Hawaii Preparatory Academy

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Ike pono

This episode is the fifth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘ike pono, which means to know what is right. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui Waena Intermediate School who feature Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often in trouble with the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. His motivation for opening the business was not to make money, but to provide his family and community with healthy snacks, to employ people who need a helping hand (like he did), and to encourage his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods. “I went from someone who wasn’t doing Maui any good to someone who is making a difference,” says Cousins.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sosefina Matautia, once a self-professed bully at Waianae Intermediate School, decided to do the right thing and change her ways. While becoming a kinder, better person benefitted those around her, Sosefina was motivated to change because of her own dreams of someday becoming a doctor.

 

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui): Led by math teacher Debi Davis, Seabury Hall Middle School students do the right thing for the less fortunate by weaving colorful yarn hats that are distributed around the world to help brighten the lives of underprivileged children.

 

Kealakehe High School (Hawaii Island): Students and other community members in Kona do the right thing by banding together to build Habitat for Humanity homes for families on the Hawaiian Homes wait list.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): Sometimes doing what you know is right requires great sacrifice. Sometimes doing what is right means doing less for yourself. Such is the case with Waianae High School student Daisy Agae, whose grades suffer because she has to take care of her two younger brothers, one of whom is a special needs child born with debilitating medical conditions.

 

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (Hawaii Island): Hawaii Island resident William ”Black” Abraham was headed down the wrong path as a young adult, until he decided to do the right thing and dedicate his life to saving lives. He did so by becoming an Ocean Safety Officer at Hapuna Beach and is now inspiring the next generation of lifesavers through his Junior Lifeguard training program.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui High (Maui): An East Maui couple do the right thing by taking in and caring for animals with debilitating and life-threatening illnesses. As a result, their home has become the East Maui Animal Refuge, more affectionately known as the Boo-Boo Zoo. This episode is hosted by Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #802

 

TOP STORY
Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawai‘i Island tell the amazing story of their school’s “Come Fly With Me” program that teaches middle school students how to pilot actual helicopters. The program takes students from classroom instruction (where they learn about the different parts of a helicopter and what they do) to actual flight-time. From the experience, students learn the value of remaining calm under pressure and how to think on their feet. The program is also used to get students to think about aviation as a possible career path.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–A student from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tells the very personal story of how her father, who lost his leg in a motorcycle accident, copes with intense pain every day.

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui feature a local teacher/writer who brings Hawai‘i’s plantation days back to life on the printed page.

 

–Students at Hawaii Technology Academy on O‘ahu demonstrate how to tie a bow-tie and, as a result, add some flair to one’s wardrobe.

 

–Students at Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kaua‘i tell us of their school’s special relationship with Saint Thomas University in Minnesota. And students from Hawaii Mission Academy on O‘ahu introduce us to the grandson of one of the most beloved Hawaiian cultural icons of all time: Mary Kawena Pukui.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 26 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Nov. 27 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hongwanji Mission School

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Mid-Pacific in the Manoa district of Oahu tell how former UH Warrior assistant football coach and former NFL player Rich Miano devoted his life to exceling in football as a reaction to the tragic death of his brother Robert Miano. Soon after the Miano family moved to Hawaii from Massachusetts, a teenaged Robert Miano lost his footing on an ocean cliff in Portlock, injured his head and passed away. Says Rich, “We [he and Robert] shared the same room, we played the same sports, we walked home together. We were inseparable. He was my best friend.” To honor the memory of his brother, Rich wore Robert’s jersey number (38) throughout his career and channeled his inspiration into tremendously successful careers as a player and coach.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu explore the challenges of moms deployed for military duty abroad.

 

As a companion piece to this story, we turn to the HIKI NŌ archives for a past story from Kainalu Elementary School in Windward Oahu about programs that help elementary school children deal with the trauma of separation from their deployed parents.

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui profile teenaged artist Sofia Bews, whose artwork has been featured in the prestigious online and print publication Rookie Mag.

 

Students at Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island tell the story of the Annual BK Fun Run, held in honor of HPA alumna Bieni Kohler Johnson, who passed away from breast cancer.

 

Students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai tell the story of basketball coach Clarence Sales. Clarence became paralyzed from the waist down as the result of an injury sustained in a fight. Rather than giving up on life, Clarence decided to use his experience in overcoming adversity to teach valuable life lessons to his players.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Hongwanji Mission School in the Nuuanu district of Honolulu.

 

This program encores Saturday, April 2 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, April 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.


