Culture

CURIOUS TRAVELER
Curious Kotor

CURIOUS TRAVELER: Curious Kotor

 

This series takes viewers on an enriching and entertaining “field trip for grown-ups” to some of the most intriguing cities in Europe and North America. Journalist Christine Van Blokland brings her passion and genuine curiosity about the arts, quirky characters, storytelling and lifelong learning to this new series. In each location, Christine explores the hidden histories in their art, architecture, museums, monuments, houses of worship and city parks.

 

Curious Kotor
Christine visits Montenegro and asks: Why is there a beautiful, tiny blue-domed church floating in Kotorska Bay? Why did someone build 1350 steps up the side of Kotor’s mountain? Why is The Cathedral of Saint Tryphon pink? Why are the streets within the fortress walls intentionally designed as a maze?

 

NA MELE
The Leo Nahenahe Singers

 

“Leo nahenahe” is Hawaiian for “soft and sweet.” Now in their eighties, The Leo Nahenahe Singers celebrate over 50 years of performing together on this episode of NA MELE. Ethelynne Teves on guitar, Noelani Mahoe on ukulele and Mona Teves on upright bass accompany their instruments with their soft and sweet vocals. These Na Hoku and Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame honorees perform Hawaiian classics like “Hanohano Wale No” and “Koni Au I Ka Wai.”

 

AMERICAN EPIC
Part 3 of 3: Out of the Many, the One

 

Travel the country in search of unknown 1920s artists, when the music of ordinary Americans was recorded for the first time, transforming music forever, in a three-part film narrated by Robert Redford.

 

Part 3 of 3: Out of the Many, the One
Explore the origins of various regional music genres. Joseph Kekuku, regarded as the inventor of the steel guitar, is at the center of the Hawaiian slack key story. This episode also traces the hybrid cultures evident in Tejano music, along with stories behind Cajun music and the music of the Hopi tribe.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Biography Hawai‘i: Joseph Nāwahī

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS Biography Hawaii: Joseph Nawahi

 

This documentary tells the story of Hawaiian patriot Joseph Nāwahī, a teacher, surveyor, lawyer, cabinet minister, newspaper editor and artist in Hawaii who lived from 1842 to 1896. Nāwahī founded the anti-annexation political party Hui Aloha ‘Aina and died a political prisoner deemed treasonous by the American- controlled Republic of Hawaii.

 

GLOBE TREKKER
Top 10 South American Adventures

 

Trekkers Ian Wright, Holly Morris, Elis Nevitt, Matt Young, Megan McCormick and Zay Harding travel all across South America – to Guyana, Venezuela, Columbia, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Paraguay and Brazil – in search of the continent’s Top 10 adventures, which include white water rafting in untamed waters, searching for giant anaconda snakes, trekking to the world’s highest waterfalls, and climbing to the snow-capped summit of the Lanin Volcano in the Andes Mountains.

&nbsp

NA MELE
Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr.

NA MELE Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr.

 

This special NA MELE presentation pairing Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr. has a special significance, as both are the sons of Hawaiian music icons: slack key guitar legend Gabby “Pops” Pahinui and Peter Moon Sr., a seminal figure in the Hawaiian Renaissance of the 1970s.

 

Cyril and Peter Moon Jr.’s master-apprentice process is rooted in the “old style” approach to teaching: watch, listen and learn. That was how Cyril learned from his father, and this technique has borne fruit with Peter Moon Jr. as the two of them, along with special guest Jeff Ahoy on steel guitar, perform in a jam session at the PBS Hawaii studio.

 

CURIOUS TRAVELER
Curious Bordeaux

 

CURIOUS TRAVELER takes viewers on an enriching and entertaining “field trip for grown-ups” to the most intriguing places in the world. This isn’t your typical what-to-do-on-vacation travel show. It’s an all-access pass to the “who, what, where” and “how did they do that?” of the world’s best art, architecture and hidden histories.

 

Bordeaux
Who got hitched at Bordeaux Cathedral and why was it such an important moment in history? Did Parisian architecture actually come from Bordeaux? Why is Bordeaux so synonymous with wine? What was the Place de la Bourse hiding? What do all these sculptures mean at Place des Quinconces? Why were two ancient gates spared?

 

PBS Hawai‘i to air documentary on late Hawaiian history professor, activist

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

PBS Hawai‘i to air documentary on
late Hawaiian history professor, activist

 

Kū Kanaka/Stand Tall premieres June 15 at 8 pm on PBS Hawai‘i

 

Kū Kanaka/Stand TallKanalu Young, center, was in the front line of the 1993 ‘Onipa‘a March in Honolulu, which commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Hawaiian Kingdom overthrow. Photo: Ed Greedy

 

HONOLULU, HI – A half-hour documentary about the late University of Hawai‘i Hawaiian history professor, Kanalu Young, is set to make its statewide broadcast premiere on PBS Hawai‘i. Kū Kanaka/Stand Tall premieres Thursday, June 15 at 8 pm on PBS Hawai‘i’s local film showcase, PBS Hawai‘i Presents.

 

A live discussion about the film will take place on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i at 8:30 pm, following the broadcast premiere of Kū Kanaka/Stand Tall.

 

The documentary traces Young’s story, starting with his fateful dive at age 15 near Diamond Head. The accident paralyzed him from the neck down, with limited use of his hands and arms.

 

In rehab, he went through a period of rage. According to Kū Kanaka/Stand Tall filmmaker Marlene Booth, Young eventually chose a new path. “Kanalu makes a decision that you’re in rehab to not give up,” Booth said. “That makes all the difference.”

 

In 1970s Hawai‘i, when the Hawaiian Renaissance was taking root, Young would turn his passion toward learning Hawaiian language, history and culture. In the mid-90s, Young earned a PhD in Pacific Island history and began his career as a Hawaiian history professor at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. During his studies, Young participated in demonstrations, including the 1993 ‘Onipa‘a march in Honolulu that commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Hawaiian kingdom overthrow.

 

Booth says that Young’s personal experience with trauma gave him insight into the trauma experienced by the Hawaiian community. “I think he felt that the Hawaiian movement gained strength by acknowledging trauma, acknowledging loss, and moving forward to recovery,” Booth said. “I think he felt that understanding history, re-asserting language, and publicly celebrating culture, was really very important to cultural and national renewal.”

 

Booth, who co-produced the documentary Pidgin: The Voice of Hawai‘i with Young shortly before his passing in 2008, said that Young was “both a gentle man and a warrior.”

 

“In these times, I think he would say that there is strength in knowing who you are and knowing the various parts of yourself, especially for Native Hawaiians,” Booth said.

 

“I think about him all the time and what he would be making of our times now. And I think he would say, “No give up.”

 

To view the full interview, click here.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Ever the Land

 

This film explores the sublime bond between people and their land. For the past 150 years, the relationship between the Tūhoe Maori tribe and the New Zealand government has been defined by longstanding grievances over severe colonization experiences. The film captures a period of change in 2014, when the Tūhoe’s ancestral homelands were returned, the New Zealand government issued an official apology, and the Tūhoe built the first-ever “Living Building” in New Zealand as a testament to their values and vision of self-governance.

 

1 2 3 12