Student News

HIKI NŌ
Aloha Atlanta: HIKI NŌ at the 2016 Student Television Network Competition

 

This half-hour documentary captures the experience of Hawai‘i’s HIKI NŌ schools at a national digital video competition through the eyes of students from Kaua‘i’s Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School. The 2016 Student Television Network Competition took place in Atlanta, Georgia, and brought together thousands of middle and high school students from across the country to compete in time-intensive, deadline-driven contests in the production of news features, anchor presentations, short films, public service announcements and other forms of visual storytelling. Although the Chiefess students went to Atlanta with the intention of winning, the lessons they learned along the way, including teamwork, collaboration, grace under pressure, and the importance of friendship, were more valuable than the awards they took home. The Hawai‘i schools combined took home 34 awards and cheered for one another as one team (Team Hawai‘i) during the awards ceremony.

 

This program encores Saturday, Jan. 21 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 22 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Values Compilation

 

This episode is a compilation of stories that express the six Hawaiian values featured in the first round of the 2015-16 season. Here are the Hawaiian values featured and the stories that represent them:

 

Ho’omau (to persevere, perpetuate or continue) is represented by a story from Maui High School, which follows former UH Wahine Volleyball star Cecilia Fernandez as she battles Adenocarcinoma, a rare form of lung cancer. As a former athlete, Cecilia is used to battling opponents by following a carefully devised game-plan. But because so little is known about this disease, Cecilia must persevere against an enemy she is not familiar with – uncertainty.

 

Kuleana (responsibility) is represented by a story from Waianae High School in West Oahu. Waianae High School graduate and UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fighter Max Holloway feels it is his kuleana to represent the Waianae community in the most positive way possible when he competes. Max also takes his responsibilities to his wife and young son very seriously. Having been severely neglected by his own parents, Max wants to make sure his son does not have to suffer the same sort of childhood that he had.

 

Ha’aha’a (humbleness and humility) is represented by a story from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai. Kauai resident Moses Hamilton learned humbleness and humility when he had to start all over again after a car accident that left him a quadriplegic. While undergoing rehab, Moses took up mouth painting (painting by holding and manipulating the paint brush in one’s mouth), and is a now a successful artist who sells his paintings in Hanalei.

 

‘Imi na’auao (enlightenment and wisdom) is represented by a story from Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people – learning the culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

‘Ike Pono (to know what is right) is represented by a story from Maui Waena Intermediate School about Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often on the wrong side the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. He encourages his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods.

 

Mālama (to care for, protect and maintain) is represented by a story from Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu, about the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its community of volunteers to mālama the Hawaiian Monk Seal. Mālama is also represented by a video primer from Kauai High School on how to “take care” in the event of a hurricane.

 

This episode is hosted by HIKI NŌ alum (and current Political Science/ Communications double-major at UH Manoa) Shisa Kahaunaele.

 

This program encores Saturday, Jan. 7 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #807 – What I Learned

 

Viewers enjoy watching the final, PBS Hawai‘i approved versions of HIKI NŌ stories, but very few have any idea what the students go through to develop their stories to the point where they meet PBS Hawai‘i’s stringent on-air standards. This special episode explores the students’ learning processes by presenting four previously-aired HIKI NŌ stories, followed by behind-the-scenes “What I Learned” mini-documentaries on the experiences of the students who created the stories.

 

The stories featured (along with their corresponding “What I Learned” vignettes) include:

 

–A workspace created by and for students called The Canvas (pictured), from Kalani High School (O‘ahu);

 

–A blind performing arts teacher, from Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu);

 

–A Kaua‘i food truck entrepreneur, from Kaua‘i High School;

 

–A Navy-veteran amputee who is learning to live with pain, from Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu).

 

This special episode is hosted by Kalani High School Senior Anya Carroll and Hongwanji Mission School 7th grader Teo Fukamizu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #806

 

TOP STORY
Adults today bemoan the fact that members of the younger generation spend all of their waking hours on their smartphones. Young people from that very generation – students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i will surprise viewers with their video primer on “Ten Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone.” The activities they feature include making new friends, volunteering for a worthy cause, learning a new hobby – all things that take you away from the virtual world of your screen and into engaging with people face-to-face in the actual, physical world.

 

ALSO FEATURED
Students at Kapolei High School in Central O‘ahu tell the story of a school fun-run that was renamed to honor a teacher’s daughter who passed away from cancer.

 

Students at Konawaena High School in the Kona district of Hawai‘i Island tell the poignant story of a same-sex married couple whose love lives on after the tragic death of one partner.

 

Students from Radford High School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu tell the story of a football coach who makes life lessons a priority over winning.

 

Students from Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy in South Kona show us how to make unique t-shirt prints out of recycled materials.

 

And students from Kainalu Elementary School on the Windward side of O‘ahu show us how to use earthworms to make a nutrient-rich type of fertilizer.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Episode #805

 

TOP STORY
Students from Volcano Arts & Sciences School on Hawai‘i Island introduce us to environmental entertainer Dina Kageler. Ms. Kageler, herself a parent, uses music to teach students at Volcano Arts & Sciences about the natural wonders of the Volcano district of the Big Island. She also mounts an annual school musical that celebrates the flora, fauna and natural beauty of the area.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Saint Francis School in the Manoa district of O‘ahu feature a young entrepreneur who dedicated his innovative ice cream parlor –Lucy’s Lab Creamery – to his late “tiger mom” mother.

 

Students at Waiakea Intermediate School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island show viewers how to beat the heat by creating their very own traditional Japanese uchiwa fan.

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, explore how well- suited the soil at Maui’s HC&S sugar plantation will be for diversified agriculture once sugar production shuts down for good.

 

Students at Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu show us what it’s like to be home-schooled.

