government

NOVA
Super Tunnel

 

Follow an army of engineers and designers as they tackle the complex challenge of building Crossrail, a massive new subterranean railway deep beneath the streets of London.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Happens to Hawai‘i Elders Who Don’t Have a Personal Safety Net?

 

Whether it’s job loss, illness, divorce or other life circumstances, some islanders find themselves at wit’s end, running out of money in retirement. What options do they have? And how are Hawai‘i taxpayers affected? What happens to Hawai‘i elders who don’t have a personal safety net?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Bargaining Power

 

White collar. Blue collar. Police. Firefighters. Nurses. Teachers. Scientists. These are just a few of the professions that make up Hawai‘i’s 14 collective bargaining units, representing thousands of State and County workers.

 

Union representatives are currently negotiating new contracts with the State government. What issues present the biggest challenge in these negotiations? Where did each side start and what progress have they made? The State of Hawai‘i Organization of Police Officers (SHOPO) and University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly (UHPA) are scheduled to join us for this edition of INSIGHTS.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


A Threat to Public Broadcasting’s “Spark”

Protect My Public Media

If you’d like to help support public media organizations like PBS Hawai‘i:

  1. Contact your Hawai‘i Congressional delegates.
  2. Go to ProtectMyPublicMedia.org and sign a petition.
  3. Continue to pitch in with your private dollars as you can.

Thank you


Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiAt first, when Ronald Reagan launched his Presidency in 1981, he didn’t like the idea of federal monies going to fund PBS and NPR stations across the country.

 

Then he saw how public-service media stations leveraged a relatively small amount of federal funding to gain private donations. One federal dollar might turn into, say, eight dollars, with citizens, businesses and charitable foundations adding the weight of their support.

 

“Government should provide the spark and the private sector should do the rest,” President Reagan said.

 

We at PBS Hawai‘i believe this is a good public-private partnership, centered on education, public safety and civic leadership. Last year, 9.5 percent of our revenues came from the federal investment.

 

Now comes the Trump Administration, signaling its intention to “privatize” – meaning de-fund – the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the private nonprofit that distributes funds to public media stations. Other Administration targets are the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

As I write this, two weeks before publication, I’m getting ready to go to Washington, D.C. for a national public media summit, at which attendees will seek to determine President Trump’s plans. Is he really going to wage a battle against federal seed money for public broadcasting?

 

The public broadcasting community says the notion of eliminating the federal funding in its mission is “nothing new.” It points out that similar ideas have been “soundly rejected on a bipartisan basis.”

 

According to the industry publication Current, the chair of a key House Appropriations subcommittee, Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), predicts that such a move would fail because “there is a strong constituency for public broadcasting in both the House and Senate.”

 

Indeed, strong bipartisan support usually results in an appropriation of about $1.35 per year per American. Still, leaders of public broadcasting say they must take funding threats seriously. They’re asking to talk with Administration officials, and station general managers from all over the country are taking their case to Capitol Hill.

 

PBS Hawai‘i’s Board of Directors already has written to Hawai‘i’s Congressional delegates.

 

However, America’s Public Television Stations (APTS) isn’t calling out and mobilizing citizens at this time. Without a fleshed-out proposal from the Trump Administration, leaders are monitoring the situation closely. We are urging viewers to register your support at protectmypublicmedia.org.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

FRONTLINE
Out of Gitmo

 

Produced in collaboration with NPR, FRONTLINE presents the dramatic story of a Gitmo detainee released from the controversial U.S. prison after 14 years, and the struggle over freeing prisoners once deemed international terrorists. Also in this hour, FRONTLINE works with Retro Report to explore the untold history of the Guantanamo Bay prison.

 

10 Buildings that Changed America

 

Geoffrey Baer hosts this survey of 10 influential buildings in a cross-country journey of American architecture. Meet the daring architects who imagined them and learn the stories of how they came to change the way we live, work, worship, learn, shop and play.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Oklahoma City

 

Follow the rise of the extremist militia movement, from Ruby Ridge to Waco, which led to the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in American history – the 1995 bombing by Timothy McVeigh that killed 168 people in Oklahoma City.

 

FRONTLINE
Trump’s Road to the White House

 

An investigation of how Donald Trump defied expectations to win the presidency. Through interviews with key players, the film shows how Trump rallied millions of supporters, defeated adversaries, and whom he’s bringing into the White House with him.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
A Conversation with Our Four Mayors

 

With a new year, newly seated City and County Councils across our state, and a new State legislative session, INSIGHTS welcomes Hawai‘i’s four mayors for this live conversation: Maui County’s Alan Arakawa, Oahu’s Kirk Caldwell, Kaua‘i’s Bernard Carvalho and Hawai‘i County’s Harry Kim. Among other topics, they’ll discuss increasing divisions across the island chain, and how each county can work together as part of a unified state.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I is a live public affairs show that is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, or Twitter during the broadcast. You may email us ahead of time toinsights@pbshawaii.org, or include the #pbsinsights hashtag when posting on Twitter.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 




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