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NA MELE
Hūʻewa

 

When you hear their name, you can’t help but smile. The young trio Hūʻewa is comprised of 17-year-old Kupu Dalire-Naʻauao, 19-year-old Kahi Lum-Young and 25-year old Kekoa Kane.

 

“‘Hū’ is to hum or to make sound, to make music. And ‘ewa’ is to go off course or to find your own path,” explained Hūʻewa member Kane. “…that’s what we do with our music…we make music on our own path, on a different style.”

 

In this brand new NA MELE, the trio performs songs including “Kaulana Niʻihau,” where theyʻre accompanied by the dancers of Hālau Ka Liko Pua O Kalaniakea; and a medley consisting of favorite songs of each member: “Kaulana Molokaʻi,” “Pauoa Liko Ka Lehua” and “Meleana Ē.” Dalire-Naʻauao explains, “The Hawaiian music that we chose, the type of songs that we chose…we just like to pull things from back in the day.”

 

NA MELE
‘Ale‘a

NA MELE 'Ale'a

 

An encore presentation of a performance from the PBS Hawai‘i studios in Manoa by this multi-Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winning group comprised of Kale Hannahs, Ryan Gonzalez and Chad Takatsugi. They combine sweet harmonies with tight instrumentals to produce enchanting traditional Hawaiian music reminiscent of years gone by.

 

The Highwaymen Live at Nassau Coliseum

 

Join Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson – “the Mt. Rushmore of country music” – for this live concert recorded in 1990. The Highwaymen perform classics like “Big River,” “Me and Bobby McGee” and “Always on My Mind.”

 

The History of the Sons of Hawaii

The History of the Sons of Hawai‘i

 

Some of the leading voices of the Hawaiian Cultural Renaissance, which began in the early 1960s, were musicians and singers. Their songs carried feelings that were yearning to be expressed throughout the island chain. Among the most influential groups of that era was the Sons of Hawaii, led by Eddie Kamae, already famous for his ʻukukele styling, and by the great vocalist and slack-key guitar virtuoso, Gabby Pahinui, together with bassist Joe Marshall and the brilliant young steel guitar player David “Feet” Rogers.

 

This 80-minute feature length documentary, the seventh in the Kamaes’ award-winning Hawaiian Legacy Series, tells the story of a charismatic band. Spanning forty years of Hawaiʻi’s rich musical tradition, the film offer an intimate look at a unique group of performers and composers, their songs, their humor, their devotion to a sound that continues to convey something essential about the Hawaiian spirit.

 

“Eddie Kamae’s popularity as a musical renaissance man and leader of the seminal band
Sons of Hawaiʻi, has been eclipsed by his appetite for filmmaking and his ability to capture voices of Hawaiʻi’s musical and cultural legacies”
– Wayne Harada, Honolulu Advertiser

 

Source: hawaiianlegacyfoundation.org

 

The Last Waltz

 

Watch Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell, Ronnie Wood, Neil Diamond, Eric Clapton and more perform with legendary rock group The Band in Martin Scorsese’s film that has been hailed as one of the greatest rock ‘n’ roll films ever made. On Thanksgiving Day in 1976, The Band took the stage for the very last time at the Winterland Theatre in San Francisco.

 

NA MELE
Haunani Apoliona and Kuʻuipo Kumukahi

NA MELE: Haunani Apoliona and Kuʻuipo Kumukahi

 

Multiple Hoku Hanohano Award-winners Haunani Apoliona and Ku’uipo Kumukahi present classic Hawaiian songs in both solo and duet performances.

 

NA MELE
More! Ledward Kaapana and Family

 

Ledward Kaapana remembers his Uncle Fred Punahoa playing the song “Radio Hula” in Kalapana: “In the morning, like one, two o’clock in the morning. In Kalapana, it’s so quiet, so… you know, and it’s dark, and so, he used to just sit outside on the porch, and play his guitar. I don’t know if you ever experienced sleeping…and hear one guitar just playing sweet music that just wake you up and like, ‘Oh, so sweet,’” Kaapana remembers. “Radio Hula” is one of the songs that Ledward Kaapana, along with his sisters Lehua Nash, Rhoda Kekona, and Lei Aken play in his Kaneohe garage on a rainy evening. They also share an energetic slack key performance of “Kuu Ipo Onaona,” and Ledward honors the late Dennis Kamakahi with “Kokee.”

 

NA MELE
Ledward Kaapana and Family

 

On most Friday evenings, slack key artist Ledward Kaapana gets together with his neighbors to share potluck dishes, laughter and music. For Ledward, it’s a tradition that goes back to his younger days in Kalapana on the island of Hawai‘i. “When I was growing up, we used to have kani ka pile…everybody sit down and enjoy, listen to music,” Ledward remembers. This special Na Mele features Ledward and his sisters Lei Aken, Lehua Nash, and Rhoda Kekona, playing their music in Ledward’s garage. Ledward’s falsetto voice leads off with “Nani,” and Lei, Lehua and Rhoda take vocal solos on “Kaneohe,” “Kalapana” and “Holei.” Sit back and enjoy!

 




AMERICA BY THE NUMBERS WITH MARIA HINOJOSA
Pass or Fail in Cambodia Town

 

Asian Americans are the best-educated and highest-income ethnic group in the United States. They are often referred to as the “model minority,” suggesting that all Asians are successful in school and in life. But Southeast Asian Americans have some of the lowest high school completion rates in the nation. Visit Long Beach, California – the city with America’s largest Cambodian community – to find out why this educational crisis is occurring and what people are doing about it.

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre

 

Join LINCOLN CENTER AT THE MOVIES as Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre showcases its spectacular range, diversity and artistry in this special presentation, which includes the company’s signature work, Revelations, along with three more pieces.

 


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