HIKI NŌ

HIKI NŌ
Facing the Future

 

This half-hour documentary by filmmaker Stuart Yamane examines a new phase in the evolution of the nation’s first statewide student news network. Four years after the launch of HIKI NŌ, a new dream has transpired:  to develop HIKI NŌ as a sanctioned class within Hawaii’s statewide school system, and into a curriculum available to public, private and charter schools. Thanks to funding from the Stupski Family Fund of the Hawaii Community Foundation, PBS Hawaii has the resources needed to realize this dream. Teachers, students, curriculum developers, education evaluators, media professionals and leaders from the Department of Education and PBS Hawaii share their vision for what this new curriculum will look like and how it will work – charting a course into a new education frontier.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Island School, Lihue

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Island School from Lihue, Kauai.

 

Top Story:
Kealakehe High School on Hawaii Island presents a story about students from their school and from Iolani School on Oahu who were selected to participate in a once-in-a-lifetime science project that will send NASA’s dust shield technology to the moon. These robotics students, called MoonRIDERS (Research Investigating Dust Expulsion & Removal Systems), will work with the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems in hands-on experiments testing the capabilities of NASA’s EDS (Electrodynamic Dust Shield). Students will build a mock up lunar lander spacecraft, fabricate the actual flight frame for the mission, mount the EDS on it, install a camera and design a lunar re-duster, then test the entire system on the lower slopes of Mauna Kea to see how well it will remove dust off of the camera lens.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai visit Hanapepe Nights, a popular art, music and food festival in Kauai’s biggest little town. Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of a husband and wife who left their careers as mechanical engineers to farm the very colorful, exotic dragon fruit on Maui. Students from McKinley High School on Oahu profile their school’s cross-country team captain, Hidemasa Vincent Mitsui, who was deemed ineligible to compete during his senior year because he had to repeat the 9th grade when he moved from Japan to Hawaii (OIA rules state that a 5th year student is ineligible to participate in high school sports). Even though he was not able to compete, Vincent inspired his teammates to do their very best and was eventually reinstated when his coach and athletic director appealed to the OIA.

 

Students at Iolani School on Oahu take us behind the scenes with the Iolani Hackers, a group of students and faculty members who create elaborate visual pranks meant to surprise and delight people on campus. Students at Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Isabel Villanueva, the state air riflery champion who excels at the sport despite the fact that she lives with a rare medical condition – linear scleroderma – which causes her physical pain while participating in the sport. Students at Wheeler Middle School on Oahu show us how to stay safe on the internet by using proper social media etiquette and guidelines.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 2 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
The first all-Middle School edition

 

This episode is the first all-Middle School edition of HIKI NŌ.

 

Top Story
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui tell the story of their experience at the 2015 Student Television Network conference and video competition in San Diego, California, where they learned that it is far better to give than to receive. Although the primary purpose of their trip was to participate in the video competition, they also spent a great deal of time volunteering for worthy San Diego-based causes. Maui Waena students cleared half an acre of weeds and invasive plants from Balboa Park, the largest urban park in San Diego. They also served meals to 300 homeless people at the city’s largest homeless shelter, Father Joe’s Village. The Maui Waena students went on to win several awards at the competition, but they consider their hours of community service as the most rewarding part of the trip.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu report on the sometimes frightening transition from Middle School to High School.

 

Students from Waipahu Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of a diabetic teacher at their school who is educating others about the disease.

 

Students at Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui profile their marching band director Richie Franco and his unconventional journey from the tough streets of Chicago to teaching music in Makawao, Maui.

 

Students at Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of a student with a limp brought on by a medical condition that made her a target for bullies. With the support of friends and her own upbeat outlook, she is now moving forward to a positive future.

 

Students at Kapaa Middle School on Kauai invite us to their school’s Electives Night – a unique evening of student art and performances that excites not only students and their parents, but the entire community as well.

 

Students at Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui tell the story of a special garden on campus that is encouraging teachers and students alike to take their lessons outdoors.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 30 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 31 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School on the north shore of Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Why Are There So Many Mexican Restaurants in Kapaa?
Kapaa High School on Kauai explores why there are so many Mexican restaurants – 9, to be exact – in their small town of Kapaa, where there is only one Starbucks. In spite of the availability of so much Mexican food, restaurant owners don’t feel that they are in competition with each other as they offer regional specialties from Mexico that distinguish their offerings. Besides the popularity of Mexican food, the increasing Mexican population in Hawaii may be a reason for the proliferation of restaurants.

 

Also Featured:
Punahou School’s Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau Sails on Hokulea
Middle school students at Punahou School on Oahu feature their teacher, Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau, who recently sailed to New Zealand on Hokulea’s Malama Honua worldwide voyage. Kaniela’s mother was among Hokulea’s original crew, which instilled in him at a young age deep values for the ocean and how important it is to take care of each other.

