Health

HIKI NŌ: Maui teen with Tourette Syndrome returns to public school with confidence

Press Release Header

 

HIKI NŌ episode 709: Bristyl, a Maui Teen that suffers from Tourette Syndrome.

After a year of being home-schooled, a Maui teen with Tourette Syndrome re-enters public school with more confidence. This report from Maui High School students will be featured on HIKI NŌ, premiering Thursday, January 21 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawaii.

 

Bristyl Dempsey, 13, was diagnosed with the neurological disorder while she was in intermediate school. Classmates teased Bristyl because of her tics, and one teacher thought she was intentionally misbehaving in class.

 

Because of these difficulties, Bristyl’s mother had her home-schooled for a year. Bristyl’s symptoms improved through therapies such as meditation. Upon returning to public school, Bristyl aspires to be a cheerleader.

 

Ewa Makai Middle School students on West Oahu host this episode, which will also feature these stories:

 

  • Students from Mid-Pacific Institute in Honolulu profile ukulele phenom Jody Kamisato, who chose the high risk/high reward route of opening his own music school over the option of being an employee of someone else’s school.
  • Students from Wheeler Middle School on Central Oahu offer tips on how to prepare an emergency kit in the event of a hurricane.
  • Students from Kalani High Schoolin East Honolulu introduce us to The Canvas, a student designed, student run work/play space in Kalihi.
  • In keeping with the theme of students creating their own venues of expression, we take a look at a past HIKI NŌ story from Maui Waena Intermediate Schoolabout a high school student who created a youth version of TEDx, global events that promotes “ideas worth spreading.”
  • Students from Kapolei High Schoolon West Oahu tell the story of a youth volunteer at the Oahu Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, a no-kill animal shelter.

 

This episode will be posted online after the broadcast premiere: pbshawaii.org/hikino

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release
Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

NOVA
Vaccines: Calling the Shots

 

Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago – including whooping cough, measles and mumps – are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. Go around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations and discover the risks of opting out.

 

Easy Yoga for Arthritis with Peggy Cappy

Easy Yoga for Arthritis with Peggy Cappy

 

Air date: Mon., Aug. 17, 8:00 pm

 

Discover how yoga can come to the aid of anyone, regardless of age, who wants to increase strength and mobility. Yoga is both a natural weight-bearing exercise that builds strength and a low-impact way to work wonders for balance. Peggy Cappy, whose gentle yoga approach has helped many reduce stress and create greater comfort and ease in body, mind and spirit for more than 40 years, shows how yoga poses can increase range of motion, improve awareness of the body and help keep the metabolism running efficiently.

 

FRONTLINE
The Trouble with Chicken

 

FRONTLINE investigates the spread of dangerous pathogens in our meat – particularly poultry – and why the food-safety system isn’t stopping the threat. Focusing on an outbreak of salmonella Heidelberg at one of the nation’s largest poultry processors, the episode shows how contaminants are evading regulators and causing more severe illnesses at a time when Americans are consuming more chicken than ever.

 

Caring for Mom & Dad

 

Americans are living longer than ever before, and soon older adults will outnumber the young. Today, family caregivers are providing 90 percent of parent care, in addition to balancing work and family, a job most cannot afford to do. This phenomenon is faced by millions of baby boomers who are approaching retirement themselves, and who are also grappling with the responsibilities of one or both of their parents’ care. The program explores the emotional, health and financial challenges that many caregivers face every day and offers some solutions and tips to help others embarking on this new future.

 

FRONTLINE
Outbreak

 

FRONTLINE presents the vivid, inside story of how the Ebola outbreak began and why it wasn’t stopped before it was too late. With exclusive access to key global decision-makers and health responders, and gripping accounts of victims from the slums of Monrovia to the jungles of Guinea, the episode exposes tragic missteps in the response to the epidemic.

 

TWICE BORN
Stories from the Special Delivery Unit Part 2


Part 2 of 3

Witness groundbreaking fetal surgery in this miniseries that takes an intimate, inside look at the Special Delivery Unit at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where rare surgeries are performed on babies inside the womb. With exclusive access to the elite unit, experience rarely seen, real-time footage of operations on fetuses. Join expectant parents who face a gut-wrenching decision: Should they take a leap of faith to repair birth defects with pre-natal surgery, even if it means they could lose their child? Gain insight into the lives of an unusual team of doctors who have defied skeptics and chosen to pursue this high-risk, high-reward career path.


Part 2 of 3
Doctors remove the remainder of newborn Lilly’s tumor, while Tina and Brion receive devastating news about their unborn twins. As Shelly and the baby undergo a procedure to repair the fetus’s spine, get a close-up look at this surgery on a baby in the womb.

 

CANCER: THE EMPEROR OF ALL MALADIES
A Conversation

Katie Couric moderates a roundtable conversation featuring Ken Burns; Sharon Percy Rockefeller, President and CEO of WETA and a cancer survivor; and Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the book upon which the film is based.

CANCER: THE EMPEROR OF ALL MALADIES
Finding the Achilles Heel

CANCER: THE EMPEROR OF ALL MALADIES

Produced by Ken Burns and directed by Barak Goodman,  tells the comprehensive story of cancer, from its first description in an ancient Egyptian scroll to the gleaming laboratories of modern research institutions. The film is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Siddhartha Mukherjee, M.D.
The six-hour, three-part film interweaves a sweeping historical narrative with intimate stories about contemporary patients, and an investigation into the latest scientific breakthroughs that may have brought us, at long last, within sight of lasting cures.

 

Finding the Achilles Heel

Scientists believe they have cracked the mystery of the malignant cell and the first targeted therapies are developed, with the promise of many more to follow. But very quickly cancer reveals new layers of complexity and unforeseen defenses. In the disappointment that follows, many call for a new focus on prevention and early detection as the most promising fronts in the war on cancer. But other scientists are undeterred, and by the second decade of the 2000s their work pays off. This episode follows patients Doug Rogers, a 60-year-old NASCAR mechanic with melanoma, and Emily Whitehead, a six-year-old child afflicted with leukemia – both pioneers in new immunotherapy treatments.

 

CANCER: THE EMPEROR OF ALL MALADIES
The Blind Men and the Elephant

Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, a film by Ken Burns

CANCER: THE EMPEROR OF ALL MALADIES

Produced by Ken Burns and directed by Barak Goodman, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies tells the comprehensive story of cancer, from its first description in an ancient Egyptian scroll to the gleaming laboratories of modern research institutions. The film is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Siddhartha Mukherjee, M.D.


The six-hour, three-part film interweaves a sweeping historical narrative with intimate stories about contemporary patients, and an investigation into the latest scientific breakthroughs that may have brought us, at long last, within sight of lasting cures.

 

The Blind Men and the Elephant


Richard Nixon declares “war on cancer” in 1971. Flush with optimism and awash with federal dollars, the cancer field plunges forward in search of a cure. In the lab, rapid progress is made in understanding the essential nature of the cancer cell, leading to the revolutionary discovery of the genetic basis of cancer. But at the bedside, where patients are treated, few new therapies become available, and a sense of disillusionment takes hold, leading some patients and doctors to take desperate measures. It is not until the late 1990s that the advances in research begin to translate into more precise targeted therapies with the breakthrough drugs Gleevec and Herceptin. The film intertwines the story of Dr. Lori Wilson, a surgical oncologist who is diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in 2013.

 

1 2 3 4