HIKI NŌ

THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards
Part One

HIKI NŌ Awards Nominees and Winners March 23, 2017

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ features highlights from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards live-streamed announcements of the winners.

 

On Saturday, March 11th, the results of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards were announced by PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā in a four-island, closed-circuit, live-stream awards show originating from the PBS Hawai‘i studio on O‘ahu. HIKI NŌ teachers and students from the nominated schools gathered at their respective locations to watch the announcements: Paliku Theatre at Windward Community College on O‘ahu; McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center on Maui; the Kaua‘i Marriott Resort on Kaua‘i; Honua Studios in Kona; and the Waiakea High School library in Hilo. Each time an award was announced, the teacher and students from the winning school came onstage to accept their award from a PBS Hawai‘i Board member: a bronze medal for third place, silver for second place and gold for first. Gold medalists also won a $1,000 gift card to purchase equipment for their school’s media program.

 

This episode features the medal-winning schools (and their stories) for Best Personal Profile Middle School Division, Best Personal Profile High School Division, Best Writing Middle School Division and Best Writing High School Division.

 

The remainder of the awards will be covered in next week’s show: The 2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS, Part 2.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 11 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, March 12 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #813 – Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing

 

The fifth in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for:

 

–Best Franchise Piece (Hana K-12 School on Maui, Kalani High School on O‘ahu, Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i, Kaua‘i High School, Moloka‘i High School, Pacific Buddhist Academy on O‘ahu);

 

–Best Factoid (Hana K-12 School on Maui, Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy on Hawai‘i Island; Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island, Mililani High School on O‘ahu, McKinley High School on O‘ahu);

 

–Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing (Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i, Maui High School, Moanalua High School on O‘ahu, Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu, and Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu).

 

This episode is hosted by Alyssa Ryhn from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Desiree Kanui from Nanakuli Intermediate School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, Feb. 25 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



On March 8, Whole Foods Market will donate 5% of Hawai‘i net sales to PBS Hawai‘i

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo are among those from the 90 public, private and charter schools across the Islands in HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i’s flagship digital learning initiative, which will benefit from Whole Foods Market’s Community Giving Day.HONOLULU – Whole Foods Market Hawai‘i has selected PBS Hawai‘i as its statewide nonprofit partner for its upcoming Community Giving Day on Wednesday, March 8.

 

Pictured: Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo are among those from the 90 public, private and charter schools across the Islands in HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i’s flagship digital learning initiative, which will benefit from Whole Foods Market’s Community Giving Day.

 

That day, five percent of net sales from all three Whole Foods Market locations in Hawai‘i – Kahala and Kailua on O‘ahu, and Kahului on Maui – will go toward supporting PBS Hawai‘i’s mission of advancing learning and discovery through its video programming.

 

Whole Foods Market hosts Community Giving Days twice a year to benefit local nonprofits. These initiatives are part of the company’s core values and commitment to serving and supporting local and global communities.

 

“We are thrilled to partner with PBS Hawai‘i, as we have a shared interest in providing the highest quality products,” says Annalee England, Whole Foods Market Kahului Store Team Leader. “Whole Foods Market does so through our selection of the best natural, organic and locally sourced foods, and PBS Hawai‘i through their incomparable programming for the whole family.”

 

PBS Hawai‘i’s statewide digital learning initiative, HIKI NŌ, will benefit from the Community Giving Day. Through this program, PBS Hawai‘i offers free digital storytelling training for the program’s 90 participating public, private and charter schools across the Islands. The student video stories that result from this training are showcased online at pbshawaii.org, and on Thursday nights at 7:30 on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Since its launch in 2011, HIKI NŌ has served more than 4,800 students. More than half of HIKI NŌ schools are Title I, the federal designation of schools with at least 40 percent of students coming from low-income families.

 

“With HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawai‘i is bridging serious educational and socioeconomic gaps,” says Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO. “This partnership with Whole Foods Market will help us with this important work in our island communities – some as near as those in PBS Hawai‘i’s own neighborhood of Kalihi, and as far and remote as South Point on Hawai‘i Island.”

