Hana K-12 School

HIKI NŌ
Episode #813 – Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing

 

The fifth in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for:

 

–Best Franchise Piece (Hana K-12 School on Maui, Kalani High School on O‘ahu, Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i, Kaua‘i High School, Moloka‘i High School, Pacific Buddhist Academy on O‘ahu);

 

–Best Factoid (Hana K-12 School on Maui, Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy on Hawai‘i Island; Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island, Mililani High School on O‘ahu, McKinley High School on O‘ahu);

 

–Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing (Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i, Maui High School, Moanalua High School on O‘ahu, Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu, and Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu).

 

This episode is hosted by Alyssa Ryhn from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Desiree Kanui from Nanakuli Intermediate School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, Feb. 25 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: Mālama

 

This episode is the final in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is mālama, which means to care for, protect and maintain.

 

The top story comes from the students at Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu, who report on the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its community of volunteers to mālama the Hawaiian Monk Seal.

 

Also featured are student stories from the following schools:

 

Seabury Hall Upper School (Maui): Paul Higashino of the Kahoolawe Island Reserve Commission welcomes and relies on the valuable assistance from volunteers in restoration and re-vegetation efforts on Kahoolawe Island, which for decades was used as a target in military exercises.

 

Kauai High School (Kauai): Students cover five key steps in preparing for a hurricane.

 

Maui High School (Maui): Maui resident Martha Watkins learns valuable lessons from caring for her Alzheimer’s Disease-stricken mother.

 

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kauai): Residents of Kauai mālama the traditional process practiced by their ancestors for generations of collecting pa’a’kai – sea salt –from a salt pond in Hanapepe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Students at Waianae Intermediate School mālama students with severe disabilities by acting as peer tutors in their adapted physical education class.

 

Punahou School (Oahu): Punahou Student Dakota Miller, the youngest beekeeper in Hawaii, cares for an apiary to help protect Hawaii’s dwindling bee population.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui): A community rebuilds Koieie Loko Ia, an ancient, royal fishpond in Kihei, Maui.

 

This episode is hosted by Hana K-12 School in Hana, Maui.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 10 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 81 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Kapaa High School: Shave Ice

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapaa High School on Kauai report on an organic, 21st Century twist on an iconic Hawaii treat – shave ice. For decades, shave ice, brought to Hawaii by the Japanese, consisted of brightly and artificially colored syrup on shaved ice in a paper cone. Today, entrepreneurs on Kauai have created a new niche with a supposedly healthier, all-natural, no-food-coloring-added version of this classic refreshment. And speaking of favorite island treats, we’ll visit the HIKI NŌ archives for a Waiakea High School (Hawaii Island) story about a family-run business that adds Technicolor to traditional Japanese mochi.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Waianae Intermediate School in West Oahu tell the inspiring story of their after-school activities director’s weight-loss journey.

 

Students at Hongwanji Mission School on Oahu introduce us to a blind singer who dispels some common myths about what it’s like to live without sight.

 

Students at Hana K-12 School in East Maui show us how to make beautiful prints with something found in most Hawaii backyards.

 

And students at Campbell High School on Oahu present a fresh, expressionistic approach to telling the story of a young woman with cerebral palsy.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 18 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 19 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 





HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Kamehameha Schools – Maui Middle School on Maui.

 

Top Story:
Students from Roosevelt High School on Oahu highlight the December 2014 inauguration of Governor David Ige at the Hawaii State Capitol, focusing on his vision for public education in Hawaii. Several Roosevelt students comment on the Governor’s vision and offer their own insights on education.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu, formerly a school for girls that recently welcomed its first male students, portray how senior Eislee Nakamasu lent his talents to transforming an annual student pageant into a shining, co-educational success; students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai showcase how Lanakila Kitchen in Lawai serves up good food while changing the lives of adults with disabilities;  students from Hana K-12 School on Maui tell the story of Megan Kalalau, a senior who does not let her blindness limit her dreams for the future; students at Wheeler Middle School on Oahu feature eighth-grader Macy Walters’ amazing trek to the top of Africa’s highest mountain to raise awareness of a rare autoimmune disease; and students from Island School on Kauai profile professional bodyboarder Dave Hubbard, capturing his thrilling rides on aerial video.

 

HIKI NŌ
hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School on the north shore of Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Why Are There So Many Mexican Restaurants in Kapaa?
Kapaa High School on Kauai explores why there are so many Mexican restaurants – 9, to be exact – in their small town of Kapaa, where there is only one Starbucks. In spite of the availability of so much Mexican food, restaurant owners don’t feel that they are in competition with each other as they offer regional specialties from Mexico that distinguish their offerings. Besides the popularity of Mexican food, the increasing Mexican population in Hawaii may be a reason for the proliferation of restaurants.

 

Also Featured:
Punahou School’s Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau Sails on Hokulea
Middle school students at Punahou School on Oahu feature their teacher, Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau, who recently sailed to New Zealand on Hokulea’s Malama Honua worldwide voyage. Kaniela’s mother was among Hokulea’s original crew, which instilled in him at a young age deep values for the ocean and how important it is to take care of each other.

 

Two Ladies Kitchen in Hilo
Waiakea High School on Hawaii Island visits Two Ladies Kitchen, which serves up over twenty flavors of mochi. The shop started with a family recipe and seven flavors and has grown, making it a popular stop for locals and visitors alike, and where kitchen staff have become family.

 

Pohole Salad A Hana Specialty
Hana K-12 School in East Maui shares how to make pohole salad, a popular dish in Hana that’s served at community gatherings and special events. It’s made from the pohole fern that grows in patches around Hana.

 

Master Storyteller Thomas Cummings
Kalani High School students in East Honolulu feature Uncle Tom Cummings, who has been telling stories for over forty years, weaving Hawaiian culture, mythology, history and values into tales that he started learning as a child. He captivates audiences using objects and “stuff” to illustrate his storytelling.

 

Na Hoku Hano Hano Award Winner Mark Yamanaka
Mid Pacific Institute students in the Manoa district of Oahu had an opportunity to interview award winning Hawaiian musician Mark Yamanaka and listen to his musical stylings. Yamanaka shares one of the biggest challenges of his life – not being of Hawaiian ancestry and wanting to play Hawaiian music.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 16 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 17 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.