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HIKI NŌ
Episode #821

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Kinichi Ishikawa, a 98-year-old, 442nd Regimental Combat Team veteran who has been a farmer since the age of fourteen. Now nearing the century mark, Mr. Ishikawa farms taro at Waikoko Farms on Kaua‘i eight hours a day, rain or shine. Although he only finished grammar school, Mr. Ishikawa teaches the current owners of Waikoko Farms many valuable lessons in subjects such as long range planning.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Saint Francis School on O‘ahu tell the story of a successful ocean photographer who gives back to the community and the environment.

 

–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui show us how to tie a necktie with a Windsor knot.

 

–Students from Maui High School feature female students who are excelling in STEM-related subjects once dominated by males.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a teacher/professional bodybuilder who happens to be a single dad.

 

–Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu show how a deaf mother appreciates her son’s musical performances, even though she can’t hear them.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 10, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 11, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School, Joseph Kekuku

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School in Nanakuli on Oahu tell the story of Joseph Kekuku, the Native Hawaiian musician from Laie who discovered the Hawaiian Steel Guitar over 100 years ago. Legend has it that Kekuku accidentally dropped his comb on the strings of his guitar one day and liked what he heard. He then developed the sound and technique that became known as Hawaiian steel guitar. When he took that sound abroad it caught on and was one of the reasons why Hawaiian music enjoyed world-wide popularity in the 1920s and 30s. The story includes interviews with Kekuku’s grandson Uncle Joe Ah Quin and grandnieces Aunty Kaiwa Meyer and Aunty Gladys Pualoa-Ahuna.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kauai High School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a science-trained farmer who turned his love of the science of food into a thriving, family-run food truck.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai show us how to turn old, discarded crayons into colorful abstract art.

 

For a very different approach to art, we tap the HIKI NŌ archives to revisit a story from Iolani School on Oahu about a young conceptual artist/photographer.

 

Students from Kainalu Elementary School in Windward Oahu show us the therapeutic value of miniature horses for special needs children.

 

Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to a teacher who is dedicated to bridging the communication gap between the deaf and hearing communities through American Sign Language.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 4 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai tell the story of Joe Young, a retired police officer who is also a prostate cancer survivor. Mr. Young decided against traditional medical treatments, such as surgery and chemotherapy. Instead he changed his lifestyle and focused on doing things that make him happy. Through this approach and with the support of his family, Mr. Young is now cancer free.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island profile a driver’s education instructor who teaches teens the rules of the road to help prevent accidents and save lives.

 

Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Manny Mattos, a retired HPD officer who collects traditional Hawaiian war weapons and educates the public on conservation efforts to preserve the indigenous woods the weapons are made from.

 

From the HIKI NŌ archives: Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha on Kauai present a story about how a traditional Hawaiian hale (house) is built.

 

Students from Maui High School profile Chantal Sandoval, a deaf Junior Varsity cheerleader who explains that the biggest challenge for her is the social stigma attached to being deaf.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School in Keaau on the Big Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 26 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 27 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.