dog

SHELTER ME:
Community Matters

SHELTER ME: Community Matters

 

This inspiring series celebrates the human-animal bond by telling uplifting stories about shelter pets and the people that help them. This episode, hosted by anthropologist Jane Goodall, features shelter dogs that are trained to protect endangered species. We follow the dogs from the day they are rescued to their deployment in Zambia where they are helping prevent the poaching of elephants and rhinos. Also: a high school cross country team takes shelter dogs for a run as part of their practice.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School, Kauai’s Search and Rescue Canine Team

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai report on Kauai’s Search and Rescue Canine Team. The story focuses on the training of rescue dogs from the time they are puppies and the qualities in puppies that reveal they might make good rescue dogs: curiosity, bravery, and a love of people. The story also highlights the special bond that forms between handler and rescue dog. The two become so close that they act together as one unit. Rescue dogs become an integral part of their handlers’ lives, and they usually live together. As one handler says, “We actually live in their (the dogs) homes. We just pay the mortgage.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului report on a gardening program on Maui that provides homeless youth with food and self-esteem.

 

Students from Ilima Intermediate School on Oahu show us how to make a traditional Maori dance implement.

 

Students from Island School on Kauai show us the inner-workings of a bio-mass plant on the Garden Isle.

 

Students at Waiakea High School in Hilo introduce us to the quirky, imaginative and liberating world of cosplay (costume play).

 

And from the HIKI NŌ archives, a story from Kapaa High School on Kauai about an adopt-a-dog-for-a-day program.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 25 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 26 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

NATURE
Pets: Wild at Heart: Playful Creatures

 

In this program filled with innovative photography and scientific revelation, we investigate how our favorite pets get in touch with their wild side through play. From talkative budgies, marathon-running hamsters, wall-climbing cats and diving dogs, discover how our pets’ playful games are just a whisker away from the wild.

 

NATURE
My Bionic Pet

 

The animals of the world may increasingly need our help with big issues like preserving habitat or species conservation. But sometimes individual animals need our help as well. Left disabled without fins, flippers, beaks or tails because of disease, accidents or even human cruelty, these unfortunate creatures need what amounts to a miracle if they are to survive. Amazing prosthetics made possible by the latest engineering and technology can provide just what they need, and scientists are finding that innovations created in the process are benefitting both animals and humans. Meet these inspiring animals and the remarkable individuals whose work has helped them live their lives again.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by James Campbell High School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by James Campbell High School in Ewa Beach in West Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu introduces us to P.E. for the 21st century. When students take physical education at this high-tech middle school on the Ewa plain, they don’t just play dodge ball or run laps around the track. We learn how their innovative P.E. program is using computer technology to help students get fit both physically and digitally.

 

Also Featured:
Maui High School on the Valley Island explores the challenges of designing schools to provide a healthy learning environment while keeping out intruders. Architect Charles Kaneshiro, president of Group 70 International based in Honolulu, shows the design elements he incorporated at Puʻu Kukui Elementary School in Wailuku, Maui, to provide “zones of supervision” throughout the multi-building campus.

 

On Hawaii Island, Hawaii Preparatory Academy students Mason Dupont and Jacob McCafferty researched, designed and created a remote-controlled boat that can be used to study marine life such as whales. The boat wasn’t created for a traditional class in engineering or science, but for a self-directed, independent study project.

 

Kapaa High School on Kauai tells us about a new program created by the Kauai Humane Society to encourage the adoption of dogs. Volunteers take dogs from the Kauai Humane Society on field trips to various places on the island to help them meet potential owners.

 

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama on Oahu takes us into a classroom that takes 21st century skills to a new level as students learn the intricacies of cell division, land ecology and geographical mapping through the popular video game, Minecraft. Students experience hands-on interaction with the land, exploration of their Hawaiian culture, and, of course, video gaming! The results: collaboration that combines creativity, communication, critical thinking – and a little bit of chaos.

 

Students of Kapaa Middle School on Kauai show us what makes their May Day program different from others in the state, and reveal what it takes to prepare for this beloved Hawaii tradition.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 4 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, July 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

NATURE
Dogs That Changed the World – Part 2

 

Thousands of years ago, as humans began to settle in villages, the wolf emerged from the wild and made the startling leap to “man’s best friend.” Once domesticated, dogs would accompany human cultures down through the centuries and to the far corners of the world. The Victorian Age transformed them into the most varied species, and one of the most common pets, on the planet. In the 21st century, dogs are once more changing our world by their use in cutting-edge scientific research and lifesaving medical care.

 

 

Martha Speaks

 

Martha Speaks is an animated series on PBS KIDS. Aimed at viewers between the ages of four and seven, Martha’s educational goal is to teach kids new words.

 

Based on the children’s book series by Susan Meddaugh and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, the series stars Martha, a beloved family dog. She is accidentally fed alphabet soup — this gives her the power of speech and the chance to speak her mind to anyone that will listen.

 

With two stories in each episode, kids will get to know Martha as an outspoken, honest, smart, confident dog who loves to eat (and talk!). They will also meet the rest of Martha’s family and friends. Ten-year-old Helen is Martha’s best friend. Martha encourages the shy, artistic Helen to be more outgoing and brave. Helen acts as the voice of reason for Martha. It’s a relationship any dog, or pet-lover, can appreciate.

 

The series is supported by an educational outreach campaign that includes a cross-age reading buddy program. The show is Closed Captioned and described for the visually impaired. It’s produced by WGBH Boston and Vancouver’s Studio B Productions.

 

Learning Goals

The goal of Martha Speaks is to increase oral vocabulary, the words we use when we talk. The shows are not trying to teach kids how to read. They are designed to help kids understand what words mean when they hear them; words likeretrievesprout, and crave. Vocabulary is one thing that predicts if children will be good readers. Once they are in school and they see these words, children will need to know what they mean. If children have heard the words before, that familiarity will help them as they learn to read. Martha Speaks is designed to teach up to 20 words in each show. And how better to get kids excited about learning and trying out new words than with a talking dog, who just can’t stop talking?!

 

 

Clifford the Big Red Dog

 

CLIFFORD, his human Emily Elizabeth and his dog pals Cleo and T-Bone introduce children to gentle lessons about being part of a community, acceptance and resolving differences. Clifford’s “every dog” kindness has made him and his book series enormously popular with parents and kids for almost 40 years.

 

Of course, Clifford wasn’t always a big dog. As true fans know, he started out as the runt of the litter. Clifford’s Puppy Days is a 25-episode prequel to Clifford The Big Red Dog, recounting Clifford’s days as a very small puppy. The show features new friends and an exciting urban setting.

 

For ages 4 and up.
Visit the Web site: http://pbskids.org/clifford
Series Goals
The series is based upon Clifford’s 10 Big Ideas:

 

  • Share
  • Be Responsible
  • Be Truthful
  • Be Kind
  • Believe in Yourself
  • Be a Good Friend
  • Have Respect
  • Help Others
  • Work Together
  • Play Fair

 

Throughout the series, these 10 Big Ideas are introduced and reinforced by different characters in different stories. The repeated presentations of these ideas make the most of young children’s need for and enjoyment of repetition.