ho’omau

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Values Compilation

 

This episode is a compilation of stories that express the six Hawaiian values featured in the first round of the 2015-16 season. Here are the Hawaiian values featured and the stories that represent them:

 

Ho’omau (to persevere, perpetuate or continue) is represented by a story from Maui High School, which follows former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles Adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia is used to battling opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan. But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere against an enemy she is not familiar with – uncertainty.

 

Kuleana (responsibility) is represented by a story from Waianae High School in West Oahu. Waianae High School graduate and UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fighter Max Holloway feels it is his kuleana to represent the Waianae community in the most positive way possible when he competes. Max also takes his responsibilities to his wife and young son very seriously. Having been severely neglected by his own parents, Max wants to make sure his son does not have to suffer the same sort of childhood that he had.

 

Ha’aha’a (humbleness and humility) is represented by a story from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai. Kauai resident Moses Hamilton learned humbleness and humility when he had to start all over again after a car accident that left him a quadriplegic. While undergoing rehab, Moses took up mouth painting (painting by holding and manipulating the paint brush in one’s mouth), and is a now a successful artist who sells his paintings in Hanalei.

 

‘Imi na’auao (enlightenment and wisdom) is represented by a story from Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people – learning the culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

‘Ike Pono (to know what is right) is represented by a story from Maui Waena Intermediate School about Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often on the wrong side the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. He encourages his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods.

 

Mālama (to care for, protect and maintain) is represented by a story from Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu, about the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its community of volunteers to mālama the Hawaiian Monk Seal. Mālama is also represented by a video primer from Kauai High School on how to “take care” in the event of a hurricane.

 

This episode is hosted by HIKI NŌ alum (and current Political Science/ Communications double-major at UH Manoa) Shisa Kahaunaele.

 

This program encores Saturday, Jan. 7 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaian Value: Ho’omau

 

This is the premiere episode of HIKI NŌ Season 7, and the first in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value.

 

The Hawaiian value for this show is ho’omau, which means to persevere, perpetuate, or continue.

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui High School, who follow former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia is used to contesting opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan. But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere against an enemy she is not familiar with: uncertainty.

 

Also featured are these student stories:
Roosevelt High School on Oahu tell the story of Papahana Kuaola, a non-profit organization in Kaneohe that contributes to the preservation of Hawaiian culture through the preservation of land and native plants, public awareness and the use of chant.

 

Kapolei High School on Oahu profile Kapolei football player Papu Uti, who lost his leg from a debilitating accident but expects to return to playing football with a prosthetic leg.

 

Connections Public Charter School on Hawaii Island feature world-renowned slack key guitarist Cyril Pahinui, who continues his father Gabby Pahinui’s legacy by using his father’s teaching methods at workshops.

 

Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauai tells the story of teacher Hope Kaimi Strickland who, raised on Niihau Island, honors her deceased husband’s wishes for their children to learn her Hawaiian culture and Niihau Hawaiian dialect.

 

Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu feature fellow student Crystal Cebedo. Crystal deals with the uncontrollable aspects of her life, such as her mother’s cancer, by keeping busy and meeting life’s challenges.

 

Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island shows us how the Kona Historical Society built an authentic, old-fashioned Portuguese oven for baking bread as a part of its efforts to recreate the traditions of old Kona.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Radford High School on Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 6 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Aug. 7 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.