Cane

Lahaina: Waves of Change

LAHAINA: 
Waves of Change

 

In 1999, Hawaiian music legend and documentary filmmaker Eddie Kamae visited the West Maui town of Lahaina, only to find that Pioneer Mill, the center of Lahaina’s sugar industry. was closing down. Eddie knew that this signaled the end of Lahaina’s plantation era. a simpler, more innocent time that he remembered fondly from the childhood summers he spent in the area visiting his grandmother. He knew that a change as momentous as this needed to be documented so he filmed the last harvest, the last cane burning, and the final days of operation at Pioneer Mill. The time Eddie spent in this old Maui town also revealed many treasures from the past, both historical and personal. This documentary is dedicated to Shigesh and Sue Wakida, whose love for the children and Lahaina live on.

 

“This story is told in an intimate, highly personal style that is the hallmark of all Eddie Kamae’s films”
– Mark Vleth, Lahaina News

 

Source: hawaiianlegacyfoundation.org

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

 

In this new film, Professor of Anthropology Christine Yano explains, “If we want to know something of what some of these womenʻs lives were like…we could do no better than to listen to their own words, as expressed through song.” The women that Professor Yano is referring to are Japanese immigrants who worked in Hawai‘i’s sugarcane fields in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through their canefield songs, or holehole bushi, these women sang about their joys and sorrows of trying to start life in a new world. Hosted and narrated by ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, the film tells the story of music teacher Harry Urata, and his efforts to record, preserve and perpetuate these musical oral histories.