 

Two Ladies Kitchen in Hilo
Waiakea High School on Hawaii Island visits Two Ladies Kitchen, which serves up over twenty flavors of mochi. The shop started with a family recipe and seven flavors and has grown, making it a popular stop for locals and visitors alike, and where kitchen staff have become family.

 

Pohole Salad A Hana Specialty
Hana K-12 School in East Maui shares how to make pohole salad, a popular dish in Hana that’s served at community gatherings and special events. It’s made from the pohole fern that grows in patches around Hana.

 

Master Storyteller Thomas Cummings
Kalani High School students in East Honolulu feature Uncle Tom Cummings, who has been telling stories for over forty years, weaving Hawaiian culture, mythology, history and values into tales that he started learning as a child. He captivates audiences using objects and “stuff” to illustrate his storytelling.

 

Na Hoku Hano Hano Award Winner Mark Yamanaka
Mid Pacific Institute students in the Manoa district of Oahu had an opportunity to interview award winning Hawaiian musician Mark Yamanaka and listen to his musical stylings. Yamanaka shares one of the biggest challenges of his life – not being of Hawaiian ancestry and wanting to play Hawaiian music.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 16 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 17 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

PBS Hawaii to Receive National Endowment for the Arts Grant

Press Release Header

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact: Emily Bodfish
Email: ebodfish@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1169

 

HONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawaii will be receiving a $20,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for its statewide student news network, HIKI NŌ.

 

This is the second round of grants the NEA has announced for fiscal year 2015 which includes 1,023 awards totaling $74.3 million nationwide. The NEA’s grant making program promotes opportunities for people in communities across America to experience the arts and exercise their creativity.

 

NEA Chairman Jane Chu said, “The NEA is committed to advancing learning, fueling creativity, and celebrating the arts in cities and towns across the United States. Funding these projects like the one from PBS Hawaii represents an investment in both local communities and our nation’s creative vitality.”

 

“We are thrilled to receive this recognition from the NEA,” said Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS Hawaii. “HIKI NŌ is the only statewide student digital literacy program of its kind in the country. By tapping into students’ innate storytelling skills, HIKI NŌ is encouraging Hawaii’s youth to share their unique voices. And the results have been remarkable. This NEA grant will help PBS Hawaii strengthen this 21-st century learning initiative.”

 

HIKI NŌ is made up of 90 public, private and charter schools from across the islands. Through the production of video news stories about their schools and communities, students gain valuable workforce and life skills, while teachers engage their students in hands-on, collaborative learning.

 

To join the Twitter conversation about this announcement, please use #NEASpring2015. For more information on projects included in the NEA grant announcement, go to arts.gov

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Download this Press Release

 

HIKI NŌ
hosted by Kaiser High School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Kaiser High School in East Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake district of Oahu presents a story on Moanalua history teacher Cris Pasquil, who uses non-traditional activities like group projects, skits and even music to instill a love of learning in his students. He draws inspiration from his own experience learning hula under kumu hula Robert Cazimero and his halau’s recent victory at the esteemed Merrie Monarch Festival.

 

Also Featured:
H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui profiles 2014 Baldwin graduate Marcus Chambers, who has already achieved success as a surf videographer. What started off as a hobby for Marcus has led to nominations at international award competitions, thanks to the growing importance of video and social media in the world of professional surfing.

 

Waipahu High School on Oahu features a follow-up story on Victoria Cuba. We first met Victoria last season as a senior at Waipahu High School, when she opened up about being homeless. Now, she attends the University of Hawaii at Manoa on a full scholarship and interns at PBS Hawaii. No longer homeless, she resides in a UH dorm, but admits that the transition has had its challenges.

 

Waianae High School in West Oahu tells us about a new mode of transportation for some of their campus staff. With 40 acres and nearly 2,000 students to care for, Waianae High School’s security guards have a lot of ground to cover. The department recently acquired bicycles as a healthier, more cost-effective mode of transportation. The change is slowly spreading throughout the school.

 

Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island shows how their school is developing one of only two high school lacrosse teams on the island. Konawaena teacher Daniel Curran is on a mission to make lacrosse a mainstream sport in Hawaii. Starting a team has many unique challenges, but students say the benefits are worth it.

 

Mililani Middle School in Central Oahu profiles the rock band EMKE.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 20 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, June 21 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

Hawaii schools dominate national television competition

STN Hawaii group

 

HONOLULU, HI – Hawaii’s middle and high school media programs took home 28 awards from the 12th Annual Student Television Network Convention in San Diego, California. The complete list of winners from Hawaii, including links to available videos, starts on the next page.

 

Waianae High School took home six trophies, including a regional Broadcast Excellence award. Maui Waena Intermediate School, another big winner, also garnered six awards. Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai, and Oahu schools Mid-Pacific Institute, Moanalua High School and Waianae Intermediate School also won multiple awards. Kauai’s Waimea High School also captured a first-place win in the “60-Second Silent Story” category.

 

“Hawaii schools have proven once again that they can compete with anyone across the nation in digital media,” said Kevin Matsunaga, media instructor at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School and a member of STN’s national board. “The students’ performance here is proof positive that our Hawaii digital media teachers and students are doing great work.”