 

Other programs produced locally by PBS Hawai‘i include the live, weekly community affairs program Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, the half-hour interview program Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox and the Hawaiian music series Na Mele.

 

As the Islands’ only member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service, PBS Hawai‘i carries flagship PBS programs, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Independent Lens, NOVA, Frontline and educational children’s programming on PBS KIDS.

 

PBS Hawai‘i is also one of a handful of PBS stations in the country to carry a live feed of English-language international news coverage from Japanese public broadcaster NHK World.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS RESULTS

HIKI NŌ Awards Nominees March 23, 2017

 

The 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards

PBS Hawai‘i recognizes exceptional storytelling skills of middle and high school students throughout our Islands who participate in HIKI NŌ, our statewide digital learning initiative and student news program.

 

The nominees were chosen from HIKI NŌ shows that aired during the 2015-2016 school year and the Fall Semester of this current school year. You can view each nominated piece by clicking on its name in the list below. (You can also watch the nominated projects, by category, Thursdays at 7:30 pm, Saturdays at noon, and Sundays at 3:00 pm on PBS Hawai’i.)

 

This year’s Gold, Silver and Bronze winners are indicated below. Winning stories, as well as highlights from this year’s awards celebrations, will be featured on our two-part 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards Show, Thursday, March 23 and Thursday, March 30 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i. Congratulations to all nominees and winners – and mahalo to all the students, teachers and mentors who help make HIKI NŌ a success in our public, private and charter schools throughout Hawai‘i.

 


 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Homeschooled Student” SILVER

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Moses Hamilton” GOLD

Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu) – “Laurie Rubin” BRONZE

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Joe Young”

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “John Plunkett”

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Bipolar Artist”

James Campbell High School (O‘ahu) – “Miracle Baby” GOLD

Maui High School (Maui) – “Marc Unites”

Mid-Pacific (O‘ahu) – “Ukulele Hale” BRONZE

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Living With Pain” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Front Office”

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “K-9 Search & Rescue” GOLD

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui) – “Feed My Sheep”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Love Laundry” BRONZE

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui) – “Airconditioning”

Mililani Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Mokauea Island” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kapolei High School (O‘ahu) – “Best Buddies Basketball”

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Biomass” GOLD

Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy PCS (Hawai‘i Island) – “Opelu Fishing” BRONZE

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “Text Neck” SILVER

Saint Francis School (O‘ahu) – “Lucy’s Lab Creamery”

Waiakea High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Cosplay”

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Dog Wheelchair”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Firefighter”

Ka Waihona o Ka Naʻauao PCS (O‘ahu) – “Steel Guitar” BRONZE

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “Haleakala Mules” SILVER

Wai‘anae Intermediate School (O‘ahu)– “A Home For Larenzo” GOLD

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Life After Sugar”

Kapa‘a High School (Kaua‘i) – “Iloreta Brothers” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “A Love Story”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Deaf Cheerleader” BRONZE

Waiʻanae High School (O‘ahu) – “Without Home” SILVER

 

BEST FRANCHISE PIECE

Hana K-12 (Maui) – “Ti Leaf Print”

Kalani High School (O‘ahu) – “Thaumatrope”

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “10 Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone” GOLD

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Hurricane Protection” BRONZE

Moloka‘i High School (Moloka‘i) “Text-A-Tip

Pacific Buddhist Academy (O‘ahu) – “Offering Incense” SILVER

 

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY & EDITING

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Junior Lifeguard”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Tourette” GOLD

Moanalua High School (O‘ahu) – “Equestrian” SILVER

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “IUCN”

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Parental Guidance Required” BRONZE

 

BEST FACTOID

Hana K-12  (Maui) – “School History”

Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy (Hawai‘i Island) – “Solar Trees” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Wildcats”

Mililani High School (O‘ahu) – “Red Dirt” BRONZE

President William McKinley High School (O‘ahu) – “School Spirit” SILVER

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #808 – Teachers of the Year

 

Of the eight Hawai‘i Department of Education District Teachers of the Year for the 2016-2017 school year, two are HIKI NŌ teachers: Luane Higuchi from Wai‘anae Intermediate School (Leeward District), and Jennifer Suzuki from Maui Waena Intermediate School (Maui District). Both teachers discuss what the District Teacher of the Year honor means to them, and the impact HIKI NŌ has had on them and their students.

