Tough?

Can a Film Inspire Change when Change is Tough?

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiCan storytelling profoundly touch lives? Here at PBS Hawaii, the answer is a resounding yes. Belief in the power of storytelling to educate, and a conviction that education can transform perspectives and even lives, are the underpinnings of everything we do here.

 

Now here comes an independent Hawaii film that is a great example of storytelling meant to inspire and motivate – with the goal of improving public education. Matthew Nagato’s film, ʻike – Knowledge is Everywhere, shares intimate stories of efforts that are working – of real students, educators and advocates in Hawaii who are listening to community needs, who aren’t letting commonplace conflicts over resources and policy stop them, and who are collectively taking action.

 

“I think people are hungry for this type of storytelling… It’s hopeful and positive. It’s about what’s going right, not what’s going wrong,” Nagato says. His previous film, ola – Health is Everything, about another complex subject, health care in Hawaii, was well-received and also featured individuals making a collective difference.

 

On Thursday, September 24, at 8:00 pm, we are proud to present the statewide television debut of ʻike (which means knowledge). Stay with us for a live local discussion afterward, on Insights on PBS Hawaii, at a special time, 9:10 pm.

 

Many people already have seen this film in groups large and small. That’s because the filmmaker has taken it out for about 50 free community screenings on different islands, and he has invited attendees to express their thoughts.

 

Ken Hiraki, President of the Public Schools Foundation of Hawaii, has eagerly gone to seven community screenings and each time, he told me, the film has moved him to tears. And it has galvanized him to work with his organization to establish a Summer Scholars program at Waipahu High School.

 

Says film director Nagato: “I do see people take action as a result of a screening. They’ve said, ‘Let’s put down our shields and reach out to someone to work with, to partner with…and let’s develop something.’”

 

He believes firmly that “small, incremental changes overtake the problem at some point.”

 

We hope that you’re able to watch Matthew Nagato’s humbly provocative film on PBS Hawaii on September 24. He’ll be on hand for the live discussion to follow. We invite you to get involved by calling in, tweeting, or emailing your comments and questions.

 

A hui hou (until next time),

Leslie signature

 

 

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