 

And students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu introduce us to a football coach who acts as a surrogate father to his players.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 17 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 18 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Episode #804

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Dustin Alfiler, Hanalei Fire Department captain, and the important role his family plays in balancing out his life. When he is off duty his family comes first, and he expresses how their commitment supports him in his often precarious and dangerous profession.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Wai‘anae Intermediate School tell the story of a former media student who finds purpose in his life as a media teacher at the Wai‘anae Boys and Girls Club.

 

Students at Kalani High School in East O‘ahu demonstrate how to make a thaumatrope – a simple device made from paper and string that creates rudimentary forms of animation.

 

Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu tell of youth involvement at the recent World Conservation Congress held at the Hawai’i State Convention Center. Their story includes an interview with U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell.

 

Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo introduce us to the hard-hitting, elbow-jabbing world of women’s roller derby.

 

And students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu introduce us to a young equestrian who has dedicated her life to the riding and care of horses.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 10 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 11 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #803

 

TOP STORY:
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui tell the story of Karina Bhattacharya, a young artist diagnosed with bi-polar disorder. Bi-polar disorder, also known as manic depression, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Although her condition has presented Karina with many challenges, she tries to keep a positive outlook. Studies have shown that one silver-lining of bi-polar disorder is its possible link to increased creativity. Karina feels that it has had a positive effect on her painting. “I could see everything the way it was,” says Karina, “and I even started noticing small details. I noticed that my paintings became more vivid. I use new colors…” The ability to express herself through her art has also helped Karina deal with her disorder.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young man who restored his religious beliefs by organizing musical events for a faith-based community organization.

 

Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy on O‘ahu demonstrate the steps involved in a traditional Buddhist incense ritual.

 

The journalists from Mililani Middle School in Central O‘ahu highlight the efforts of fellow students who are restoring ancient Hawaiian fishing areas around Mokauea Island in the airport industrial area.

 

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e show us the ins and outs of a bio-mass plant on the Garden Isle.

 

And the students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show us how a family that drag races together, stays together.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Episode #802

 

TOP STORY
Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawai‘i Island tell the amazing story of their school’s “Come Fly With Me” program that teaches middle school students how to pilot actual helicopters. The program takes students from classroom instruction (where they learn about the different parts of a helicopter and what they do) to actual flight-time. From the experience, students learn the value of remaining calm under pressure and how to think on their feet. The program is also used to get students to think about aviation as a possible career path.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–A student from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tells the very personal story of how her father, who lost his leg in a motorcycle accident, copes with intense pain every day.

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui feature a local teacher/writer who brings Hawai‘i’s plantation days back to life on the printed page.

 

–Students at Hawaii Technology Academy on O‘ahu demonstrate how to tie a bow-tie and, as a result, add some flair to one’s wardrobe.

 

–Students at Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kaua‘i tell us of their school’s special relationship with Saint Thomas University in Minnesota. And students from Hawaii Mission Academy on O‘ahu introduce us to the grandson of one of the most beloved Hawaiian cultural icons of all time: Mary Kawena Pukui.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 26 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Nov. 27 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #801

 

TOP STORY
Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu report on a phenomenon known to orthopedists as “text neck.” According to experts, bending one’s head down to text and perform other functions on one’s smartphone and other portable devices can lead to a deformity of the spine resulting in hunchback at the base of the neck and upper back. This story raises awareness of this growing problem and explores ways of diagnosing and preventing the condition.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui tell the story of a teacher who turned to her church to help cool down her 90-plus degree classroom.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i profile one of the state’s top junior lifeguards, who happens to be a thirteen-year-old-girl.

 

–Students from Waiakea Intermediate School on Hawai‘i Island show us the proper procedures for “hands only” CPR.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Kona side of Hawai‘i Island profile their recently retired, legendary athletic director, who has inspired many students over the past few decades.

 

–And students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to a photography teacher who passionately believes that photography is the universal language.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 1 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 2 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #720

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2015-16 school year. The show is hosted by Waianae High School Class of 2016 graduate and HIKI NŌ standout Crystal Cebedo, who will be attending Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship. Besides introducing seven outstanding stories, Crystal takes us on her HIKI NŌ journey – from her Waianae Intermediate School story about dealing with her mother’s terminal cancer, to learning leadership skills on her Waianae High School HIKI NŌ productions.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Opelu Fishing” from Kua o ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy on Hawaii Island: a look at traditional and sustainable Hawaiian opelu fishing in the remote South Kona fishing village of Milolii.

 

“K-9 Search and Rescue” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai: a feature on how Kauai’s canine search and rescue team takes the bond between man and man’s best friend to new heights.

 

“Hawaiian Steel Guitar” from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School in Nanakuli, Oahu: a history of the invention and promotion of the Hawaiian Steel Guitar by Joseph Kekuku of Laie, Oahu.

 

“Without Home” from Waianae High School in West Oahu: a look at a self-managed, self-governed homeless encampment in Waianae and how its residents have developed a broader, more universal definition of home.

 

“Haleakala Mules” from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui: a nuts and bolts look at how a mule team gets important environmental work done deep in Haleakala National Park.

 

“Laurie Rubin” from Hongwanji Mission School on Oahu: the story of accomplished singer, teacher and theatrical producer/director Laurie Rubin, who dispels many of the myths about how blind people (of which she is one) navigate through life.

 

“Life After Sugar” from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui: Conversations with two employees of Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. – the last sugar mill in Hawaii – whose upcoming closing will mark the end of the Hawaii’s sugar industry. The two employees, whose families have worked at HC&S for generations, reminisce about the past and speculate on their future.

 

This episode congratulates all 2016 High School graduates who participated in HIKI NŌ and recognizes each of them in the credits.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

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