Student News

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Ike pono

This episode is the fifth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘ike pono, which means to know what is right. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui Waena Intermediate School who feature Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often in trouble with the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. His motivation for opening the business was not to make money, but to provide his family and community with healthy snacks, to employ people who need a helping hand (like he did), and to encourage his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods. “I went from someone who wasn’t doing Maui any good to someone who is making a difference,” says Cousins.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sosefina Matautia, once a self-professed bully at Waianae Intermediate School, decided to do the right thing and change her ways. While becoming a kinder, better person benefitted those around her, Sosefina was motivated to change because of her own dreams of someday becoming a doctor.

 

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui): Led by math teacher Debi Davis, Seabury Hall Middle School students do the right thing for the less fortunate by weaving colorful yarn hats that are distributed around the world to help brighten the lives of underprivileged children.

 

Kealakehe High School (Hawaii Island): Students and other community members in Kona do the right thing by banding together to build Habitat for Humanity homes for families on the Hawaiian Homes wait list.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): Sometimes doing what you know is right requires great sacrifice. Sometimes doing what is right means doing less for yourself. Such is the case with Waianae High School student Daisy Agae, whose grades suffer because she has to take care of her two younger brothers, one of whom is a special needs child born with debilitating medical conditions.

 

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (Hawaii Island): Hawaii Island resident William ”Black” Abraham was headed down the wrong path as a young adult, until he decided to do the right thing and dedicate his life to saving lives. He did so by becoming an Ocean Safety Officer at Hapuna Beach and is now inspiring the next generation of lifesavers through his Junior Lifeguard training program.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui High (Maui): An East Maui couple do the right thing by taking in and caring for animals with debilitating and life-threatening illnesses. As a result, their home has become the East Maui Animal Refuge, more affectionately known as the Boo-Boo Zoo. This episode is hosted by Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #823

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge, in which production teams from HIKI NŌ schools took the challenge of creating stories on the theme Mālama Honua (Taking Care of Our Island Planet) over three days. The theme – which is based on the mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s world-wide voyage – was revealed to the students at the beginning of the three-day production time limit.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu present their interpretation of Mālama Honua in a story about Veronika Sumyatina, a foreign exchange student from war-torn Ukraine who finds a new home, and the meaning of aloha, at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School. Veronika explains that home is much more than a roof over one’s head – home is “where your heart is.” By accepting an outsider as one of their own, the Nānākuli students do their part in taking care of our island planet.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu feature a female angler whose love of fishing is matched only by her respect for the eco-system from which she partakes.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu follow a woman who volunteers to mend and replace the pedestrian walking flags that keep people safe when crossing the very dangerous Farrington Highway.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature the OSPCA, a non-profit organization that cares for abandoned and neglected cats and dogs.

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu follow a group of motivated community members who are cleaning up Kawainui Marsh in Kailua.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Upcountry Maui show how recycling is a way of life on their campus.

 

–Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu follow the eco-friendly phenomenon of Hydro Flasks.

 

This episode is hosted by Hali‘amaile Kealoha and Hulukoa Nunokawa, both seniors at Kamehameha School Kapālama.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 24, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 25, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #824

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2016-2017 school year. The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Mochi Pounding” from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui:
The story of a Maui family who continues their annual New Year’s tradition of mochi pounding, despite the recent passing of the family matriarch.

 

“Tough Vice-Principal” from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu:
A classic “don’t judge a book by its cover” story about a vice-principal whose tough exterior belies her heart of gold.

 

“Fashion Entrepreneurs” from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu:
Two Honolulu-based fashion entrepreneurs mentor young local designers who are trying to break into the business.

 

“Tie-Dye Artist” from Kalani High School in East Honolulu:
Inspired by 1960s cultural icons like The Beatles, a Honolulu teenager launches her own line of tie-dye clothing.

 

“Diabetic Athlete” from Waiakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island:
A star high school athlete faces his toughest opponent off the court: Type 1 Diabetes.

 

“Pedestrian Walking Flags” from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu:
A woman takes it upon herself to sew red flags that are held up by pedestrians as they cross the notoriously dangerous crosswalks in Waiʻanae. The red flags go a long way in alerting drivers that there are pedestrians crossing in front of them.

