Culture

Pacific Heartbeat

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT, now in its sixth season, is an anthology series that provides viewers with a glimpse of the real Pacific – its people, cultures and contemporary issues.  The series features a diverse array of programs that will draw viewers into the heart and soul of Pacific Island culture.

 

Pacific Heartbeat Season 6 premieres in May 2017 on PBS Hawaiʻi.

 

A co-presentation of Pacific Islanders in Communications and PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Visions in the Dark: The Life of Pinky Thompson

Saturday, May 6, 2017, 8 pm

Visions in the Dark: The Life of Pinky Thompson is a Hawaiian story of pain and promise, of challenge and triumph and a story of leadership.  Sustaining a serious eye wound in Normandy during WWII that left him in the dark for two years, Myron “Pinky” Thompson emerged with a clear vision of his purpose in life.  Thompson would go on to be a social worker, mentor and revered leader in the Native Hawaiian community who left a legacy of positive social change, pride in Pacific heritage and a strong sense of native identity among Hawaiians that flourishes today.

 

Ever the Land

Saturday, May 13, 2017, 8 pm

Ever The Land explores the sublime bond between people and their land.  For the past 150 years, longstanding grievances over extreme colonization tactics have defined the Ngāi (tribe) Tūhoe and New Zealand governments relationship.  In 2014 history was made when the Tūhoe’s ancestral homelands were returned, the New Zealand government gave a official apology and Tūhoe built the first ever “Living Building” in Aotearoa New Zealand as a testament to their values and vision of self-governance.

 

Next Goal Wins

Saturday, May 20, 2017, 8 pm

In 2001, the tiny Pacific island of American Samoa suffered a world record 31-0 defeat at the hands of Australia, garnering headlines across the world as the worst football team on the planet. Next Goal Wins is an inspirational story about the power of hope in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds, and an object lesson in what it really means to be a winner in life.

 

Mele Murals

Saturday, May 27, 2017, 8 pm

Mele Murals is a documentary about the transformative power of art through the unlikely union of graffiti and ancient Hawaiian culture.  At the center of the story are two renowned street artists – Estria Miyashiro (aka Estria) and John Hina (aka Prime) – a group of Native Hawaiian youth, and the rural community of Waimea.  Through their stories Mele Murals shows how public art and Native Hawaiian traditions transforms the artists, students and community.

 

 

NA MELE
‘Ale‘a

NA MELE 'Ale'a

 

An encore presentation of a performance from the PBS Hawai‘i studios in Manoa by this multi-Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winning group comprised of Kale Hannahs, Ryan Gonzalez and Chad Takatsugi. They combine sweet harmonies with tight instrumentals to produce enchanting traditional Hawaiian music reminiscent of years gone by.

 

MUSIC VOYAGER
The Bahamas: Raking and Scraping Across the Islands

 

MUSIC VOYAGER travels to Cat Island in search of the roots of rake and scrape, the local music style Bahamians call their own. After a beach-side performance by traditionalists Bo Hog and the Rooters, it’s a trip to Grand Bahama in search of Stileet, a new generation rake and scrape singer who is bringing urban attitude to the style.

 

GLOBE TREKKER
Vietnam

 

Trekker Zay Harding discovers the checkered and often-dangerous history of the Vietnamese railway. His journey takes him to Hanoi, Hue, the DMZ and Ho Chi Minh City where he meets a general who led the final attack on the Presidential Palace during the Vietnam War.

 

Keepers of the Flame: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women

KEEPERS OF THE FLAME: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women

 

This is the story of three extraordinary Hawaiian women who helped revive Hawaiian culture when it was perilously close to being lost. It was a time when the monarchy had been overthrown, the Hawaiian language banned from public places and schools, and the Hawaiian heartbeat of hula forced underground.

 

Mary Kawena Pukui, ʻIolani Luahine and Edith Kanakaʻole combined commitment to Hawaiian history with art and aloha, to reignite the flame of tradition. Each planted seeds of the Hawaiian Cultural Renaissance. Kawena as a history and language expert, teacher and author, ʻIolani as a chanter, cultural icon and “high priestess of hula,” and Edith as a songwriter, teacher and founder of the traditional school of hula, Hālau O Kekuhi.

 

The lives of these three great women are described through heartfelt interviews with people who knew and were influenced by them, along with wonderful archival footage collected throughout the years.

 

Source: hawaiianlegacyfoundation.org

 

Hawaiian Voices:

Bridging Past to Present

HAWAIIAN VOICES: 
Bridging Past to Present

 

This award winning, one-hour documentary pays tribute to the role of the kupuna (elders) in preserving Hawaiian culture. It focuses on the legacies of three respected Hawaiian elders whose lives bridged the transition from older times into the late 20th century. They are Ruth Kaholoaʻa, age 93, of the Big Island; Lilia Wahinemakaʻi Hale, age 85, of Oʻahu and Molokaʻi; and Reverend David “Kawika” Kaʻalakea, age 78, of Maui.