 

More than 2,700 middle and high school students from across the country gathered at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego for four days of competition and workshops. Students were given strict time deadlines, often only a few hours, to conceptualize, write, shoot and edit their entries on site. In the “Crazy8s” competitions, for example, students completed four-minute newscasts or films in eight hours. Teachers were not allowed to help.

 

All Hawaii schools that attended STN are also participants in PBS Hawaii’s HIKI NŌ learning initiative. In this statewide program, students learn workforce and life skills through the creation of video news stories. These stories air Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. on PBS Hawaii.

 

PBS Hawaii presented a workshop at the conference, Learning by Re-doing: The HIKI NŌ Process. Students and teachers from across the U.S. learned about the HIKI NŌ production process, and Hawaii students shared their experiences in the program.

 

“Programs like HIKI NŌ are helping our students to be better storytellers,” Matsunaga said.

 

“Our growing pipeline of Creative Media across the state of Hawaii is like no other,” said Candy Suiso, Executive Director of Waianae High School’s Searider Productions media program. “What a great feeling.”

 

Hawaii Winners at the 12th Annual Student Television Network Convention

Broadcast Excellence, South Pacific Region
Waianae High School

 

Best Live Action Film
Waianae High School

 

Convention Recap
First Place: Waianae High School view video here >>
Second Place: Moanalua High School view video here >>

 

Middle School Spot Feature
First Place: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School
Third Place: Waipahu Intermediate School

 

Middle School Movie Trailer
First Place: Maui Waena Intermediate School

 

Tell the Story
Second Place: Waianae High School view video here >>

 

Middle School PSA
First Place: Maui Waena Intermediate School
Third Place: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School
Honorable Mention: Waianae Intermediate School
Honorable Mention: Mid-Pacific Institute

 

High School PSA
First Place: Waianae High School view video here >>

 

60-Second Silent Story
First Place: Waimea High School
Honorable Mention: Moanalua High School

 

Commentary
Third Place: Kauai High School

 

Middle School Anchoring Team
Honorable Mention: Mid-Pacific Institute
Honorable Mention: Maui Waena Intermediate School

 

Middle School Music Video
Third Place: Maui Waena Intermediate School
Honorable Mention: Maui Waena Intermediate School
Honorable Mention: Waianae Intermediate School

 

High School Music Video
Second Place: Moanalua High School

 

Crazy 8s – Middle School Broadcast Journalism
Honorable Mention: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School view video here >>

 

Crazy 8s – High School Multimedia Journalism
Third Place: Waianae High School
Honorable Mention: Maui High School

 

Crazy 8s – Middle School Short Film
First Place: Maui Waena Intermediate School
Honorable Mention: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School view video here >>

 

Crazy 8s – High School Short Film – Live Action
Honorable Mention: Moanalua High School

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Oahu schools

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is the program’s first-ever all-Oahu show.

 

Top Story:
Students from Campbell High School profile Christian Jacob Nguyen, a Campbell High junior whose love of dance carried him through difficult times that included the divorce of his parents. As a member of the 96706 Dance Squad, Christian has found his passion and forged a second family.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Ewa Makai Middle School highlight how their Physical Education program is using computer technology to help students get fit both physically and digitally; students from Kapolei High School feature members from their school and from Waipahu High School partnering on a program that teaches special education students a valuable vocational skill; students from Hawaii Mission Academy cover the creation of a mural at Kahuku High School that illustrates the dangers of methamphetamine use; students from Waialua Intermediate & High School spotlight the Mauli Ola Foundation, which gives children with cystic fibrosis a fun-filled and therapeutic ocean experience; students at Waipahu Intermediate School profile Bryson Manuel, a Waipahu eighth-grader with a passion for drawing; and students at Kalani High School tell the story of Riley Kishiba, an athlete-turned-robotics whiz who competed at the Japan Super Science Fair.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is being hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui profile Kathryn Peterson, who has volunteered to help in the training of assistance dogs since she was 10 years old. The Seabury Hall senior is passionate about the service that assistance dogs provide for people with disabilities, enabling them to lead more independent and fulfilling lives.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School on Oahu share the story of their school principal, Alvin Parker, who served as a crewmember on the Aotearoa (New Zealand) leg of Hokulea’s World Wide Voyage, helping to promote the message of malama honua, or caring for the Earth; students from Kapaa High School on Kauai capture the lively activities that abound at their town’s monthly street fair; students from Kamehameha Schools Kapalama High School on Oahu feature Imiah Tafaovale, a Kamehameha sophomore who finds a convenient way to forgo the long school commutes that were robbing her of sleep; students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island document the creation of a community mural that showcases the cultural values of West Hawaii; students from Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island tell the story of Thomas “Tom Tom” Pahio, a Waipio taro farmer whose loi, or taro patches, serve both as an outdoor classroom for students and as test beds for taro varieties that can resist new environmental threats.

 

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