 

“The Fact of You” from Kaua‘i High School in Lihue:
A personal essay about identifying one’s authentic nature and remaining true to it.

 

“Ukrainian Student” from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School in West O‘ahu:
The story of a foreign exchange student from Ukraine who embraces and reciprocates the Aloha Spirit she finds in Nānākuli.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Moanalua High School student Camryn Tabiolo, who will be entering her school’s HIKI NŌ program in the fall of 2017.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 1, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 2, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #822

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tackle the controversy surrounding commercial dolphin tours. On August 23, 2016, NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) published a regulation prohibiting tour boats from being within 50 yards of a spinner dolphin, including swimming with them. This regulation has caused a major downturn in business for ocean tour companies such as Sea Hawaii, which claims it has seen a 90% decrease in revenues since the ruling was put into effect.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–Middle school students from Island School on Kaua‘i teach us how to make a puka shell necklace.

 

–Students from Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu tell us about a camp for the siblings of young cancer patients.

 

–Students from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu introduce us to education innovator Ted Dintersmith.

 

–In their HIKI NŌ debut, students from Highlands Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how to salsa dance.

 

–Students from President William McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of a McKinley alumnus and banker who has dedicated a great deal of his life to America’s pastime.

 

–Students at Wai‘anae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu report on a new program on their campus designed to get kids to show up for school.

 

–And the students at Kalani High School in East Honolulu feature a young tie-dye designer who channels the spirit of the 1960s in her clothing line.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 17, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 18, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #821

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Kinichi Ishikawa, a 98-year-old, 442nd Regimental Combat Team veteran who has been a farmer since the age of fourteen. Now nearing the century mark, Mr. Ishikawa farms taro at Waikoko Farms on Kaua‘i eight hours a day, rain or shine. Although he only finished grammar school, Mr. Ishikawa teaches the current owners of Waikoko Farms many valuable lessons in subjects such as long range planning.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Saint Francis School on O‘ahu tell the story of a successful ocean photographer who gives back to the community and the environment.

 

–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui show us how to tie a necktie with a Windsor knot.

 

–Students from Maui High School feature female students who are excelling in STEM-related subjects once dominated by males.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a teacher/professional bodybuilder who happens to be a single dad.

 

–Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu show how a deaf mother appreciates her son’s musical performances, even though she can’t hear them.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 10, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 11, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #820

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu tell the story of Jimmy Lee, an eighty-six year old O‘ahu resident who witnessed the attack on Pearl Harbor when he was an eleven-year-old boy. Images of the planes and the bombing are etched in Lee’s memory. Even today, when Lee looks up at the sky in the Pearl Harbor area he can “see the planes and hear the bombing.” Lee uses his vivid memories to teach school children about the event that launched the U.S. into World War II and changed his life forever. He also volunteers as a guide for the National Park Service to share his vivid memories with visitors.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Waiakea High School in the Hilo area of Hawai‘i Island tell the story of an athlete whose most formidable opponent is his own case of Type 1 Diabetes.

 

–Students from Montessori School of Maui in Makawao show us how to make a stress ball out of balloons.

 

–Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu follow a piano teacher’s long journey to fulfilling her life’s purpose.

 

–Students from Island School on Kaua‘i find out how foreign exchange students at their school compare life in Germany to life in Hawai‘i.

 

–Students from Ke Kula Ni‘ihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kaua‘i tell the story of how their new principal – a native of Ni‘ihau – finally agreed to take on the responsibility of running their school.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 3, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 4, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #819

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu present a story on the Hawai‘i-themed artwork engraved on the columns of O‘ahu’s rail project. The column art was designed by local architect Daniel Kanekuni and, according to HART spokesperson Bill Brennan, adds a sense of place and local identity to the rail project. Rail proponents and opponents alike feel that the column artwork is a good thing. However, some rail opponents, such as UH Professor of Civil Engineering Panos Prevedouros, feel that the real eye-sore will be the elevated rail stations. Says Prevedouros, “How much lipstick do they think they can put on that pig?”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School show how a Kahului family’s mochi- pounding tradition continues, despite the recent loss of the family matriarch who had been the heart of the event.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Technology Academy in Leeward O‘ahu show us the proper way to pack a military care package.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island profile a Konawaena graduate who went on to form the internationally renowned heavy metal reggae band Pepper.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a lesbian couple at their school who work to spread the joy of diversity and the message of tolerance for those who are different.

