disease

SPILLOVER –
Zika, Ebola & Beyond

 

Investigate the rise of spillover viruses like Zika, Ebola and Nipah that can make the leap from animals to humans. Find out how human behaviors spread diseases and what science can do to anticipate and prevent epidemics around the world.

 

A Royal Connection

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiBritain’s Queen Victoria, ruler of the most powerful nation in the world in her time, and Queen Emma of Hawai‘i, ali‘i of the most isolated archipelago, formed a friendship that bridged the long distance and the 17-year difference in their ages.

 

It was a friendship born of grief.

 

In the Hawaiian Journal of History, researcher Rhoda E.A. Hackler wrote about the queens’ 20-year, off-and-on correspondence.

 

Queen VictoriaQueen Victoria lost her husband and the father of their nine children when Prince-Consort Albert was just 42. The following year, the four-year-old son of Queen Emma and her husband, King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho), died of what was then described as “brain fever.” The child was named Albert, after Victoria’s husband.

 

Queen Victoria, still deeply mourning her husband’s death, reached out to Emma:

 

Queen Emma“As a mother you will understand how fully I am able to appreciate the depth of your grief…As a wife, I can sincerely hope that you may be spared the heavier blow which has plunged me into lifelong sorrow, but which makes my heart tenderly alive to all the sorrows of others.”

 

A year later, Emma wrote to Victoria:

 

“My heart is very, very heavy while I make known to Your Majesty that God has visited with me with that great trouble which in your kind and consoling letter you said you hoped I might be spared. On the 30th of November my Husband, of whose danger I had never entertained one thought, expired suddenly, almost while in the act of speaking to me, and it was a long while before they could make me believe that what I saw was death and that he had really left me alone for the remainder of my life.”

 

Victoria’s reply came quickly:

 

“…My bleeding heart can truly sympathize with you in your terrible desolation! A dear & promising only child & a beloved husband have both been taken from you within two years! Time does not heal the really stricken heart!..”

 

Two years after the death of Queen Emma’s husband, she traveled to England, raised money for the construction of the Cathedral of St. Andrew in Honolulu, and met Queen Victoria.

 

Victoria penned in her journal:

 

“Nothing could be nicer or more dignified than her manner…She was dressed in just the same widow’s weeds as I wear.”

 

Later in Emma’s trip, she was accorded the honor of being asked to spend the night at Windsor Castle.

 

Over the years, the queens shared personal news, much of it sad. Victoria lost a grandchild to diphtheria; Emma noted that typhoid fever was ravaging the Islands, killing “the young and the strong.”

 

Always, in this correspondence between royal “dear friends,” there is a sense of gratitude in being able to express profound loss and in being heard and understood.

 

NOVA
Can Alzheimer’s Be Stopped?

 

Alzheimer’s ravages the minds of over 40 million victims worldwide. Join scientists as they untangle the cause of this tragic illness and go behind the scenes of major drug trials to discover the therapies that may slow and even prevent the disease.

 

In Defense of Food

 

Join New York Times best-selling author Michael Pollan on a fascinating journey to answer the question: What should I eat to be healthy? Busting myths and misconceptions, Pollan reveals how common sense and old-fashioned wisdom can help us rediscover the pleasures of eating and at the same time reduce our risks of falling victim to diet-related diseases. Along the way, he shows how a combination of faulty nutrition science and deceptive marketing practices have encouraged us to replace real food with scientifically engineered “food-like substances.” And he explains why the solution to our dietary woes is in fact remarkably simple: “Eat Food. Not Too Much. Mostly Plants.”

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Climate Change

 

The University of Hawai‘i’s Sea Grant Program predicts Hawai‘i will become increasingly warmer and stormier, and will be at risk of more vector-borne and water-borne diseases, over the next few decades. The most drastic change may be the rise in sea levels, which scientists predict will be one to three feet higher by the time today’s infants reach retirement. What does all of this mean for Hawai‘i’s ecosystem and economy?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

NOVA
Vaccines: Calling the Shots

 

Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago – including whooping cough, measles and mumps – are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. Go around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations and discover the risks of opting out.

 

HIKI NŌ
Outstanding Stories from Winter Quarter

 

This look back at some of the outstanding HIKI NŌ stories from the winter quarter of the 2014/2015 school year is hosted by two former HIKI NŌ interns, Akane Kashiwazaki and Terrence Nahina, now students at the University of Hawaii Academy for Creative Media.

 

Featured in this compilation show are:
A story from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui about McKayla Wandell, who grew up with a meth-addicted father and now uses what she has learned from that experience to help other teens cope with similar hardships through her talks at Maui TEDx conferences; a story from Wheeler Middle School on Oahu about eighth-grader Macy Walters’ quest to climb to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro, despite (and because of) the fact that she suffers from a rare autoimmune disease; a report from Moanalua High School on Oahu about why Hawaii’s high school students consume so much caffeine; a personal profile from King Intermediate School on Oahu about Aisha Yamamoto, a King Intermediate seventh-grader who loves using her skills as a DJ to get kids moving on the dance floor; a point-of-view report from Hoku Subiono of Kua o ka La PCS Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy on Hawaii Island in which turns the lens on the controversial Thirty Meter Telescope project on Mauna Kea and his own struggles to reconcile his love of science with his Hawaiian heritage; a profile from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu about Shardenei Luning, a young woman who finds similarities between her lives as a beauty pageant contestant and Pop Warner football player; and from Campbell High School on Oahu, the story of dancer Christian Jacob Nguyen, who uses his art-form to cope with the trauma of his parents’ divorce.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 8 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Aug. 9 at 3:00 pm.
You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

OPERATION WILD
Part 3 of 3

 

Join veterinary teams around the world as they undertake groundbreaking operations to try to save animals’ lives. Find out how pioneering human medicine is transforming ways to look after animals in some of the most remote places on earth. Witness dramatic stories of ingenuity, invention and dedication.

 

Part 3 of 3
Witness extreme dentistry on a five-ton elephant. Find out if a remarkable invention can help a dolphin swim again. And see a Galapagos tortoise receive keyhole surgery.

 

OPERATION WILD
Part 2 of 3


Join veterinary teams around the world as they undertake groundbreaking operations
to try to save animals’ lives. Find out how pioneering human medicine is
transforming ways to look after animals in some of the most remote places on
earth. Witness dramatic stories of ingenuity, invention and dedication.

 

Part 2 of 3
See a rhino’s groundbreaking skin graft after poachers stole her horns and an
orangutan’s micro-surgery to try to restore her sight and her freedom.

 

OPERATION WILD
Part 1 of 3

 

Join veterinary teams around the world as they undertake groundbreaking operations to try to save animals’ lives. Find out how pioneering human medicine is transforming ways to look after animals in some of the most remote places on earth. Witness dramatic stories of ingenuity, invention and dedication.

 

Part 1 of 3
Learn whether an ingenious idea could help save giant pandas, and if an operation deep in the jungle can transform the life of a young gorilla. Watch as an elephant with a gunshot wound makes an extraordinary journey.

 

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