 

A special emphasis in the documentary is the power of the Hawaiian language as a key to cultural connectedness and continuity. Each of these kupuna speaks Hawaiian fluently, as it was once learned within their families. Each is a living archive of invaluable lore and recollection, a treasure whose stories, memories and perspectives need to be shared as a way of bringing the healing wisdom of the past into the often-fragmented world of the present.

 

“The films of Eddie Kamae are like no other. His only subject is his subject, not a demonstration of style. Direct, heartfelt, unfettered, pure, Kamae’s effect is one of wry precision.”
– Dave Donnelly, Honolulu Star-Bulletin

 

Source: hawaiianlegacyfoundation.org

 

Words, Earth & Aloha:
The Source of Hawaiian Music

WORDS, EARTH & ALOHA: The Source of Hawaiian Music

 

In Hawaiʻi, music has always been much more than a form of entertainment; it has been a key to Hawaiian culture. This one-hour documentary explores the sources of a complex tradition, from early chants and 19th century gospel influences, to the work of composers who flourished between the 1870s and the 1920s, for whom Hawaiian was still a first language. This film pays tribute to the poetry and play of their lyrics, as well as the places and features of nature which inspired songs still loved and played today.

 

This is the fourth film in Eddie and Myrna Kamae’s highly acclaimed Hawaiian Legacy Series. It features some of Hawaiʻi’s most respected cultural resources and talented performers. Among them: Pualani Kanakaʻole Kanahele, Lydia “Mama” Hale, Andy Commings, Clyde “Kindy” Sproat, Helena Maka Santos, Sheldeen Halemau, Gary Halemau, Aaron Mahi, Rev. Dennis Kamakahi and “Braddah Smitty” Hoapili Smith.

 

“A fascinating cultural story of Hawaiʻi from the 1870s to the 1920s, as seen through the development of a distinctly Hawaiian style of music. It charts the melding of imported musical forms with the indigenous chants of the native Hawaiians, and shows the continuous inspiration of the natural beauty of the islands.”
– Rita De Silva, The Garden Island

 

Source: hawaiianlegacyfoundation.org

 

Kī Hōʻalu: Slack Key, The Hawaiian Way

KĪ HŌʻALU SLACK KEY: The Hawaiian Way

 

This film is a moving journey into the beauty and meaning of Hawaiian slack key music. Director Eddie Kamae’s rare combination of master musician and cinematic storyteller is the key to showing how Hawaiʻi’s cultural traditions and the ki hoʻalu guitar intertwine, and opening the door to a greater love of that music.

 

Candid interviews and archival images combine with the music of many virtuoso performers, from the legendary Fred Punahou and Gabby Pahinui to Raymond Kane and today’s Ledward Kaapana, to tell the slack key story from the 1830s to the present. It shows you how this music perpetuates family tradition as songs, techniques and special string tunings are passed from one generation to the next.

 

All the main islands are visited, including seldom-seen Niʻihau, as Eddie Kamae explores this kind of Hawaiian music and its links with the people and places that have nourished it.

 

“A beloved document with candid interviews, virtuoso performances, impromptu dances, and some archival footage that tells, like never before, the precious story of slack key, from the early 19th century to the present.”
– Wayne Harada, Honolulu Advertiser

 

Source: hawaiianlegacyfoundation.org

 

NA MELE
Kenneth Makuakāne

 

Renowned songwriter, record producer and performer Kenneth Makuakāne offers a sentimental and candid performance inside historic Kawaiaha‘o Church in Honolulu. When Kenneth performs, he draws on vibrant memories and meaningful relationships. “It’s almost like going back in time,” he says. Among the songs he performs are “‘O Violeka,” an affectionate ballad for his mother, and “Ku‘u Pua Lei Mēlia,” inspired by his experience of sending off his oldest son to college.

 



AFRICA’S GREAT CIVILIZATIONS
Origins/The Cross and the Crescent

AFRICA'S GREAT CIVILIZATIONS: Origins/The Cross and the Crescent

 

Beginning with Africa’s ancient history as the cradle of mankind, this documentary series, hosted by Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr., brings to life the epic stories of both celebrated and little-known African kingdoms and cultures.

 

Origins
Journey with Dr. Gates to Kenya, Egypt and beyond as he discovers the origins of man, the formation of early human societies and the creation of significant cultural and scientific achievements on the African continent.

 

The Cross and the Crescent
Dr. Gates charts the ancient rise of Christianity and Islam, whose economic & cultural influence stretched from Egypt to Ethiopia. Learn of African religious figures like King Lalibela, an Ethiopian saint, and Menelik, bringer of the Ark of the Covenant.

 

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