 

–Students from Maui High School profile a star athlete who had to sit out the football season because of a heart condition but continued to inspire his teammates by volunteering as an assistant coach.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 27, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, May 28, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #818

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e introduce a new story genre to HIKI NŌ: the Personal Essay. In her essay “The Fact of You,” Kaua‘i High School student Haven Luper-Jasso explores the nature of truth. It opens with her thoughts on the matter: “The word FACT can be defined as a true piece of information. And in our day and age where information and messages are bombarding us from every angle every second of the day, that’s all we really want in life: truth.”

 

She goes on to explore not just the nature of factual truth, but also the truth within one’s own self: “Your life is the greatest masterpiece you will ever produce…Let it be genuine, true to who you are. Because that is who you were created to be. And that is a fact I can guarantee with a hundred percent certainty.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Waipahu High School on O‘ahu explore the mysterious origins of their studentbody-wide cheering tradition known as the Arthur Awards.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu uncover the caring person behind the tough façade of their vice principal.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Team Unify, a non-profit organization that helps students without disabilities bond with students who have disabilities.

 

–Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu introduce us to two local fashion designers who give younger, up-and-coming designers hands-on experience in the fashion business.

 

–Ka‘ala Elementary School on O‘ahu makes its HIKI NŌ debut with a video primer on aquaponics. (Ka‘ala Elementary School is only the second elementary school to produce for HIKI NŌ. The first was Kainalu Elementary School in windward O‘ahu.)

 

This program encores Saturday, April 8, at 12:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

Hawai‘i students shine at national video competition

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Donalyn Dela Cruz
Hawaii State Department of Education
Donalyn_Dela_Cruz@hawaiidoe.org
808.586.3232

 

Download this Press Release

 

Island schools nab 20 percent of
Student Television Network awards

 

Hawai‘i students shine at national video competition Island schools nab 20 percent of Student Television Network awards

A contingent of Hawai‘i schools took home 20 percent of the 196 prizes awarded at this year’s Student Television Network Convention, March 28-31 in Anaheim, CA. Photo: John Allen III/Searider Productions

 

State of Hawaii Department of Education seal logoHONOLULU – Students from Hawai‘i schools returned to the Islands with 20 percent of the 196 total awards given out at the 14th annual Student Television Network (STN) Convention in Anaheim, CA, held March 28-31. The complete list of Hawai‘i results begins below on this page.

 

All but one of the Hawai‘i schools that took home awards are public schools. Kamehameha Schools Maui, which won two awards, was the sole Hawai‘i private school in attendance. All of them participate in PBS Hawai‘i’s HIKI NŌ student news network.

 

Approximately 3,000 middle and high school students from across the U.S. gathered to compete in on-site, time-restricted contests in video journalism, television production, filmmaking, music videos, commercials, and public service announcements.

 

As in the last few STN competitions, the number of awards won by Hawai‘i schools was notably high in comparison to states with larger populations, such as California, Florida and Texas.

 

Two neighbor island middle schools led the Hawai‘i awards count – Kaua‘i’s Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School and Maui Waena Intermediate School, with seven awards each. Veteran student video production high schools Moanalua and Wai‘anae took home wins in major overall categories.

 

“Without a doubt, the stellar performance by Hawai‘i schools at STN is due to the work our schools have done with HIKI NŌ and PBS Hawai‘i,” said Kevin Matsunaga, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School media teacher and STN regional board member. “Our Hawai‘i media teachers have worked tirelessly, as well, and the outstanding work their students have done at these competitions is proof that HIKI NŌ is making a huge difference in the lives of our students.”

 

“HIKI NŌ offers students the ideal preparation for this national competition and it also readies them for different professional paths – by teaching them to work their way through challenges and deliver quality work on tight deadlines,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO.