 

This program encores Saturday, Jan. 14 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 15 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Values Compilation

 

This episode is a compilation of stories that express the six Hawaiian values featured in the first round of the 2015-16 season. Here are the Hawaiian values featured and the stories that represent them:

 

Ho’omau (to persevere, perpetuate or continue) is represented by a story from Maui High School, which follows former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles Adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia is used to battling opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan. But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere against an enemy she is not familiar with – uncertainty.

 

Kuleana (responsibility) is represented by a story from Waianae High School in West Oahu. Waianae High School graduate and UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fighter Max Holloway feels it is his kuleana to represent the Waianae community in the most positive way possible when he competes. Max also takes his responsibilities to his wife and young son very seriously. Having been severely neglected by his own parents, Max wants to make sure his son does not have to suffer the same sort of childhood that he had.

 

Ha’aha’a (humbleness and humility) is represented by a story from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai. Kauai resident Moses Hamilton learned humbleness and humility when he had to start all over again after a car accident that left him a quadriplegic. While undergoing rehab, Moses took up mouth painting (painting by holding and manipulating the paint brush in one’s mouth), and is a now a successful artist who sells his paintings in Hanalei.

 

‘Imi na’auao (enlightenment and wisdom) is represented by a story from Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people – learning the culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

‘Ike Pono (to know what is right) is represented by a story from Maui Waena Intermediate School about Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often on the wrong side the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. He encourages his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods.

 

Mālama (to care for, protect and maintain) is represented by a story from Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu, about the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its community of volunteers to mālama the Hawaiian Monk Seal. Mālama is also represented by a video primer from Kauai High School on how to “take care” in the event of a hurricane.

 

This episode is hosted by HIKI NŌ alum (and current Political Science/ Communications double-major at UH Manoa) Shisa Kahaunaele.

 

This program encores Saturday, Jan. 7 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #807 – What I Learned

 

Viewers enjoy watching the final, PBS Hawai‘i approved versions of HIKI NŌ stories, but very few have any idea what the students go through to develop their stories to the point where they meet PBS Hawai‘i’s stringent on-air standards. This special episode explores the students’ learning processes by presenting four previously-aired HIKI NŌ stories, followed by behind-the-scenes “What I Learned” mini-documentaries on the experiences of the students who created the stories.

 

The stories featured (along with their corresponding “What I Learned” vignettes) include:

 

–A workspace created by and for students called The Canvas (pictured), from Kalani High School (O‘ahu);

 

–A blind performing arts teacher, from Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu);

 

–A Kaua‘i food truck entrepreneur, from Kaua‘i High School;

 

–A Navy-veteran amputee who is learning to live with pain, from Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu).

 

This special episode is hosted by Kalani High School Senior Anya Carroll and Hongwanji Mission School 7th grader Teo Fukamizu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #805

 

TOP STORY
Students from Volcano Arts & Sciences School on Hawai‘i Island introduce us to environmental entertainer Dina Kageler. Ms. Kageler, herself a parent, uses music to teach students at Volcano Arts & Sciences about the natural wonders of the Volcano district of the Big Island. She also mounts an annual school musical that celebrates the flora, fauna and natural beauty of the area.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Saint Francis School in the Manoa district of O‘ahu feature a young entrepreneur who dedicated his innovative ice cream parlor –Lucy’s Lab Creamery – to his late “tiger mom” mother.

 

Students at Waiakea Intermediate School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island show viewers how to beat the heat by creating their very own traditional Japanese uchiwa fan.

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, explore how well- suited the soil at Maui’s HC&S sugar plantation will be for diversified agriculture once sugar production shuts down for good.

 

Students at Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu show us what it’s like to be home-schooled.

 

And students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu introduce us to a football coach who acts as a surrogate father to his players.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 17 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 18 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



1 2 3 9