Glass

CRAFT IN AMERICA
Nature

 

This edition celebrates the beauty, inspiration and future of the American landscape. Working with wood, glass and fiber as well as new materials, the artists profiled challenge viewers to reassess their relationship to the natural world. Throughout history, the colors, textures, shapes, as well as scents and tastes of the physical world have inspired artists to produce works of astonishing dimension and power. Featured artists include Patrick Dougherty, Mary Merkel-Hess, Michelle Holzapfel, Catherine Alice Michaelis and Preston Singletary.

 

Punahou glassblowing educator featured in national PBS arts series

PBS Hawaii

 

“CRAFT IN AMERICA: TEACHERS” PREMIERES SEPTEMBER 17 AT 8:00 PM ON PBS HAWAI‘I

 

HONOLULU, HI – A Punahou School educator is being highlighted on the season eight premiere of the Peabody Award-winning PBS series, “Craft in America.”Mark Mitsuda assists a student in the glassblowing studio at Punahou School. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Markley

 

Craft in America: TEACHERS premieres locally on PBS Hawai‘i on Saturday, September 17 at 8:00 pm.

 

Mark Mitsuda assists a student in the glassblowing studio at Punahou School. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Markley

 

The hour-long episode is a celebration of teachers – extraordinary individuals who are committed to their own artistic visions and are equally committed to sharing their skills and passion for craft with new generations of students and artists of all ages. Punahou glassblowing teacher Mark Mitsuda is among the artists and teachers from across the nation who are featured.

 

Mitsuda has been teaching the art of glassblowing at Punahou School since 1998, when his mentor, Hugh Jenkins, retired. Jenkins founded the glassblowing program at Punahou in 1972, using recycled milk and mayonnaise bottles as raw materials.

 

Mark Mitsuda has been teaching glassblowing at Punahou School since 1998. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Markley

 

Mark Mitsuda has been teaching glassblowing at Punahou School since 1998. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Markley

 

Underscoring the inter-generational mission of teaching, Mitsuda says that what he learned from Jenkins, he now passes on to his own students. “I feel fortunate to be teaching something that I feel passionate about and being able to inspire other people in the place that inspired me to first go into glassblowing,” he said.

 

After attending college in New York, Washington State and the University of Hawai‘i, Mitsuda co-founded Glass Design Group with two of his college classmates. His work is in numerous private collections, as well as the Hawai‘i State Foundation for Culture and the Arts.

 

This episode of “Craft in America” is a part of PBS’ Spotlight Education, a week of primetime programming that features reports from today’s classrooms.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.462.5030

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

A CRAFTSMAN’S LEGACY
The Glassblower

 

Host Eric Gorges visits a friend, April Wagner, a glassblower working in abstract art. Eric and April discuss the connection between making a sacrifice when starting up a business and the give-and-take that successful craft people must make and the rewards that eventually come. Eric learns how hot a glass studio can get and how to make a glass cup.

 

HOW WE GOT TO NOW WITH STEVENJOHNSON
Glass

 

Join best-selling author Steven Johnson to hear extraordinary stories behind remarkable ideas that made modern life possible, the unsung heroes who brought them about and the unexpected and bizarre consequences each of these innovations triggered.

 

Glass
Steven Johnson considers how the invention of the mirror gave rise to the Renaissance, how glass lenses allow us to reveal worlds within worlds and how, deep beneath the ocean, glass is essential to communication. He learns about the daring exploits of glassmakers who were forced to work under threat of the death penalty, a physics teacher who liked to fire molten glass from a crossbow and a scientist whose tinkering with a glass lens allowed 600 million people to see a man set foot on the moon. The link between the worlds of art, science, astronomy, disease prevention and global communication starts with the little-known maverick innovators of glass.