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NA MELE
Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr.

NA MELE Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr.

 

This special NA MELE presentation pairing Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr. has a special significance, as both are the sons of Hawaiian music icons: slack key guitar legend Gabby “Pops” Pahinui and Peter Moon Sr., a seminal figure in the Hawaiian Renaissance of the 1970s.

 

Cyril and Peter Moon Jr.’s master-apprentice process is rooted in the “old style” approach to teaching: watch, listen and learn. That was how Cyril learned from his father, and this technique has borne fruit with Peter Moon Jr. as the two of them, along with special guest Jeff Ahoy on steel guitar, perform in a jam session at the PBS Hawaii studio.

 

NATURE
Dolphins: Spy in the Pod, Part 2

 

The Spy Creatures continue to reveal the world of dolphins, their mysteries of communication and strategies. Go undercover to meet the orca, the largest dolphins, and race the Dall’s porpoises, the fastest dolphins in the world.

 

NATURE
Dolphins: Spy in the Pod, Part 1

 

The camera eyes of 13 ingenious Spy Creatures, including Spy Dolphin, Spy Nautilus and Spy Turtle, capture dolphin behavior, as never filmed before. The spycams infiltrate the social world of dolphins, including their strange gatherings and gang rivalries.

 

Roland Cazimero, Almost 3 Years After Onstage Illness

Robert Cazimero, musician and entertainer.

 

Roland Cazimero, who was hospitalized after falling ill in 2014 during The Brothers Cazimero’s Maui May Day concert, and who has since performed only rarely, speaks with me about his health challenges, personal life and career in a Long Story Short episode debuting Tuesday, April 25 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Roland, whose nickname is Bozo or Boz, still hadn’t discussed the state of his health with his older brother and longtime music partner, Robert Cazimero: “We just don’t.” But he believes Robert knows that the sun has set on their iconic performances.

 

A virtuoso of the 12-string guitar, Roland would let Robert, on bass, handle the artful and upbeat onstage oratory and the smooth segues between songs. Roland injected teasing; he also was a master of short, flippant remarks. Together, the Brothers drew crowds and created enduring fans with their beautiful, soaring music and their entertaining banter.

 

In our conversation, Roland speaks comfortably and at length about picking up music easily as a kid in a musical family, but never getting formal piano lessons like his brother Robert and his twin sister Tootsie, because he was “kolohe” (a rascal). Also as a keiki, he met the legendary singer/guitarist Gabby Pahinui, and was entrusted with buffing up Pahinui’s guitar. He laughs that Gabby never got his name right; Roland was always Ronald.

 

As an adult, he was a “rebel” and a “player,” or womanizer. He said Robert and their hula dancer, the late Leina‘ala Heine, would take care of devoted fans and “high makamakas,” and Roland would “hang with the hoodlums.” They were his friends, and he says almost all of them have died, some in prison.

 

Appearing at PBS Hawai‘i with his loyal wife and caregiver Lauwa‘e, Roland explains matter-of-factly that his partying lifestyle was bad for his health, which is still touch-and-go. The couple reveals that he’s been diagnosed with congestive heart failure, diabetes and carpal tunnel syndrome.

 

Now more of a homebody, Roland still writes songs and plays guitar, adjusting for his carpal tunnel condition. Lauwa‘e, who holds down an admin job when she’s not taking care of him, is his “best friend in the world,” he says – next to God, who’s “the best, period.”

 

One doctor told him plainly that he should make peace with his maker. “Done,” says Roland. While he’s still not always compliant with what the doctor says, he’s become a follower of Christ. When people ask about his health, Lauwa‘e likes to keep the answer short and sweet: “He’s alive.”

 

For any of us, that’s a gift.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

NATURE
Yosemite

 

Yosemite Valley is a land forged in wildfire and sculpted by water, and the delicate balance of these two elements is essential to the creatures and trees that call this land their home. But with climates changing and temperatures rising, the Sierras are under siege. Water is scarcer and the threat of fire is more common. Join scientists and adventurers as they trudge through mountains of snow, climb trees as tall as buildings and soar high in the air to spy just how these global changes are affecting one of America’s greatest wildernesses.

 

Keepers of the Flame: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women (2005)

 

The lives of three extraordinary Hawaiian women, Mary Kawena Pukui, ‘Iolani Luahine and Edith Kanaka‘ole, are chronicled in this film. It shows how, together, they combined their talents and commitment to reignite the flame of tradition in a time when Hawaiian culture was gravely threatened.

 






Workin’ Man Blues

Workin' Man Blues

 

Explore the dust bowl roots of country music in California through interviews with California music icons Merle Haggard, Buck Owens, and Dwight Yoakam. Grammy Award-winning musicians Michael Martin Murphey and Vince Gill also reflect on the importance of the Bakersfield sound on the country music scene.

 

David Bowie:
Five Years

DAVID BOWIE: Five Years

 

Trace five pivotal years in the late pop icon’s career: 1971 and the creation of Ziggy Stardust; 1975 with Young Americans and the Thin White Duke persona; 1977 and the release of Low and Heroes; 1980 with “Ashes to Ashes;” and 1983 with the huge commercial success of Let’s Dance.

 

AMERICAN MASTERS
Pedro E. Guerrero: A Photographer’s Journey

 

Discover the life and work of Mexican American photographer Pedro E. Guerrero, who collaborated with Frank Lloyd Wright and sculptors Alexander Calder and Louise Nevelson.

 

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