 

“This national recognition is yet another testament of the quality work being produced by our HIKI NŌ students and the dedication of their media teachers and mentors,” stated Kathryn Matayoshi, Hawaii State Department of Education Schools Superintendent. “These opportunities would not be possible without the commitment and partnership with PBS Hawai‘i. The teamwork and use of technology needed to create these quality productions align with the Department’s mission to help our students connect with their communities and be lifelong learners.”

 

2017 Student Television Network – Hawai‘i Winners:

^back to top

 

CONVENTION RE-CAP

1st Place – Moanalua High School

2nd Place – Waipahu High School

Honorable Mention – Maui High School

 

SPOT FEATURE—MIDDLE SCHOOL

2nd Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School

3rd Place – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

 

MOVIE TRAILER—MIDDLE SCHOOL

2nd Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School

Honorable Mention – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

 

“TELL THE STORY”

Honorable Mention – Waiakea High School

Honorable Mention – Wai‘anae High School

 

NAT. SOUND PACKAGE—MIDDLE SCHOOL

1st Place – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

Honorable Mention – Maui Waena Intermediate School

 

NAT. SOUND PACKAGE—HIGH SCHOOL

Honorable Mention – Moanalua High School

Honorable Mention – Wai‘anae High School

 

COMMERCIAL—HIGH SCHOOL

3rd Place – Moanalua High School

 

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT—HIGH SCHOOL

1st Place – Maui High School

3rd Place – Moanalua High School

Honorable Mention – McKinley High School

 

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT—MIDDLE SCHOOL

2nd Place – Wai‘anae Intermediate School

3rd Place – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

Honorable Mention – Maui Waena Intermediate School

 

WEATHER REPORT—HIGH SCHOOL

2nd Place – Kapolei High School

 

SILENT FILM—MIDDLE SCHOOL

3rd Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School

Honorable Mention – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

 

ACTION SPORTS—HIGH SCHOOL

Honorable Mention – Kamehameha Schools Maui High

 

ANCHOR TEAM—MIDDLE SCHOOL 

3rd Place – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

 

MUSIC VIDEO—MIDDLE SCHOOL 

2nd Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School

Honorable Mention – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

 

CRAZY 8s BROADCAST NEWS MAGAZINE—MIDDLE SCHOOL

1st Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School

2nd Place – Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle

3rd Place – Wai‘anae Intermediate School

 

CRAZY 8s BROADCAST NEWS MAGAZINE—HIGH SCHOOL

Honorable Mention – Wai‘anae High School

 

CRAZY 8s SHORT FILM DOCUMENTARY—HIGH SCHOOL

3rd Place – McKinley High School

 

CRAZY 8s SHORT FILM FICTION—MIDDLE SCHOOL

2nd Place – Ewa Makai Middle School

3rd Place – Wai‘anae Intermediate School

 

FILM EXCELLENCE BEST WRITING

Waipahu High School

 

FILM EXCELLENCE BEST EDITING

Moanalua High School

 

FILM EXCELLENCE BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Moanalua High School

 

FILM EXCELLENCE BEST ANIMATION

Wai‘anae High School

 

MONTHLY BROADCAST EXCELLENCE AWARD

Wai‘anae High School

 

THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards
Part Two

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ features highlights from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards live-streamed announcements of the winners.

 

On Saturday, March 11th, the results of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards were announced by PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā in a four-island, closed-circuit, live-stream awards show originating from the PBS Hawai‘i studio on O‘ahu. HIKI NŌ teachers and students from the nominated schools gathered at their respective locations to watch the announcements: Paliku Theatre at Windward Community College on O‘ahu; McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center on Maui; the Kaua‘i Marriott Resort on Kaua‘i; Honua Studios in Kona; and the Waiakea High School library in Hilo. Each time an award was announced, the teacher and students from the winning school came onstage to accept their award from a PBS Hawai‘i Board member: a bronze medal for third place, silver for second place and gold for first. Gold medalists also won a $1,000 gift card to purchase equipment for their school’s media program.

 

This episode picks up where we left off in last week’s show by featuring the medal-winning schools (and their projects) for Best Franchise Piece, Best Factoid, Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing, Best Overall Story Middle School Division, and Best Overall Story High School Division.

 

This program encores Saturday, April 1 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, April 2 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

1 2 3 7