Education

Most Likely to Succeed

 

Most Likely to Succeed examines how the current American educational system was established in 1893 – a system that’s remained a standard in schools, while the economy has made dramatic shifts due to technology. The film highlights High Tech High School, a San Diego charter school that uses hands-on, project-based curricula, and serves as a model for what’s possible, as communities across the country attempt to re-imagine education for now and the future.

 

2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS NOMINEES

HIKI NŌ Awards Nominees March 23, 2017

 

The 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards

PBS Hawai‘i recognizes exceptional storytelling skills of middle and high school students throughout our Islands who participate in HIKI NŌ, our statewide digital learning initiative and student news program.

 

We are pleased to announce this year’s nominees for the HIKI NŌ Awards. The nominees were chosen from HIKI NŌ shows that aired during the 2015-2016 school year and the Fall Semester of this current school year. You can view each nominated piece by clicking on its name in the list below. (You can also watch the nominated projects, by category, Thursdays at 7:30 pm, Saturdays at noon, and Sundays at 3:00 pm on PBS Hawai’i.)

 

Find out who the winners are by watching our special 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards Show, Thursday, March 23 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i. Best of luck to the nominees – and mahalo to all the students, teachers and mentors who help make HIKI NŌ a success in our public, private and charter schools throughout Hawai‘i.

 


 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Homeschooled Student”

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Moses Hamilton”

Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu) – “Laurie Rubin”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Joe Young”

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “John Plunkett”

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Bipolar Artist”

James Campbell High School (O‘ahu) – “Miracle Baby”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Marc Unites”

Mid-Pacific (O‘ahu) – “Ukulele Hale”

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Living With Pain”

 

BEST WRITING — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Front Office”

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “K-9 Search & Rescue”

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui) – “Feed My Sheep”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Love Laundry”

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui) – “Airconditioning”

Mililani Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Mokauea Island”

 

BEST WRITING — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kapolei High School (O‘ahu) – “Best Buddies Basketball”

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Biomass”

Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy PCS (Hawai‘i Island) – “Opelu Fishing”

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “Text Neck”

Saint Francis School (O‘ahu) – “Lucy’s Lab Creamery”

Waiakea High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Cosplay”

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Dog Wheelchair”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Firefighter”

Ka Waihona o Ka Naʻauao PCS (O‘ahu) – “Steel Guitar”

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “Haleakala Mules”

Wai‘anae Intermediate School (O‘ahu)– “A Home For Larenzo”

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Life After Sugar”

Kapa‘a High School (Kaua‘i) – “Iloreta Brothers”

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “A Love Story”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Deaf Cheerleader”

Waiʻanae High School (O‘ahu) – “Without Home”

 

BEST FRANCHISE PIECE

Hana K-12 (Maui) – “Ti Leaf Print”

Kalani High School (O‘ahu) – “Thaumatrope”

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “10 Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone”

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Hurricane Protection”

Moloka‘i High School (Moloka‘i) “Text-A-Tip

Pacific Buddhist Academy (O‘ahu) – “Offering Incense”

 

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY & EDITING

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Junior Lifeguard”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Tourette”

Moanalua High School (O‘ahu) – “Equestrian”

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “IUCN”

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Parental Guidance Required”

 

BEST FACTOID

Hana K-12  (Maui) – “School History”

Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy (Hawai‘i Island) – “Solar Trees”

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Wildcats”

Mililani High School (O‘ahu) – “Red Dirt”

President William McKinley High School (O‘ahu) – “School Spirit”

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Living Your Dying

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS: Living Your Dying - Rev. Mitsuo “Mits” Aoki, a pioneer of Hawaii’s hospice movement.

 

Rev. Mitsuo “Mits” Aoki, a pioneer of Hawai‘i’s hospice movement and founder of the University of Hawaii School of Religion, passed away in August 2010. This film from 2003 highlights his own transformative near-death experience; his therapeutic work with terminally-ill cancer patients; the death of his wife Evelyn; and thoughts about his own mortality. For over 40 years, Rev. Aoki attempted to take the terror out of dying, and showed others how to experience death as not just the end of life, but as a vital part of life, as well.

 

For inquiries about “Living Your Dying” email the Mits Aoki Legacy Foundation at:
MitsAokiLegacy@hawaii.rr.com

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #808 – Teachers of the Year

 

Of the eight Hawai‘i Department of Education District Teachers of the Year for the 2016-2017 school year, two are HIKI NŌ teachers: Luane Higuchi from Wai‘anae Intermediate School (Leeward District), and Jennifer Suzuki from Maui Waena Intermediate School (Maui District). Both teachers discuss what the District Teacher of the Year honor means to them, and the impact HIKI NŌ has had on them and their students.

 

This program encores Saturday, Jan. 14 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 15 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #807 – What I Learned

 

Viewers enjoy watching the final, PBS Hawai‘i approved versions of HIKI NŌ stories, but very few have any idea what the students go through to develop their stories to the point where they meet PBS Hawai‘i’s stringent on-air standards. This special episode explores the students’ learning processes by presenting four previously-aired HIKI NŌ stories, followed by behind-the-scenes “What I Learned” mini-documentaries on the experiences of the students who created the stories.

