farming

INDEPENDENT LENS
Farmer/Veteran

 

A combat veteran starts a farm to help cultivate a healthier life outside the Army. While the sense of duty he once felt as a soldier returns, his crippling PTSD remains as he and his wife nervously anticipate the birth of their first child.

 

FRONTLINE
The Fish on My Plate

 

Journalist and author Paul Greenberg (Four Fish; American Catch) spends a year eating only fish. From farmed fish in Norway to the biggest wild fishery in the world off Peru, he travels to investigate the health of the ocean, as well as his own.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

 

In this new film, Professor of Anthropology Christine Yano explains, “If we want to know something of what some of these womenʻs lives were like…we could do no better than to listen to their own words, as expressed through song.” The women that Professor Yano is referring to are Japanese immigrants who worked in Hawai‘i’s sugarcane fields in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through their canefield songs, or holehole bushi, these women sang about their joys and sorrows of trying to start life in a new world. Hosted and narrated by ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, the film tells the story of music teacher Harry Urata, and his efforts to record, preserve and perpetuate these musical oral histories.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Seeds of Hope

 

Hawai‘i Island filmmaker Danny Miller’s documentary tells the story of Hawai‘i’s return to local and traditional methods of growing food. Through the voices of farmers, teachers, industry experts and community members, it covers traditional Hawaiian agriculture, pressures of urban development, the plantation legacy and solutions to the state’s growing food insecurity.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Sacred Hearts Academy

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Sacred Hearts Academy in the Kaimuki district of Honolulu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of Momi Robins-Makaila, a Waianae Intermediate School teacher who has written a book about the domestic abuse she has suffered in her life and the effect it had on her son. TitledCandy Canes and Coke, Robins-Makaila’s book chronicles her abusive relationships and her journey toward healing.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island show how teenagers bridge the generation gap by helping senior citizens navigate new technology; students at Kapolei High School on Oahu profile a teenager who does not let his Type 1 Diabetes get in the way of his passion for BMX bike racing; students at Kalaheo High School on Oahu uncover a World War II bunker in Windward Oahu and discover its unique, post-war uses; students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle reveal the challenges facing an upcountry Maui farmer and the difficulty of getting food from farm to table; students at King Intermediate School on Oahu feature a tattooed woman who discusses her experiences with workplace attitudes toward her body art; and students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School try to uncover a 101-year-old Kauai man’s secret to living a long and healthy life. 

 

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Nā Loea: The Masters

 

Meet two men who are considered masters in Hawaiian culture: Keone Nunes, a kumu hula (teacher of hula) and master of traditional kakau (tattooing), and Ed Wendt, a pioneer in the taro restoration movement who has helped to re-establish the water rights for all traditional farmers in east Maui.