HIKI NŌ
Hosted by James Campbell High School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by James Campbell High School in Ewa Beach in West Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu introduces us to P.E. for the 21st century. When students take physical education at this high-tech middle school on the Ewa plain, they don’t just play dodge ball or run laps around the track. We learn how their innovative P.E. program is using computer technology to help students get fit both physically and digitally.

 

Also Featured:
Maui High School on the Valley Island explores the challenges of designing schools to provide a healthy learning environment while keeping out intruders. Architect Charles Kaneshiro, president of Group 70 International based in Honolulu, shows the design elements he incorporated at Puʻu Kukui Elementary School in Wailuku, Maui, to provide “zones of supervision” throughout the multi-building campus.

 

On Hawaii Island, Hawaii Preparatory Academy students Mason Dupont and Jacob McCafferty researched, designed and created a remote-controlled boat that can be used to study marine life such as whales. The boat wasn’t created for a traditional class in engineering or science, but for a self-directed, independent study project.

 

Kapaa High School on Kauai tells us about a new program created by the Kauai Humane Society to encourage the adoption of dogs. Volunteers take dogs from the Kauai Humane Society on field trips to various places on the island to help them meet potential owners.

 

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama on Oahu takes us into a classroom that takes 21st century skills to a new level as students learn the intricacies of cell division, land ecology and geographical mapping through the popular video game, Minecraft. Students experience hands-on interaction with the land, exploration of their Hawaiian culture, and, of course, video gaming! The results: collaboration that combines creativity, communication, critical thinking – and a little bit of chaos.

 

Students of Kapaa Middle School on Kauai show us what makes their May Day program different from others in the state, and reveal what it takes to prepare for this beloved Hawaii tradition.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 4 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, July 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is being hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui profile Kathryn Peterson, who has volunteered to help in the training of assistance dogs since she was 10 years old. The Seabury Hall senior is passionate about the service that assistance dogs provide for people with disabilities, enabling them to lead more independent and fulfilling lives.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School on Oahu share the story of their school principal, Alvin Parker, who served as a crewmember on the Aotearoa (New Zealand) leg of Hokulea’s World Wide Voyage, helping to promote the message of malama honua, or caring for the Earth; students from Kapaa High School on Kauai capture the lively activities that abound at their town’s monthly street fair; students from Kamehameha Schools Kapalama High School on Oahu feature Imiah Tafaovale, a Kamehameha sophomore who finds a convenient way to forgo the long school commutes that were robbing her of sleep; students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island document the creation of a community mural that showcases the cultural values of West Hawaii; students from Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island tell the story of Thomas “Tom Tom” Pahio, a Waipio taro farmer whose loi, or taro patches, serve both as an outdoor classroom for students and as test beds for taro varieties that can resist new environmental threats.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Sacred Hearts Academy

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Sacred Hearts Academy in the Kaimuki district of Honolulu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of Momi Robins-Makaila, a Waianae Intermediate School teacher who has written a book about the domestic abuse she has suffered in her life and the effect it had on her son. TitledCandy Canes and Coke, Robins-Makaila’s book chronicles her abusive relationships and her journey toward healing.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island show how teenagers bridge the generation gap by helping senior citizens navigate new technology; students at Kapolei High School on Oahu profile a teenager who does not let his Type 1 Diabetes get in the way of his passion for BMX bike racing; students at Kalaheo High School on Oahu uncover a World War II bunker in Windward Oahu and discover its unique, post-war uses; students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle reveal the challenges facing an upcountry Maui farmer and the difficulty of getting food from farm to table; students at King Intermediate School on Oahu feature a tattooed woman who discusses her experiences with workplace attitudes toward her body art; and students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School try to uncover a 101-year-old Kauai man’s secret to living a long and healthy life. 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Sacred Hearts Academy

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Sacred Hearts Academy in the Kaimuki district of Honolulu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of Momi Robins-Makaila, a Waianae Intermediate School teacher who has written a book about the domestic abuse she has suffered in her life and the effect it had on her son. Titled Candy Canes and Coke, Robins-Makaila’s book chronicles her abusive relationships and her journey towards healing.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island show how teenagers bridge the generation gap by helping senior citizens navigate new technology; students at Kapolei High School on Oahu profile a teenager who does not let his Type 1 Diabetes get in the way of his passion for BMX bike racing; students at Kalaheo High School on Oahu uncover a World War II bunker in Windward Oahu and discover it’s unique, post-war uses; students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle reveal the challenges facing an upcountry Maui farmer and the difficulty of getting food from farm to table; students at King Intermediate School on Oahu feature a tattooed woman who discusses her experiences with workplace attitudes towards her body art; and students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School try to uncover a 101-year-old Kauai man’s secret to living a long and healthy life.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 1 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 2 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.