audio

NATURE
Owl Power

 

Using camera technology, computer graphics, x-rays and ultra-microscopes, take a new look at owls in more detail than ever before. The real stories behind how they hunt, how their vision and hearing work, and how they fly so silently are influencing 21st-century technology and design, from high-tech aircraft and submarines to innovative hearing aids.

 

Restoring Best Picture Quality

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture QualityWe’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiThe people of Hawai‘i bought us a $30 million new home. You provided us a forward-looking physical plant and the stability of property ownership.

 

And, of course, you now expect us to “bring it” with more and more quality content and higher and higher production values. That’s our expectation, too!

 

The last thing you want to see is reduced picture quality on shows that you love.

 

Understood. And yet, you may have experienced intermittent pixelation (that’s when individual pixels in a digitized image stand out) and sporadic, brief audio disruptions, all since PBS Hawai‘i moved into our new home with major, new technology systems.

 

First, I want to apologize to you for the blemishes in your viewing experience. Second, I’d like to explain. Third, I want you to know we have been working constantly, and repeatedly seeking help from network specialists, to eliminate the problems. And fourth, we have reason to believe that a solution is imminent.

 

As I write this, Level 3 Communications is arranging for a larger dedicated fiber circuit to transport our content. Level 3’s service to this local public television station repeatedly fell through the cracks following the telecom giant’s $5.7 billion acquisition of our previous provider, TW Telecom. We experienced critical delays as Level 3 worked to integrate TW Telecom into its fold and laid off staff. Level 3’s challenges in absorbing TW persisted as PBS Hawai‘i relocated to our new building and launched a long-planned transformation of our engineering model.

 

Our new model is something we’re excited about, because it allows us to spend less money to distribute our programming on today’s multiple media platforms – and frees up more resources for quality content. Our new systems rely upon dedicated access to an undersea, overland fiber optic network that runs through a Joint Master Control Center, called Centralcast, in Syracuse, New York. We’re creating programming expressly for Hawai‘i while sharing “back-office” tech costs with our PBS nonprofit peers.

 

Using this data highway shouldn’t have presented roadblocks in the Age of Fiber, but timing is everything: Our contracted fiber provider, TW Telecom, found itself going through a wrenching ownership transition. We sense that the layoffs may have resulted in a loss of institutional knowledge about projects already underway. For three months since our move to our new building, we experienced new owner Level 3’s lack of communication and responsiveness while our picture and audio quality suffered.

 

“This wasn’t managed properly. I don’t know why – we know how to do this. We’ll take care of it,” Level 3’s new Hawai‘i sales director Anthony Compiseno assured us when we met for the first time on August 8. He told us that we’d been assigned an unsuitable network setting – and arranged to test higher bandwidth capability (300mb or megabits per second, versus 200mb on our existing pipe), with a “pseudowire” enhancement to protect our broadcasting content. By the time you read this, our picture quality may already have returned.

 

You and other viewers have gone through this trying time of intermittent broadcast disruptions with us.

 

PBS Hawai‘i sends you our gratitude and aloha, for your patience and your continued faith in our programming.

 

We’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture Quality

 

Dick Cavett’s Vietnam

 

On the 40th anniversary of the official end of the Vietnam War, this program examines the war and its impact on America through the prism of interviews conducted by the iconic host of The Dick Cavett Show, which featured conversation and debate from all sides of the political spectrum. The program combines interviews from Cavett’s shows with archival footage, network news broadcasts and audio/visual material from the National Archives to provide insight and perspective on this controversial chapter of American history.

 

VOCES ON PBS
Now en Español

 

A fascinating look at a rarely seen side of Hollywood, this program follows the trials and travails of five hard-working Latina actresses who dub Desperate Housewives for Spanish language audiences in the U.S. With real lives that are often as dramatic and desperate as those of their onscreen counterparts, these dynamic women struggle to pursue their Hollywood dreams while balancing the responsibilities of paying rent and raising children. The film chronicles their lives as they audition for parts and work in the dubbing studio while striving for a career that offers more prominent – and on-screen – roles.

 

Na Mele

Traditions in Hawaiian Song. PBS Hawaii conceived and developed Na Mele to preserve Hawaii’s extraordinary music in its purest form – live and impromptu – as performed by some of our Islands’ best talent.

Teacher Resources

 HOW TO PRODUCE A HIKI NŌ STORY IN 15 EASY STEPS


Ready to produce a HIKI NŌ video? Here is a step-by-step list on how to do this. You’ll find the forms to complete and the video tutorials to watch as you produce your HIKI NŌ story, profile or franchise

 

1. HIKI NŌ PARTICIPANT RELEASE FORM
Students producing the video: Complete and submit the HIKI NŌ Participant Release Form.

 

HIKI NŌ TECHNICAL SPECS
2. For Camera

 

3. For Editing

 

4. Complete the appropriate pitch sheet:
HIKI NŌ SEASON 6 STORY PITCH SHEET
HIKI NŌ SEASON 6 PROFILE PITCH SHEET
HIKI NŌ SEASON 6 FRANCHISE PITCH SHEET

 

5. FRAMING AN INTERVIEW (2:44)
This tutorial covers the “do’s and don’ts” of framing an interview subject.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

6. PROPER AUDIO LEVELS (1:26)
A basic understanding of proper audio levels and the difference between analog and digital levels.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

7. AUDIO NOISE (3:35)
Do you think you can determine what noise is in your audio? Find out.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

8. SCRIPT TEMPLATE AND SAMPLE SCRIPT

 

9. STORY PREMISE (4:23)
Discover how a ‘story premise’ can help you in shaping your personal profile story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

10. 5-POINT OUTLINE (4:48)
Find out how creating a 5-Point Story Outline can help make a successful HIKI NŌ story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

11. SHOOTING A SEQUENCE (9:32)
Learn how to best shoot and utilize a video b-roll sequence in your story.
(Edited by Akane Kashiwazaki and narrated by Robert Pennybacker)

 

12. PACING (7:08)
This tutorial explains how to better pace your edits to achieve the proper mood and emotion for your story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

13. STANDARD OUTCUE (2:27)
Learn what a HIKI NŌ Standard Outcue is and why it’s important.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

14. UPLOADING YOUR FINAL STORY (2:48)
Is your story approved for air on HIKI NŌ? Then here’s how and where to upload it!

(Narrated by Kelsea Gines of Saint Francis School)

 

15. HIKI NŌ SUPERS & CREDITS LIST
Your last step is to complete the supers and credits form and select a still photo of your crew to run with the credits.