 

The stories featured (along with their corresponding “What I Learned” vignettes) include:

 

–A workspace created by and for students called The Canvas (pictured), from Kalani High School (O‘ahu);

 

–A blind performing arts teacher, from Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu);

 

–A Kaua‘i food truck entrepreneur, from Kaua‘i High School;

 

–A Navy-veteran amputee who is learning to live with pain, from Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu).

 

This special episode is hosted by Kalani High School Senior Anya Carroll and Hongwanji Mission School 7th grader Teo Fukamizu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


AMERICA BY THE NUMBERS WITH MARIA HINOJOSA
Pass or Fail in Cambodia Town

 

Asian Americans are the best-educated and highest-income ethnic group in the United States. They are often referred to as the “model minority,” suggesting that all Asians are successful in school and in life. But Southeast Asian Americans have some of the lowest high school completion rates in the nation. Visit Long Beach, California – the city with America’s largest Cambodian community – to find out why this educational crisis is occurring and what people are doing about it.

Becoming an Artist

Becoming an Artist. Baryshnikov mentors students in their endeavors as artists.

 

Enjoy an inspiring tribute to the power of mentoring and the vital role it plays in passing on our artistic cultural heritage from one generation to the next. The documentary features acclaimed artists across the disciplines, including Mikhail Baryshnikov, Robert Redford, Rosie Perez, Bill T. Jones, Frank Gehry, John Guare and Kathleen Turner working with some of the nation’s most talented students selected by the National YoungArts Foundation. BECOMING AN ARTIST is a celebration of our cultural vitality and the need to ensure its continuance.

 

Can-Do Teachers

Can-Do Teachers: Teachers at PBS Hawaii - Terrance T.C. Ching Campus

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiA Hawaiian proverb tells us:

To prepare for 1 year, plant kalo.
To prepare for 10 years, plant koa.
To prepare for 100 years, teach the children.

Here at PBS Hawai‘i, count us in for the third option!

 

Our programming for all ages is designed to nourish minds, and Hawai‘i teachers are very much a part of this educational television/multimedia center.

 

About 80 digital media teachers from all over the state – private, public and charter school educators – recently met for a workshop in our cheerful new building. These professionals are teaching and learning at the same time, preparing their students for the future in a fast-changing world.

 

The teaching connection at PBS Hawai‘i is baked in. Our very first general manager was a teacher at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Robert M. Reed, who established this organization in the 1960s to show the value of television as a teaching aid.

 

Several chapters of the Hawai‘i Alpha Delta Kappa organization of women educators have long served as volunteers here, overseeing young keiki and students at our events and handling paperwork. ADK members and tireless retired teachers Jean Kiyabu and Julie Shimonishi have served on our Board of Directors.

 

Another Board member is the extraordinary Candy Suiso of Wai‘anae High School, who many years ago set the stage for PBS Hawai‘i’s HIKI NŌ statewide student news network, by sharing digital media with her students. They became engaged learners and continue to be a potent force in creative youth media, locally and nationally.

 

Thanks to generous funding from former San Francisco educator Joyce Stupski and her Stupski Family Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation, we are able to provide the schools’ HIKI NŌ teachers with storytelling mentors and training in journalism and video production.

 

It was a retired public elementary school teacher, Honolulu’s Karen Watanabe, who actually completed our building campaign by leaving us a large gift when she passed away at age 89. She loved math and liked to play the markets.

 

Leeward O‘ahu’s Teacher of the Year, the innovative Luane Higuchi of Wai‘anae Intermediate, has written a letter urging islanders to invest in children through PBS Hawai‘i.

 

We’re most grateful and very proud to stand alongside Hawai‘i’s teachers in planting a “can-do” spirit and learning and workforce skills, in preparing children for the future.

 

A hui hou – until next time…
Leslie signature

 

TED TALKS
Education Revolution

 

Explore innovative approaches to education with hosts writer Baratunde Thurston and actress Sara Ramirez. Speakers, including playwright and actress Anna Deavere Smith and educator and entrepreneur Sal Khan, discuss the school-to-prison pipeline, micromanaging kids and turning struggling students into scholars.

 

This program will rebroadcast Fri., Sept. 16, 11:00 pm

 

NOVA
School of the Future

 

In a new age of information, rapid innovation and globalization, how can we prepare our children to compete? Discover how the new science of learning can help us re-imagine the future of education for all children. In a series of compelling personal profiles of students and teachers, the film looks at the consequences of widespread inequities that often create gaps in opportunities and educational achievement, and explores innovative attempts to narrow those gaps. NOVA visits neuroscientists, psychologists and educators with new insights revealing how kids’ brains work – including how stress, sleep, mindset and emotions affect learning; what role technology should play in the classroom; and which techniques are most likely to engage and inspire growing minds.

 

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